Author Topic: Labour Day  (Read 1598 times)

Toedancer

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Labour Day
« on: September 01, 2007, 04:06:47 PM »
There is too much to read about Labour in this crazy mid-decade we are in.
But I was drawn to this piece re: Israel/Palestine from this perspective:
About Labour for Palestine: Labour for Palestine is a network of activists involved in promoting and strengthening the BDS campaign across a variety of different Canadian unions as a sub-committee of the Coalition Against Israeli Apartheid (CAIA).

Quote
In July 2007, a group of labour leaders from the US issued a statement opposing the growing international campaign of boycotts, divestment and sanctions (BDS) against Israel. The statement was signed by a number of presidents from unions including the American Federation of Teachers, the American Postal Workers Union, the Communication Workers of America, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, and the AFL-CIO(1). It was widely discussed in the Israeli media, where it was presented as a response to this summer’s important set of boycott resolutions from unions in the UK. While the US statement can in no way be seen as representative of grassroots sentiment within the North American trade union movement, as labour activists involved in a variety of Canadian unions we feel it is important to respond to the array of mistruths and distortions it contains.

Singling out Israel or International Solidarity?

The US statement begins by endorsing a sentiment that is repeated adnauseum by pro-Israel activists:

“with the diverse range of oppressive regimes around the world about which there is almost universal silence, we have to question the motives of these resolutions that single out one country in one conflict.”

The first thing to note about this argument is that it contains a remarkable omission. Nowhere in the entire US statement is there mention of the fact that the global campaign of BDS against Israel is a direct response to an urgent appeal signed in July 2005 by over 170 Palestinian worker, student, farmer, women, professional and refugee associations (2). This appeal was endorsed by every Palestinian trade union federation and is the broadest and most representative call for international solidarity ever made by Palestinian society.


http://www.palestinechronicle.com/story ... 112208.htm
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

sparqui

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Labour Day
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2007, 07:31:28 PM »
I have to read that whole story more closely Toe. I was thrilled that CUPE joined the boycott as well as the UK university profs but boy did they feel the backlash. When will people park their political perspectives and realize that THIS IS a human rights issue?!?!
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

Toedancer

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Labour Day
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2007, 07:51:58 PM »
Exactly Sparks, kind of like the difference between tomato juice and the real recipe for skunk. ha!
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Holly Stick

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Re: Labour Day
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2010, 03:34:33 PM »
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Toedancer

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Re: Labour Day
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2010, 11:24:30 AM »
Oh thanks for that HS, a great article with some real reality injected.
Pogge's post in Brit Politics and Labour reflects as well. Did u read Michael Moore's rant? It's a great excuse to use the words fuckety fuck fuck if you like that sort of thing. I do. I can't link it because my 'puter seems to be fucked up. I have no idea why Moore still 'likes" Rahm or even why he admits that, he seems to be stuck in the 2 party only false dichotomy, one wonders why.  :confused

Happy Fuckin' Labor Day!
                                                                    
                                                                    By Michael Moore
                                                                    
Dear Rahm Emanuel:
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Croghan27

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Re: Labour Day
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2010, 11:47:06 AM »
from Toe's quote from Israeli apologists and activists.

Quote
“with the diverse range of oppressive regimes around the world about   which there is almost universal silence, we have to question the   motives of these resolutions that single out one country in one   conflict.”

Can I take it from this that Israel counts itself as one of the diverse range of oppressive regimes around the world??? 

Are they sure this is what they want to say?
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Toedancer

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Re: Labour Day
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2010, 05:10:39 PM »
Because this happened so close to LD, I'll post it here.  A clear example of how the attack on workers pensions links with health and safety issues. They insist on separating them because, we're too duh, to figure out a connection?
*Head Bang Desk* We're talking nucular here people, scabs!

Explosion Rocks Honeywell URANIUM facility run by SCAB WORKERS
*Cote is one of President Obama's personal appointments to the Deficit Commission* 


earlier read @ HuffPost


"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Croghan27

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Re: Labour Day
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2010, 05:29:58 PM »
Because this happened so close to LD, I'll post it here.  A clear example of how the attack on workers pensions links with health and safety issues. They insist on separating them because, we're too duh, to figure out a connection?
*Head Bang Desk* We're talking nucular here people, scabs!

Explosion Rocks Honeywell URANIUM facility run by SCAB WORKERS
*Cote is one of President Obama's personal appointments to the Deficit Commission* 


earlier read @ HuffPost

From the link:
Quote
The plant splits hydrofluoric acid into hydrogen and fluoride. The   hydrogen then gets scrubbed and released into the atmosphere and   fluorine goes into the process. If the hydrogen and fluorine recombine,   it can be very reactive and cause a non-radioactive hydrogen explosion.

It has been my good fortune to NOT work with H2F. It is extremely dangerous, even as it is a rather economical. (It can be used to increase octane in naphtha for gasoline production.) Several refineries I have worked in have had the opportunity to use hydrofluoric acid in the process and have gone to other methods because it is so very, very dangerous.

I would expect a company that is trying to destroy: retiree health care coverage and pension plans. would have no problem choosing a dangerous, but cheaper method.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Toedancer

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Re: Labour Day
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2011, 10:06:16 PM »
And yet, an analysis of strategies and tactics is desperately needed. The unfortunate reality is that smashing a window, even many windows, does not challenge the power of capital in any fundamental way, let alone overthrow the power of capital. Profits are not impeded when insurance can cover the cost of replacing windows, and capitalism does not grind to a halt – or even turn tail and run – when specific meetings are shut down or interrupted or when the ‘symbols of capitalism’ (the windows of Starbucks and Adidas, for example) are smashed. Changing the world would be so much easier if this were the case!
Rather, the inequality inherent in capitalist production derives from the fact that the value of the work we perform is more than what we are paid in wages, and that difference (the profit) goes to the employer, not us. Disrupting this social relation means getting at the core of what makes capitalism function as an economic system. Because the profit taken from us relies on our continuing to work, effectively challenging capital would require disrupting this chain of profit acquisition through stopping work. And going from challenging capital to ultimately overthrowing capital would involve seizing control of, and paralyzing the production of profits in, these very workplaces.
This dauntingly far-reaching task of seizing control – collectively and democratically – of our workplaces and other institutions will thus obviously require large mobilizations. But it will also require large numbers of us actively working together, self-organizing – in stark contrast to more passive forms of political engagement (such as electoral politics) undertaken by isolated individuals. And this mass self-activity must be capable of disrupting the immobilization, powerlessness and cynicism that we often feel, so that we begin to experience our world in new ways – as makers of history capable of changing our world rather than bystanders watching our world make or break us. Tactics like an occupation, blockade, militant strike, or sit-in, for example, are some of the methods that better enable us to begin to take power with our own hands. These three elements – mobilizing a lot of people, in ways where we ourselves are active and not passive, and in ways that enable us to experience and wield our power collectively – are key ingredients in building our counter-power.
The passivity of unions/leaders/activists has been quietly downgraded in the last few years, just when they need to step up. And yet we know where that leads. It was an open admission in the courts that MLK was a danger to civil society. Why? Because his philosophy of non-violence was too threatening. Yet what I bolded above won't happen because..........labour day is almost upon us and I have personally witnessed labour leaders working in tangent with the gob. 
« Last Edit: August 29, 2011, 10:06:59 PM by Toedancer »
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

lagatta

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Re: Labour Day
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2011, 10:30:47 PM »
I don't understand, Toe. Where does this quote come from?
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
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Re: Labour Day
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2011, 10:30:47 PM »

 

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