Author Topic: Crying  (Read 3592 times)

anne cameron

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2845
    • View Profile
Re: Crying
« Reply #30 on: May 20, 2008, 07:32:27 PM »
My pig cried when his good buddy the  poodlymutt died.  He sobbed.  And when a pig cries it's tears are the colour of tea.  Ruarhaigh Boar mourned so deeply and so completely I got him a puppy.  I was afraid he would die, his grief was so terrible.  For a few days he ignored Kate but she won him over.  Kate died of a heart attack the day after Ruarhaigh Boar died.  I'm sure the heart attack was because her heart was broken.

DAMN, but I miss that pig, he was nicer than most people!  He could also laugh, tease, and pull jokes and pranks.  And, smarter than many people, he never voted conservative in his life!

BCseawalker

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 751
    • View Profile
    • http://economicusridiculous.blogspot.com/
Re: Crying
« Reply #31 on: May 20, 2008, 07:35:12 PM »
Aaahhh... Anne, do you have any pictures of that pig? Gosh, that's a sweet story!

anne cameron

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2845
    • View Profile
Re: Crying
« Reply #32 on: May 20, 2008, 08:07:08 PM »
I don't have any photo's and I'm too much a techno-dolt to know how to feed them in, anyway.  He was pink, with white bristles, and he looked like a pig.  He had a straight little tail with a white tuft on the end, which he wagged when he was happy.  When the blackberries were ripe his maw was stained purple.  He ate the centres out of dandelion plants, he had several different places he used only for toilet purposes, and he slept in the hallway, on a pallet of blankets, just outside my bedroom door.

I think the absolutely funniest part of the whole Ruarhaigh Boar experience came when my blonde daughter arrived on the farm with some of her friends.  They came in, we were doing the hugging and the introductions and then here came Ruarhaigh, tail wagging happily.  One of the friends nearly shat himself and my daughter exclaimed OHMIGAWD, Mo, I'm so sorry!  I didn't even think........and Mohammed smiled bravely and said he had never known anybody before who kept a giraffe in the house.  The entire time he was there Mo called Ruarhaigh a giraffe.

I suspect there are other animals who cry, we just don't get to really know them.  I know when I took Viva to the stud she had to stay almost a month and while she was gone old Molly got so lonely and depressed I was getting worried about her.  And when Dice went blind he flatout refused to eat or drink.  Wouldn't even let me hand feed him.  I asked several people who knew horses and they all said that's how horses commit suicide and Dice didnt' want to live blind.  So I had him put down because the other was just too godawful to contemplate.

We treat animals as food or as amusements or entertainment and we don't seem to dare get to actually know them, on their terms.  Mostly, Ruarhaigh lived a pig life, he got fed a teeny bit morning and night and he could come in the house any time he wanted but in decent weather he was outside, his choice.  I didn't want him to root up the entire yard so from the beginning as soon as he started to dig I'd bang the window and yell "no".  It took a couple of weeks, and he learned not to root..but if he was pissed off at me he'd turn his back to the house, peek over his shoulder, then deliberately rip up a bit of the lawn.  It was so obviously "fuck you, snarly bitch" that I'd nearly collapse in laughter each time.

The horses absolutely detested him.  Those who knew horses said it was because pigs smell like and sound like bears.

Ruarhaigh didn't mind getting his face washed, and he liked having lotion applied to the dry skin on his shoulders but each time we tried to bath him we'd no more than get him in the round rinse tub and he'd poop.  Immediately.  More "up your kilt, milt" messages.

I miss him.  He was an absolutely exceptional and loyal friend.

Toedancer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13953
    • View Profile
Re: Crying
« Reply #33 on: May 20, 2008, 08:31:57 PM »
Anne your animal posts make me laugh and cry. We could just as easily ask why we laugh. Everything I thought of off the top of my head is in the link, especially spontaneous baby laughter usually over and with animals. Lots of youtubes on that.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3077386/
and animal laughter here: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7348880/
Oz laughs her fool head off when I play hide n seek with her one bikkey a day, after she finds it I threaten to take it away and her hilarity and antics are a game that she loves. If I'm not playing correctly she will re-hide her bikky in her own blankey and then shake it like crazy for it to re-appear to start again.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

RP.

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1224
    • View Profile
Re: Crying
« Reply #34 on: May 20, 2008, 09:04:55 PM »
Quote from: skdadl
Or, more domestically: when do you cry? or when do you forbid yourself to cry, and why?

I cry on Palm Sunday.  [shakes head at self]

Berlynn

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6362
    • View Profile
    • http://politicsnpoetry.wordpress.com
Re: Crying
« Reply #35 on: May 20, 2008, 11:09:35 PM »
I've always been a bit of a deep feeler who cried when hurt.  I grew up being called a crybaby and it has only been in the past few years that I have reclaimed my right to cry.  I hate how society treats people who cry.  

Oh, I can see I hold some anger about this.  Sorry.  :rant: coming!

Crying is a release for me and stopping that release is not a healthy thing for me to do.  Crying is a way to heal and, good grief, don't we all need that?

Emotionally, we are warped in our development, I think, or at least I was.  And many are losing the ability to cry.  Why the fuck tell someone not to cry if that's how s/he is feeling?  Just because someone else experiences some discomfort?  And what's that discomfort about?  Inadequacy?  Inability to control?  Seems to me that's her/his issue, not the crybaby's.

I'll damned well cry anywhere and any time the tears demand it, thank you very much!

Here endeth the :rant: !

A poet once told me that tears are saltier when the sorrow we're releasing is old.  I've found that to be true.  And interesting.

Evolutionarily, well, I'll have to ponder that.  Good question, skdadl.
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

J. Parson-Robert

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Crying
« Reply #36 on: May 21, 2008, 02:06:33 AM »
Laughing and crying.

How often have we laughed until we cried, or cried until we laughed?  I'm partial to the scientific explanations posted above which more or less fit with the idea I learned through Richard Dawkins.  As babies, we cry to indicate fear or distress until we learn to recognize a face (through imprinting) and then we laugh.

Of course, sometimes we cry and never laugh.  That seems to happen most often when we're alone.  Crying and laughing alone are somehow different from crying and laughing in public.  I'm reminded of the difference between (dramatic) irony and sarcasm; irony requires an audience.

sparqui

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7420
    • View Profile
    • http://resettlethis.blogspot.com/
Re: Crying
« Reply #37 on: May 21, 2008, 12:35:36 PM »
Oh anne, like Toe, your posts made me laugh and cry. There is nothing sadder than a broken heart.

There was a film I saw as a kid that had me sobbing for hours. It's a vague memory but I remember it involved a group of colonials captured by the Japanese (WWII) who were being marched to some camp. Anyway, there were a couple of young kids among the captives -- one died of illness( (?) and the other soon after of a broken heart.
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

Croghan27

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7694
    • View Profile
Re: Crying
« Reply #38 on: May 29, 2008, 06:07:02 PM »
I try, lord knows I try not to be sucked in by hokum - mostly unsuccessfully. Dickens, unashamedly switches from pathos to bathos and breaks my heart every time. Hokum works through some kind of agreement between the author and the reader  beyond the suspension of disbelief ... to be in any way effective, it must contain a powerful element of reality.

I have been reading The Cynic and Senator Obama - By Charles P. Pierce (again) from a link I got from Matt&t. (and Matt&t is thrise blessed for it) It is written in a faux first person style that should, should be a turn off for me .... he even illustrates some manufactured emotion in the article, speaking of an "warm up' Congresswoman for Obama - here is this passage, about HRC:
Quote
“In this corner,” Moore begins, “wearing the helmet of fear, the breastplate of pride, wielding the shield of special-interest dollars and carrying the sword of bitter partisanship!” The crowd boos lustily. There’s no room for metaphor in the cynic’s politics anymore. His head is beginning to throb. Congresswoman Moore is just getting warmed up.
and about Obama:
Quote
“The candidate of the people. Skinny young man. Big ears. Funny name. Armed with the experience of humble beginnings. Educated in Ivy League suites. Trained in legislative seats. Toughened in inner-city streets.”

(Okay, this is more like it.)

“Wearing the helmet of good judgment.”

(Uh-oh.)

“The breastplate of hope. Wielding the shield of unity. Carrying the sword of truth. And feet marching to the beat of change!”
He (the Cynic is afraid of the metaphor.) - but then he switches back into his persona.  

Finally the last lines of the piece still leave you waiting - is he still the Cynic? Was he convinced? Converted?

No ......

Quote
The cynic believes in an old, abandoned country that’s no less illusory than the redeemed one Obama is promising to this crowd. Isn’t that something? the cynic thinks. Maybe that’s enough, that single revelation, just a flicker of the lost imagination. For the last time, in the roar of the crowd, it comes back to him again. Convince me America is not an illusion. Convince me that it never was. Convince me that you’re not a pious mirage. Convince me that we’re not. Now that you brought it up, convince me.

Convince me.

Convince me.

Convince me.

WOW - I read that in a laboratory waiting room this afternoon .... when I finally finished I had tears cascading down my cheeks.

God-damn Charlotte, it is so well written. Hokum, of course ... but terrific and moving. All the more so for the truth of it.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Croghan27

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7694
    • View Profile
Re: Crying
« Reply #39 on: October 06, 2010, 08:21:45 AM »
..... and you think that you're having a bad day:

"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Bread & Roses Forum

Re: Crying
« Reply #39 on: October 06, 2010, 08:21:45 AM »

 

Return To TAT