Author Topic: DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]  (Read 279162 times)

anne cameron

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #30 on: March 19, 2007, 11:16:30 AM »
But not, I assure you, in the Biblical sense.

skdadl

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #31 on: March 19, 2007, 11:29:17 AM »
Oh, well -- me neither! me neither!

GDKitty

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #32 on: March 19, 2007, 11:42:10 AM »
Quote from: anne cameron
And I have NO idea what you'd have to cast Dusty Foggo as, but I betcha it ain't no dreamboat.

:lol:  Well, let's start the betting: here's Dusty's high-school yearbook photo (from the AP story)...


Dare I say it?  Did he not have an Oscar Wilde-ish thing going on?  No good for casting purposes, but y'know...t'was the first thing that sprung to mind. :oops:

skdadl

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #33 on: March 19, 2007, 11:55:04 AM »
Now that you mention it, Kitty, I see what you mean, but my very first thought was that he reminded me of one of the Bee Gees (I forget which one).

pogge

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #34 on: March 19, 2007, 11:59:52 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
Now that you mention it, Kitty, I see what you mean, but my very first thought was that he reminded me of one of the Bee Gees (I forget which one).


This one? (That's Robin Gibb.)

GDKitty

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #35 on: March 19, 2007, 12:03:33 PM »
Chr*st in shitty napkins, that picture shoulda come with a warning  :shock:

Ok...I guess you warned us that it was Robin Gibb, but Jeebus I'm glad there's nobody else in this lab today :lol:

justme

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #36 on: March 19, 2007, 12:07:41 PM »
:rotfl:

deBeauxOs

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #37 on: March 19, 2007, 01:55:23 PM »
Quote from: GDKitty
... Dare I say it?  Did he not have an Oscar Wilde-ish thing going on?  ...
As in 'The Picture of Dorian Grey'?.... yup, I agree.

Croghan27

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #38 on: March 20, 2007, 05:08:21 PM »
here's something that might outdo the Prosecuter's purge.

Quote
In a bold move "to restore trust to elections in Ohio," Ohio's newly-elected Secretary of State, Jennifer Brunner, has requested the resignation of all four members of the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections.
Thank you. Common Dreams.

Already -
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Felony convictions have also resulted in 18-month prison sentences for two employees of the Cuyahoga BOE as a result of what the county prosecutor in the case calls the "rigging" of the outcome in the recount following the 2004 presidential election

The problems were that;
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In the 2004 presidential election, Cuyahoga County suffered serious election irregularities that worked to the disadvantage of Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry. Among them: the purging of 24.93% of all the voters in the city of Cleveland, where Kerry won 83% of the vote; mysterious and suspect vote totals for third party candidates in majority African American wards; unexplained "security" problems that caused the last-minute shift of voting locations in the inner city Cleveland Public School polling places; improbably low apparent turnouts in heavily Democratic inner city wards, and more.


This is more fundamental than the bouncing out of a few republicans because they were not Republican enough.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

arborman

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #39 on: March 20, 2007, 06:21:34 PM »
Quote from: Croghan27

This is more fundamental than the bouncing out of a few republicans because they were not Republican enough.


Perhaps, but it will be harder to get into the public eye.  Most people are willing to accept as a point of faith that politicians and political operators are sleazebags.

Fewer people are willing to accept that 'the best democracy in the world' actually isn't.  It is one potent mythology, that the Republicans have been exploiting for all they can squeeze out of it.  And I suspect it still has legs.
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Croghan27

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2007, 09:11:06 PM »
Quote
Fewer people are willing to accept that 'the best democracy in the world' actually isn't. It is one potent mythology, that the Republicans have been exploiting for all they can squeeze out of it. And I suspect it still has legs.


Arborman, I should have watched my language there. I do not think the Republican Party is any more anti-democratic than the Democrats. just as I have met conservatives in Canada (MPs too) who's political philosophy made me want to shower, but I had to respect the person for honestly held convictions. (That I do not agree with something does not make it automatically wrong.)

I do think the party of Abraham Lincoln and even Teddy Roosevelt has been hijacked by a bunch of cynical, smarmy operatives that have managed to convince too many people that their vision of a world that never was (family values, stay-at-home mommies, anti-abortion) will lead to a world that never will be (armageddon, the millenia, prosperity for all).

Perhaps if enough of these heros of the new right get enough of the true believers brought up on charges and show they have been erroneously convinced that the end is that important that any means is worth it, some epiphany will occur. Libby 'got' it, Cheney may have to resign, that some of the high profile sleeze gets trimmed will leave in place the thousands of their acolytes.

I know some Republicans in the US (have even contributed some money to their campaigns) and these Rove/Cheney/Scooter operating ethics is not are not an exemplar of the party members.

Scandals happen, but the Party has lost any self-regulating mechanism, and it has to be imposed from outside. You are right, it still has legs.

(WOW - I really got off on that one, didn't I?)  :D
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

anne cameron

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #41 on: March 20, 2007, 10:21:04 PM »
Down there, as up here THEY ARE ALL A BUNCH OF BUMS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Holly Stick

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #42 on: March 20, 2007, 11:19:10 PM »
Cliopatria about Talking Points Memo being ahead of the MSM on this story; sounds like another hive mind at work.  And there are several good links.

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...Yes, of course it's messy. But it's a brilliant deployment of a blog's readers as research assistants that will keep Marshall on top of a story that is breaking this morning. No mainstream media reporter or staff of reporters in the country will have surmounted the "document dump" to know what's in it. Marshall will be closer to claiming that than anyone else.


http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/36753.html
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skdadl

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #43 on: March 21, 2007, 06:00:08 AM »
I was making notes on some of yesterday's developments on the Plame thread, which I gotta stop doing or we'll confuse ourselves.

It's fascinating to watch what's happening at TPMuckraker -- the original comments thread is partway down the main page now, but I keep hoping they will pick some more nuggets out to highlight.

ePluribus Media have made the document dump searchable, and jukeboxgrad has created files that are searchable and smaller.[/URL] So, for anyone wanting to read all those emails ...   :wink:

But a lot of people are, which as Cliopatria says is putting the hive mind out ahead of any reporters who aren't checking the hive.

Depending on the analysts you read, though, the confrontation between the White House and the two judiciary committees can look more or less imminent, more or less fraught, more or less modest for the time being. There are a lot of cheerleaders out there, but, for example, Kagro X at dKos thinks that the White House may be able to get away with stonewalling, given the Supreme Court, and if Congress loses a showdown over this case, they will have been checked on several others:

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Realize that the resolution of this stand-off will determine the extent to which the Congress is able to investigate everything that's still on their plate. If they lose this showdown, they lose their leverage in investigating NSA spying, the DeLay/Abramoff-financed Texas redistricting, Cheney's Energy Task Force, the political manipulation of science, the Plame outing... everything.

And that's why Bush is playing it this way. Remember, too, that his "administration" is populated by Watergate and Iran-Contra recidivists, chief among them Dick Cheney, who has wanted to relitigate the boundaries of executive power since forever. Cheney and others on the inside believe that this time, with a friendlier judiciary, these issues can be decided the "right" way, overturning the victories won against Richard Nixon's insane theories of executive power.

Their thinking is that they'll either win it in courts, or run out the clock trying.

And the day they get five Justices to say they're right, everything you thought you knew about checks and balances becomes wrong.


I think that's the worst-case scenario, but it's a caution amid the cheerleading. We'll see what Mr Conyers does today.

I can hardly believe that Fred Fielding is still the front man for the stonewalling. Gosh: that takes me back, but then so does John Conyers.

skdadl

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DoJustice [was "The prosecutor purge"]
« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2007, 09:49:25 AM »
Btw, while the work is being done at TPMuckraker, Josh Marshall is keeping up his more general summary comments at the main site, Talking Points Memo.

The most interesting discovery to have turned up so far is an eighteen-day gap at a crucial point in the justice department emails. Eighteen ... eighteen ... gee, why is that figure ringing faint bells?  :D

 

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