Author Topic: It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]  (Read 65476 times)

transplant

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« on: July 08, 2006, 01:39:26 PM »
Gallup: Almost Two-Thirds Want Iraq Withdrawal

E&P -  A new Gallup poll finds that roughly 2 in 3 Americans urge a U.S. withdrawal from Iraq, with 31% wanting this to start immediately.

Gallup's director, Frank Newport, sums up the results today: "Taken together, it is perhaps fair to say that a significant majority of Americans would like the United States to either withdraw troops from Iraq or make specific plans to do so, although there is no majority demand that troops be withdrawn immediately."

The poll was unusual in that rather than give respondents a list of options, it allowed them to respond in their own words. Gallup then grouped the varied responses and labelled them with a common theme.

Results showed that almost 1 in 3 want to "pull the troops out and come home," as soon as possible. About the same number seem to wish for a gradual pullout. The remaining one-third back the present course or want to "finish what we started."

Only 2% want to send more troops. The same number urge: "Admit we made a mistake/Apologize and move forward." ...
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transplant

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2006, 03:36:12 PM »
US outsources war to Filipinos

Asia Times - Filipinos are taking up work at US-run facilities in Iraq, dodging an official Philippines travel and employment ban on the war-torn country and providing the US military and its affiliated contractors the cheap, English-speaking manpower it is having increasing difficulty recruiting at home.

The deployments to Iraq represent an illicit spin on the Philippines' global outsourcing phenomenon, where more than 8 million Filipinos have left home for higher paying jobs abroad. The Philippine government imposed a ban on the deployment of overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) to Iraq in July 2004, soon after Manila recalled its small humanitarian contingent after militant captors threatened to behead a Filipino truck driver working for the US occupation forces....
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transplant

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2007, 12:09:57 PM »
Even their "Dear Friends" are now turning on them...

Abdullah: U.S. Occupation 'Illegitimate'

AP - RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — King Abdullah denounced the American military presence in Iraq on Wednesday as an "illegitimate foreign occupation" and called on the West to end its financial embargo against the Palestinians.

The Saudi monarch's speech was a strongly worded lecture to Arab leaders that their divisions had helped fuel turmoil across the Middle East, and he urged them to show unity. But in opening the Arab summit, Abdullah also nodded to hardliners by criticizing the U.S. presence in Iraq.

"In beloved Iraq, blood is flowing between brothers, in the shadow of an illegitimate foreign occupation, and abhorrent sectarianism threatens a civil war," said the king, whose country is a U.S. ally that quietly aided the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. ...
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brebis noire

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2007, 12:13:21 PM »
It seems to me that the majority of Americans aren't against the war in Iraq per se, but they are against the fact that it is going badly.  So they want to pull out, and damn the consequences of that too.  :x

transplant

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2007, 08:36:23 PM »
Ex-Iraqi Cabinet Official Blasts Occupation

AP - In a rueful reflection on what might have been, an Iraqi government insider details in 500 pages the U.S. occupation's "shocking" mismanagement of his country _ a performance so bad, he writes, that by 2007 Iraqis had "turned their backs on their would-be liberators."

"The corroded and corrupt state of Saddam was replaced by the corroded, inefficient, incompetent and corrupt state of the new order," Ali A. Allawi concludes in "The Occupation of Iraq," newly published by Yale University Press.

Allawi writes with authority as a member of that "new order," having served as Iraq's trade, defense and finance minister at various times since 2003. As a former academic, at Oxford University before the U.S.-British invasion of Iraq, he also writes with unusual detachment.

The U.S.- and British-educated engineer and financier is the first senior Iraqi official to look back at book length on his country's four-year ordeal. It's an unsparing look at failures both American and Iraqi, an account in which the word "ignorance" crops up repeatedly.

First came the "monumental ignorance" of those in Washington pushing for war in 2002 without "the faintest idea" of Iraq's realities. "More perceptive people knew instinctively that the invasion of Iraq would open up the great fissures in Iraqi society," he writes.

What followed was the "rank amateurism and swaggering arrogance" of the occupation, under L. Paul Bremer's Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA), which took big steps with little consultation with Iraqis, steps Allawi and many others see as blunders...

In other words: Hey dude, get the fuck out of my country!
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skdadl

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2007, 05:00:31 AM »
transplant, there is also a great article by Mark Danner in this December issue of the New York Review of Books, laying out in detail the absurdity of Bremer's pro-consulship in Iraq, his utter mismanagement of everything, and Rumsfeld's responsibility for that.

transplant

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« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2007, 10:26:50 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
transplant, there is also a great article by Mark Danner in this December issue of the New York Review of Books...

 
Yes, skdadl, but this one comes from the puppet's mouth and bites the puppeteer's hand doing the feeding. Combine it with the the Papal statement yesterday that nothing positive is happening in Iraq, and McKain's fabricated market walkabout, and the 12000 national gaurd being called up.
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skdadl

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2007, 11:01:38 AM »
Oh, transplant, I agree. That is a significant advance.

The details of Bremer's mismanagement are hair-curling, though. You can just tell where they were inevitably going to lead.

skdadl

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2007, 07:31:58 AM »
Riverbend, the author of Baghdad Burning, and her family are getting ready to leave Baghdad.

Quote
The wall, of course, will protect no one. I sometimes wonder if this is how the concentration camps began in Europe. The Nazi government probably said, "Oh look- we're just going to protect the Jews with this little wall here- it will be difficult for people to get into their special area to hurt them!" And yet, it will also be difficult to get out.

The Wall is the latest effort to further break Iraqi society apart. Promoting and supporting civil war isn't enough, apparently- Iraqis have generally proven to be more tenacious and tolerant than their mullahs, ayatollahs, and Vichy leaders. It's time for America to physically divide and conquer- like Berlin before the wall came down or Palestine today. This way, they can continue chasing Sunnis out of "Shia areas" and Shia out of "Sunni areas".

I always hear the Iraqi pro-war crowd interviewed on television from foreign capitals (they can only appear on television from the safety of foreign capitals because I defy anyone to be publicly pro-war in Iraq). They refuse to believe that their religiously inclined, sectarian political parties fueled this whole Sunni/Shia conflict. They refuse to acknowledge that this situation is a direct result of the war and occupation. They go on and on about Iraq's history and how Sunnis and Shia were always in conflict and I hate that. I hate that a handful of expats who haven't been to the country in decades pretend to know more about it than people actually living there.

I remember Baghdad before the war- one could live anywhere. We didn't know what our neighbors were- we didn't care. No one asked about religion or sect. No one bothered with what was considered a trivial topic: are you Sunni or Shia? You only asked something like that if you were uncouth and backward. Our lives revolve around it now. Our existence depends on hiding it or highlighting it- depending on the group of masked men who stop you or raid your home in the middle of the night.


Via More Notes from Underground

Zastrozzi

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2007, 03:20:37 AM »
Josh Marshall writes:

With Harry Reid's controversial 'war is lost' quote and with various other pols weighing in on whether we can 'win' or whether it's 'lost', it's a good time to consider what the hell we're actually talking about. Frankly, the whole question is stupid. Or at least it's a very stilted way of understanding what's happening, geared to guarantee President Bush's goal of staying in Iraq forever.
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We had a war. It was relatively brief and it took place in the spring of 2003. The critical event is what happened in the three to six months after the conventional war ended. The supporters of the war had two basic premises about what it would accomplish: a) the US would eliminate Iraq's threatening weapons of mass destruction, b) the Iraqi people would choose a pro-US government and the Iraqi people and government would ally themselves with the US.

Rationale 'A' quickly fell apart when we learned there were no weapons of mass destruction to eliminate.

That left us with premise or rationale 'B'. ...

This is the key point: right near the beginning of this nightmare it was clear the sole remaining premise for the war was false: that is, the idea that the Iraqis would freely choose a government that would align itself with the US and its goals in the region. As the occupation continued, anti-American sentiment -- both toward the occupation and America's role in the world -- has only grown.

I would submit that virtually everything we've done in Iraq since mid-late 2003 has been an effort to obscure this fact. And our policy has been one of continuing the occupation to create the illusion that this reality was not in fact reality. In short, it was a policy of denial.

It's often been noted that we've had a difficult time explaining or figuring out just who we're fighting in Iraq. Is it the Sunni irreconcilables? Or is it Iran and its Shi'a proxies? Or is it al Qaida? The confusion is not incidental but fundamental. We can't explain who we're fighting because this isn't a war, like most, where the existence of a particular enemy or specific danger dictates your need to fight. We're occupying Iraq because continuing to do so allows us to pretend that the initial plan wasn't completely misguided and a mistake. ...

It's a huge distortion to say that this means the war was 'lost'. It just means what the war supporters said would happen didn't happen. The premise was bogus. ...

...the disaster has already happened. Admitting that isn't a mistake or something to be feared. It's the first step to repairing the damage. What the president has had the country in for four years is a very bloody and costly holding action. And the president has forced it on the country to avoid admitting the magnitude of his errors.
Much of that could apply to the Canadian "mission" in Afghanistan, even if the terminology used by the supporters and opponents of the "mission" isn't quite the same as that used in the States with reference to Iraq. And the situation isn't a perfect parallel. But essentially, as the song goes, "we're here because we're here because we're here because we're here...."

Debra

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2007, 07:22:52 AM »
I can't find a thread on the Afghan prisoner debacle so I'm going to put this here. Thomas Walkom
Quote
The only surprise about the Afghan prisoner controversy gripping Ottawa is that any of this comes as a surprise.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Conservative government is reeling under allegations that prisoners captured by Canadian troops are being handed over to Afghan authorities who then torture and abuse them.

The opposition is in full cry. The newspapers are chock-a-block with references to the brutal abuse handed out by Afghan police to those unfortunate enough to be identified as Taliban suspects.

But what did we think would happen when, in 2001, we signed on to support a gang of brutal warlords trying to oust the gang of brutal clerics who were running this unhappy country?

Afghanistan today may have the trappings of democracy – a well-tailored president elected in a relatively fair vote, a parliament that includes women, even a constitution that promises full-blown political rights.

But underneath, not much has changed. As Canada's foreign affairs department notes in an internal report, the reality of Afghanistan remains bleak.

A censored version of that report, grudgingly released this week under access to information laws, talks of "political repression, human rights abuses and criminal activity by warlords, police, militia and remnants of past military forces."

Those unfortunate enough to end up in the Afghan justice system, the report says, find that bribes and connections are essential. "Those who have no money or power can remain in prison without trial for months, and possibly years." Violence against women is widespread "both at home and in public."

http://www.thestar.com/News/article/208192
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

GDKitty

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #11 on: April 29, 2007, 03:11:28 AM »
Berlynn has a post up about "Women, Peace and Security" in Afghanistan. Votez-vous (if you're still up & aboot).

skdadl

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #12 on: April 29, 2007, 06:35:02 AM »
Berlynn's still on the main page.  :)

Both Marshall's and Walkom's columns say something I believe in and try occasionally -- we have to change the language, correct the language and the framing, by which these Western military adventures are known, and we have to defy the re-writing of their history every time someone in power tries to disappear the truth.

Practise defiant lines like "It's not a war, people," or "This isn't new and it shouldn't come as a surprise, and it's our fault if it does." Whenever I write about Afghanistan (I haven't had the heart to write about Iraq for some time), I try to say those things, but even in my immediate neighbourhood, it is one uphill battle to get people to shake off the propaganda.

Luke

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2007, 11:23:43 AM »

transplant

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It's still the f*ing war [Iraq]
« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2007, 01:16:13 PM »
Gangs of Iraq

Radar - Desperate to shore up its flagging ranks, the military is quietly enlisting thousands of active gang members and shipping them to Iraq. Will a brutal murder finally wake up the Pentagon?

He was groggy, thirsty, and in terrible pain. His bowels and kidneys felt like they were about to explode. Faint bruises, some the size of a soldier's fist, others the size of a military-issue combat boot, were already forming on Sergeant Juwan Johnson's skin. A trickle of blood oozed from the corner of his mouth.

It was almost a miracle he was able to stand, some of the soldiers who were with him that night would later recall. They were amazed he still had the blue bandanna clutched tightly in his fist. Things had gotten out of hand.

Only a few guys were supposed to be beating him—maybe three or four, definitely no more than six. They were men Johnson knew and trusted, soldiers he had fought with in Iraq. The beating was only supposed to go on for a minute or so. After all, they weren't trying to kill him. They were trying to make him one of their own.

All he had to do was hold onto the blue rag and silently suffer through the slaps and kicks and punches. When it was over, he would become an official member of the Gangster Disciples, a man with connections all over the United States. Hell, all over the world.

But something had gone awry on that summer night at the Kaiserslautern Army Base in Germany. It seemed like everybody in that secluded pavilion, a grill house not far from the barracks, had taken turns pummeling the small young sergeant from Baltimore. In the frenzy, no one even knew for sure how long the assault had lasted.

When it was over, Johnson still held the gang's "colors" in his hand. He had made it through, bloodied but still breathing....

The next morning, on July 4, 2005, Sergeant Juwan Johnson, a decorated Iraq War vet and full-fledged member of the Gangster Disciples, was found dead from internal injuries. He was 25. ...
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