Author Topic: The Paper Route  (Read 3700 times)

ranger

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The Paper Route
« on: August 24, 2007, 12:58:56 PM »
Wasn't sure where to post this, but it's a good chuckle, especially if you've ever had a route.


http://thetyee.ca/Life/2007/08/23/ThePaperRoute/
If you don\'t stand for something, you will fall for anything.

Debra

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The Paper Route
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2007, 01:10:38 PM »
:mrgreen:  Having been the overworked parent of a paper carrier I can see that his days as a carrier were numbered.
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arborman

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The Paper Route
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2007, 03:13:33 PM »
I flat out loved my paper route.  I had one from ages 9-14, and it was possibly the best job I've ever hand.

Every morning my dog and I went for a good long 2 hour walk, while the world slept.  I got to spend time with my thoughts, he got to manage his kingdom and drive all the other dogs batty with his territorial marking while they were penned up inside.  I got to have breakfast, my favourite meal, twice - once before and once after the walk.

Whenever I needed pocket money for any reason, I just had to stop and ask one of my neighbours for some.  I learned utterly awful money management skills, which I still struggle with.  Endless money (for a ten year old), available on the walk to the store or the arcade if I only stopped and asked for some.  I was always behind on my collection of the fees, so a single house could yield ten dollars or more.  

The money was utterly disconnected from the morning walk in my mind, which I usually enjoyed more than anything else.  I had two routes, three at one point.  Xmas was a joy, as everyone gave me chocolate and fat tips.  I knew the names and subscription status of every house in our subdivision, and somehow I was able to remember it perfectly as I walked along every morning.  If someone was on holidays their house wouldn't even enter my consciousness as I walked past it.  The day of their return I'd find myself slipping the paper into the screen without even thinking about it.

I became an expert at the nuances of tossing a paper so as to land with the fluttery bits in the corner (and unlikely to fly away).    

I'd do it now if it paid well enough.  At five years I got my Edmonton Journal 5 years of service watch ;).  Shortly after that, my father decided that the early mornings were affecting my schoolwork (they weren't, it was the apathy what done it), and encouraged me to quit.  Foolishly, I did.
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skdadl

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The Paper Route
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2007, 03:56:23 PM »
Paper carriers of yore, tell me: why did paper carriers stop being kids on foot or on bike and become adults in cars (which they certainly are here now)?

I never had a route but my older brother did, and I think he liked it pretty much as you did, arborman. Nine or ten seems pretty young to me, though -- I think he must have been in his teens when he started.

Anyway: fine original, ranger, and also lovely reflection, arborman.

ranger

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The Paper Route
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2007, 05:02:47 PM »
This story brought back a couple of memories for me, when I finally got my paper route I had 70 papers, my Dad made me a carrier to hold 70-80 papers (they where thin) when low and behold one day every store in town decided to put their flyer in the paper on the same day, and they more than doubled in size, my pick-up station and route where not that close to each other, so I looked at the situation and said "what the"? "they asked me to deliver the paper" so I dumped the flyers and did my job, well a couple of days went by and I guess a couple of pissed off grannies had called in so Dad gets a call and he asks me what's up? I told him,(I thought I was gonna get it) I was shocked when he asked the manager at the paper "you wanted someone to deliver the newspaper didn't you?" that was my last day. LOL
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arborman

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The Paper Route
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2007, 05:21:05 PM »
Quote from: skdadl
Paper carriers of yore, tell me: why did paper carriers stop being kids on foot or on bike and become adults in cars (which they certainly are here now)?

My theory is that parents stopped being willing to let their kids wander the streets alone.  Nobody collects the funds from the houses anymore either - it's all by direct subscription (which would have been lovely in my day).

Quote
I never had a route but my older brother did, and I think he liked it pretty much as you did, arborman. Nine or ten seems pretty young to me, though -- I think he must have been in his teens when he started.


I was a big kid, and lied about my age at the beginning.  Smallish town too (Leduc, AB), the city is likely a bit different.  The upper age limit among the other carriers was about 13, with the occasional adult.
The pleasures of the table are for every man, of every land, and no matter what place in history or society; they can be a part of all his other pleasures, and they last the longest, to console him when he has outlived the rest.

 

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