Author Topic: Memories  (Read 7961 times)

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Memories
« on: August 14, 2006, 10:17:04 PM »
I thought about posting this a few days ago, but didn't want to seem too self-centered. Anyway, here it is. The one year anniversary of my immigration has just gone by - August 11. If you would like to go down memory lane with me, you can read these old threads on babble. I will never forget all the people who expressed their good wishes for me.

Deportation Order

The Big Day

The Celebration

Feel free to share your most precious memories here. We can revisit this thread one day, and have a good cry-fest.

Toedancer

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Memories
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2006, 12:12:38 AM »
Wow!

'Ceud mille failte'

and a thousand more.

Remember "No kay tay chickabee"?
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

skdadl

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Memories
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2006, 04:45:22 AM »
That was all so exciting, ephemeral. It was such a great thing, but it happened so suddenly, was such a big surprise for everyone. Wahoo!   :D

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Memories
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2006, 01:08:39 PM »
Quote from: Toedancer
Remember "No kay tay chickabee"?


No... should I?

Again, thanks to everyone for their support.

'lance

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« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2006, 01:22:34 PM »
What skdadl said. Wahoo! And I wish I could have been at the Cat 'n' Fiddle (the name alone would have been enough to bring out my RFL).

Immigration memories. This spring, my RFL's cousin and her (that is, the cousin's) husband got their Canadian citizenship, having become landed immigrants four or five years ago. Naturally, we went to the ceremony.

Now, I tell myself, and anyone who'll listen, and some who won't, that I'm no kind of nationalist. Stolen land, artificial lines drawn on maps, the general foolishness of flags and anthems and patriotic folderol... you get the idea. Nonetheless, I found something about the ceremony extremely moving (it probably helped that the citizenship judge was a kindly old gent, and a funny one, and a better ambassador for this country or any other I can hardly imagine), and I was seriously choked up by the end.

I wish I could say why. Alan Bennett wrote a play about this very kind of feeling (though about England, of course) called Forty Years On, which by hook or by crook I want to see performed before I die.

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« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2006, 02:27:44 PM »
RFL?

Quote from: 'lance
Immigration memories. This spring, my RFL's cousin and her (that is, the cousin's) husband got their Canadian citizenship, having become landed immigrants four or five years ago.

Congratulations to them!  :mrgreen:

Quote
Now, I tell myself, and anyone who'll listen, and some who won't, that I'm no kind of nationalist. Stolen land, artificial lines drawn on maps, the general foolishness of flags and anthems and patriotic folderol... you get the idea. Nonetheless, I found something about the ceremony extremely moving (it probably helped that the citizenship judge was a kindly old gent, and a funny one, and a better ambassador for this country or any other I can hardly imagine), and I was seriously choked up by the end.


Well, you know, it is emotional for me because this really is a good place to be. As much as I miss my birthplace and as much as I think Harper's got to go and lots has got to change in Canada, there is no denying that I am more priveleged here in umpteen ways. Even when I am struggling to meet the rent payments, I am constantly aware of how fortunate I am. This is a more advanced country with greater conveniences and stronger social freedoms. Every country has its problems, and one of the problems in this country is that people live excessively. Some people are aware of that, but they have a sense of self-entitlement to their excesses. So, although I am no nationalist for Canada, I cannot help but feel grateful to all the people who helped me feel at home here.

Toedancer

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« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2006, 03:12:52 PM »
I'm sorry Eph, I forgot, Nell was made in 1994, gosh so long ago. In the film Nell says No Kay Tay Chickabee.  No kay tay means 'no cry tears'. And I believe her mom called her Chickabee as an endearment. I may have that wrong of course, it's been a long time. So Nell was remembering her mom and repeated what she had heard her say. I thought it was appropriate for your 'journey'.

Quote
Jodie Foster stars as Nell Kellty, a young woman who lives in the care of her mother in a backwoods cabin in the mountains. Nell has never learned conventional English speech, having spent her early years conversing in 'twin speech' with her twin sister until she died when they were six years old. Her mother has had a stroke which has distorted her language, and Nell has never seen anyone else or needed to talk to them. As a result, Nell speaks a language of her own - a blend of twin speech and garbled English. When Nell's mother dies, the outside world finally confronts her, in the shape of Drs Jerry Lovell (Liam Neeson) and Paula Olsen (Natasha Richardson).


http://www.movie-gazette.com/cinereviews/323
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

'lance

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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2006, 03:20:39 PM »
Quote from: ephemeral
RFL?

Reason for living. Which just makes her roll her eyes (though I can't much blame her). Gratitude, I tell you; gratitude!

Quote from: 'lance
Immigration memories. This spring, my RFL's cousin and her (that is, the cousin's) husband got their Canadian citizenship, having become landed immigrants four or five years ago.

Quote
Congratulations to them!  :mrgreen:

Yes, there weren't a whole lot of opportunities for them in the old country (Chile). On the other hand, they've been struggling a bit here too. But at least here they have better air quality and a whole lot less rampant fear/paranoia about crime.

Quote
Now, I tell myself, and anyone who'll listen, and some who won't, that I'm no kind of nationalist. Stolen land, artificial lines drawn on maps, the general foolishness of flags and anthems and patriotic folderol... you get the idea. Nonetheless, I found something about the ceremony extremely moving (it probably helped that the citizenship judge was a kindly old gent, and a funny one, and a better ambassador for this country or any other I can hardly imagine), and I was seriously choked up by the end.

Quote
Well, you know, it is emotional for me because this really is a good place to be. As much as I miss my birthplace and as much as I think Harper's got to go and lots has got to change in Canada, there is no denying that I am more priveleged here in umpteen ways. Even when I am struggling to meet the rent payments, I am constantly aware of how fortunate I am. This is a more advanced country with greater conveniences and stronger social freedoms. Every country has its problems, and one of the problems in this country is that people live excessively. Some people are aware of that, but they have a sense of self-entitlement to their excesses. So, although I am no nationalist for Canada, I cannot help but feel grateful to all the people who helped me feel at home here.


There's no doubt about it, I'm fortunate and privileged, as are most of the people I know. And don't get me wrong: I'm grateful to be living here, though I'd be more so if I had a better idea who I might be grateful to (among the living, that is). The people who make it all possible, maybe.

As for the people who "live excessively" (probably most of us) -- with so many of them, I don't get the sense they live particularly well, in the sense of joyfully. All the material preconditions are there, but so often seem mere compensations for the lack of something else. Though that's just modernity for you, not necessarily this society in particular.

Happy the people who have such compensations available, I suppose -- or not, as the case may be.

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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2006, 03:32:36 PM »
To each his/her own. :)

Gigi

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« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2006, 03:49:29 PM »
Congratulations, btw.

This country has some idiotic ideas of who contributes and who doesn't.

k'in

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« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2006, 09:43:47 PM »
ephemeral-wow-that is quite the journey.

I have to deal with immigration (Canada & USA) from time to time & the bureaucracy can be mind numbing.

Glad you got through it & Canada is fortunate to have you!

Bacchus

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« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2006, 11:29:02 AM »
Congrats Eph, I remember when you and Mrs bacchus were going through this!

ANd the Cat and Fiddle was fun!
When you're on your own
When you're at a fork in the road
You don't know which way to go
There's too many signs and arrows
You haven't laughed in a while
When you can't even fake a smile
When you feel ashamed...
The uniform don't make you brave

Croghan27

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Here come da Queen.
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2010, 08:51:56 AM »
I am ambivalent about the Queen as our head of state. Yes, the monarchy is something of an medieval anachronism with a dubious history, and it is superfluous as far as political power goes. Our GG declined to make a political statement when she did not go with a coalition when Harper tried his prorogation stunt for the second time. She kept the Monarchy strictly out of local politics. But as an icon used to focus the nations exasperation, she does well. (I have a certain affection for the traditions stretching back centuries.)

Perhaps being from New Brunswick and in particular from Saint John, the LOYALIST CITY, I am familiar with much attachment to the institution, but I ask what the assembled masses of BnRer's think about using the British Monarchy as our Head of State.

I cannot gather any affection for the American model - that unites both the ceremonial and the actual government leaders in the person of The President - it seems .... messy to me.  I am not familiar enough with the French model where the President and the Prime Minister are elected to make a coherent comment upon its' operation.  :confused

If we have to have a ceremonial HoS - Elizabeth II seems to be very acceptable - she is a presence without without exerting or attempting to exert power, operating by influence rather than mandate.

So long as She and her GGs work that way - outside the particisan political realm - she is a not-too-bad idea.
 
« Last Edit: June 29, 2010, 08:53:20 AM by Croghan27 »
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Boom Boom

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Re: Memories
« Reply #13 on: June 29, 2010, 08:57:10 AM »
But then there's Quebec, where I live.  :popcorn

lagatta

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Re: Memories
« Reply #14 on: June 29, 2010, 09:28:55 AM »
The French system used to be a normal parliamentary democracy, with the presidency as a largely ceremonial position, but De Gaulle staged a quasi-coup with the establishment of the 5th Republic.

In countries where governments (not the State) tend to be unstable, the presence of a head of state not directly linked to the party or coalition in power is very important.

Boom Boom, yes in general here in Québec, but a funny aside is that old sovereignist Jacques Parizeau is also an ardent monarchist and anglophile. He actually says things like By Jove, harking back to his long ago university days in Britain...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

 

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