Author Topic: French Question  (Read 17729 times)

lagatta

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« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2006, 08:59:32 PM »
deBeauxOs, I have an Austrian translator friend who assures me that Arnult sounds just as much like a caveman* in German as he does in English.

* Apologies to actual "cavemen" and "primitive" people I've met, who are usually most courteous.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #16 on: June 19, 2006, 09:44:24 PM »
lagatta wrote:
Quote
... an Austrian translator friend assures me that Arnult sounds just as much like a caveman* in German as he does in English.
 
You have met cavemen?   :shock:    Where?  :wink:   In a previous life?   :?    In Austria?  :lol:  

Could Arnult/Ah-nold's strange accent be just another gimmick ... it certainly was for Jean Chrétien who put on his phony 'abitant voice to maintain his "p'tit gars de Shawinigan" shtick long after people stopped believing its authenticity.

Toedancer

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« Reply #17 on: June 19, 2006, 09:58:27 PM »
Quote
 

Could Arnult/Ah-nold's strange accent be just another gimmick ... it certainly was for Jean Chrétien who put on his phony 'abitant voice to maintain his "p'tit gars de Shawinigan" shtick long after people stopped believing its authenticity.


Celine Dion does that as well. I heard/saw her do it for one full, very long, boring hour, when my mother forced me to watch Oprah.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2006, 11:05:08 PM »
In Céline's situation, the accent may be authentic.  Her schooling was all in French and I believe that she first learned her English songs phonetically.  

But Chrétien attended university in English and French and I have heard him speak without putting on a thick habitant "bubba" accent.  It may very well be why Québecois people do not trust him, his heavy joual accent is more of the 'bucheron' than Lac St-Jean or Saguenay type.  :roll:

Edited to add: I asked Debra to move this thread to Franco-fun because I want to remind all members of Bread and Roses that participation in this forum is not limited to those who read or write in French.

Toedancer

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« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2006, 04:52:33 AM »
Thanks DB for clearing that up, I guess. I'm not a fan of CD, in fact I actively dislike her. The truth is, I find her so dam phoney about everything. She uses being French speaking (her mother tongue) as an excuse to garner extra attention from Americans. On Oprah, on Larry King. I've heard her being interviewed in Canada and never once does she use the phrase "Am I pronouncing that correctly?" But she says it at least once on every Usian show.

Dam strange woman.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

lagatta

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« Reply #20 on: June 20, 2006, 06:00:34 AM »
Well, there is Ötzi the Iceman, an early human discovered in the Tyrolean Alps, on the Austrian-Italian border (the Italian side is now mostly German-speaking too: Sud-Tirol/Alto Adige - who knows what they spoke in Ötzi's day...) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oetzi_the_Iceman

The Austrians I know have accents nothing like Ah-nult, in English or French (at least two of them also speak Italian - remember that Austria borders Italy).
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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« Reply #21 on: June 20, 2006, 06:06:46 AM »
"I'm finished" is colloquial, it's true, but so colloquial that it is now the version you are much more likely to hear in North America, maybe even read. I'd never thought of this before, but "I've finished" is becoming downright formal.

I'm not sure which I would say m'self if you woke me up in the middle of the night and made me say it suddenly.

Morning Glory

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« Reply #22 on: June 20, 2006, 08:30:42 AM »
Isn't there a phrase in English that when translated directly into French translates as "I'm pregnant", or something like that.  I know that "I'm pregnant" is, "je suis enceinte".  But I seem to remember once trying to say "I'm full" in French and what I said came out as "I'm pregnant."  Could it have been "Je suis plein", or "J'ai plein"?

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #23 on: June 20, 2006, 10:49:54 AM »
Quote from: Morning Glory
Isn't there a phrase in English that when translated directly into French translates as "I'm pregnant", or something like that.
 Was it grossesse / grosse?  As in "big with child"?  :mom2b

Mandos

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« Reply #24 on: June 20, 2006, 10:53:36 AM »
She looks hungry.

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #25 on: June 20, 2006, 11:05:46 AM »
Quote from: Mandos
She looks hungry.
 :lol:   Yeah, and what's with that goofy thing on her head?  Is it a tiara?  It's certainly NOT a "suivez-moi-jeune-homme".

brebis noire

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« Reply #26 on: June 20, 2006, 11:16:33 AM »
Quote from: Morning Glory
Isn't there a phrase in English that when translated directly into French translates as "I'm pregnant", or something like that.  I know that "I'm pregnant" is, "je suis enceinte".  But I seem to remember once trying to say "I'm full" in French and what I said came out as "I'm pregnant."  Could it have been "Je suis plein", or "J'ai plein"?


It could very well have been that - it happened to me once, a long time ago, and I never quite got over it (had to be there) even though some francophones have since assured me that it can also be understood as being replete after a meal.  :)  

I'm quite sure it's a farmer thing - when they say 'elle est pleine', they mean the cow is with calf. It's very common usage, even by vets. (Pleine/pas pleine.)

Anyways, I remember trying to find different ways of saying 'please, no more - I'm full' politely in French, and I don't think I ever quite came up with a satisfactory and spontaneous equivalent. I just try to keep in mind that French Women Never Get Fat...  :wink:

Debra

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« Reply #27 on: June 20, 2006, 11:16:54 AM »
Well pregnant women are often hungry. I think the purple ribbon serves to remind that the smilie is a pregnant belly rubbing female, not a hungry belly rubbing male.  :wink:
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #28 on: June 20, 2006, 11:27:55 AM »
Quote from: brebis noire
... Anyways, I remember trying to find different ways of saying 'please, no more - I'm full' politely in French, and I don't think I ever quite came up with a satisfactory and spontaneous equivalent. ...
How about "Je suis repue jusqu'au bout des doigts et des orteils." ? Or you could use the very eloquent expression in LSQ (Langue des signes québecoise) for sated which is to lift your hand, held horizontally, straight up to under your chin.   8)

skdadl

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« Reply #29 on: June 20, 2006, 11:31:47 AM »
Je suis gonflé comme un saucisson.

 

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