Author Topic: Politics of adequate funding  (Read 1929 times)

Debra

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Politics of adequate funding
« on: July 12, 2009, 10:36:29 AM »
This is an interesting piece. Raising a number of questions. Among them -- is anyone [politicians and policy makers] ready to admit that the cycle of poverty is a political invention not a moral failing among the poor and that there is a movement to spell the end of universal education.

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On June 2, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled that the Indiana Constitution does not require the General Assembly to provide adequate funding for students who are living in poverty, learning to speak English or struggling to meet other educational challenges. In a class-action lawsuit brought by a group of students from Indianapolis Public Schools, Gary and other high-poverty school districts, the court ruled that the level of school funding and the quality of educational services are strictly a political question to be determined by the legislature.


With this landmark ruling, Indiana became one of only a handful of states where the doors of the courthouse are closed for students who are left behind when the legislature fails to adequately fund the services they need.

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“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Alison

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Re: Politics of adequate funding
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2009, 05:49:30 AM »
I can't speak to the US education system but yes, from the loansharking practices of the IMF to each country's decision not to house the homeless even though it would be cheaper to do so than to leave them homeless, the cycle of poverty is definitely a political invention.
Remember when you were young and you learned that there is always enough food to feed everyone in the world but no priority to implement it. Where did the horror of that discovery go?

vmichel

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Re: Politics of adequate funding
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2009, 10:58:45 AM »
The central problem is that US schools are locally funded through property taxes. The state and federal legislatures have the responsibility to see that students are educated fairly and not discriminated against, but don't have the responsibility or authority to fund schools. (That's a gross oversimplication, as schools do access federal and state funds, but those are "extras.")

So in my county we have something like 12 independent school districts, each serving an area a few miles wide, and each reliant primarily on the tax revenue from the inhabitants of those few miles.

Along with local funding comes local control, which most districts are loathe to consider yielding.

Alison

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Re: Politics of adequate funding
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2009, 12:09:49 PM »
vmichel : And does that work well, in your country?

vmichel

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Re: Politics of adequate funding
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2009, 05:42:47 PM »
No! It's grossy unequal!

Croghan27

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Re: Politics of adequate funding
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2009, 06:52:35 PM »
Louis Robichaud, the first Arcadian Premier of New Brunswick, grew up in that environment; when country battled country of the crumbs of investors beneficence. He is famous in NB for institution the Equal Opportunity program that took funding out of the hands of the local counsels and into that of theprovincial government.
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Two decades ago, the New Brunswick government began implementing the Equal Opportunity program, a sweeping reform of provincial-municipal relations. It abolished the elected county governments, centralized some important functions at the provincial level, and instituted equalization in municipal financing.

The immediate result of that was a flowering of literate culture and an amazing increase in the economie of the great arch from Moncton, through Bathurst to Edmomnston.

Even the PCs under the long serving Hatfield recognized it was so successful they did not even try to alter any of it.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

 

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