Author Topic: Crisis in Health Care  (Read 8492 times)

Debra

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Crisis in Health Care
« on: June 04, 2006, 11:07:25 AM »
If anyone is interesting in learning more about P3's LHIN's and the current threats of privitization, I have posted an article I wrote on my blog.

It is long so and yet barely scratches the surface.

There is much to be concerned about.

http://www.aprilreign.blogspot.com/
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GDKitty

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2007, 09:58:38 AM »
Wow, Debra!  I was looking for somewhere to post a new article (coming up...), when I came across this pre-Kitty post on LHINs, P3s etc.  That is some excellent research you've done!  I know it's on your old blog, but I'm bookmarking it anyway ;)

Your post made me think about some of the ways in which conservatives twist the (real) flaws in Canada's Health-care system to suit their own rhetoric. I am profoundly frustrated by certain aspects of our system, but I'm 99.999999% sure that privatization would only exacerbate these weaknesses.  That said, I find myself in an incoherent   :rant2: when I read things like this:
"Editorial writers and bloggers have a field day after Alberta woman sent to Montana for births" (Toronto Star)
Quote
GREAT FALLS, Mont.–The birth of identical quadruplet girls in Montana last month has ignited debate south of the border, with editorial writers and bloggers attacking the Canadian health-care system.

A shortage of neonatal beds in Calgary meant that Karen Jepp and her husband, J.P., had to travel from their Calgary home to Great Falls, Mont., for the birth of Autumn, Brooke, Calissa and Dahlia on Aug. 12.

[...]

"We're sure we speak on behalf of the entire community of Great Falls as we send heartfelt congratulations to J.P. and Karen Jepp. What a thrill to be part of such a miraculous birth," read an editorial from the Great Falls Tribune.

"We've heard much talk about Canada's `free' health-care system, glorified in Michael Moore's documentary Sicko. But the birth of the Jepp sisters are case in point that Canada's medical system is as flawed as ours, just on the other end," it said. "As our congressmen debate the future of our health-care system, we urge them to keep cases such as the Jepps' in mind."

[...]

"I'm sure Canadians like their health system. Just remember, though, that Canada's backup system is in Montana," writes Don Surber of the Charleston Daily Mail in West Virginia. "Great Falls has enough neonatal units to handle quadruple births and a `universal health' nation doesn't."

The headline in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reads "Canadians love their health care – in Montana."

[...]

An official with the Calgary Health Region defends the move to send the Jepps to Great Falls.

"We did not have the capacity to take four new Level 3 babies, so the call goes to Edmonton and to Vancouver and across Western Canada to find out if there is bed space," explained Don Stewart. "We had found across Canada there were not four Level 3 beds available, so that's when we looked to Montana, which is the closest facility to us with reasonable care and within a reasonable distance. That was only done after exhausting the options here at home.

"They (American critics) don't have all the facts and information, obviously," he added.

Stewart said there are 21 Level 3 incubators in Calgary, but a staffing shortage meant only 16 were in use when the Jepps were giving birth. Staffing levels will be increased by this fall, he added.

The birth of the quads exposes both the positives and negatives of the Canadian health-care system, according to Jack Goldberg, chair of the health lobby group Friends of Medicare.

"It's clearly our view that the U.S. system is going to meet some demands better than ours, particularly for those who can pay the whole shot by themselves. But overall, the American system is far more expensive. And, of course, we all know it fails to insure some 50 million people," he noted.

"I think we need to appreciate that it's because of our publicly insured system that this couple was able to get access to a hugely expensive service in the United States that may very well be denied to tens of millions of Americans. So even what happened there is a point in favour of our system – that these people were able to get there."

He said the negative side is that it's obvious the Canadian health-care system is "vastly under-resourced" and lacks facilities and health-care professionals because of past government cutbacks.

I know, I know...leave it to conservatives to miss the point. If Canada's Cons were still in opposition, whaddya bet they'd be screeching about the Jepps at the next available QP?  Of course, now that they're in power, they can quietly giggle to themselves, form secret task-forces with Dr. Day (CMA pres) and plot their worst :(

I'm not sure what I'm trying to say.  That story about the Jepps makes me feel profoundly embarrassed for our country. Privatization would lead to even fewer facilities with less access and greater cost. There's no reason in the world why we can't afford to properly kit-out our own neonatal care facilities.

Sorry for the  :rant:

Mandos

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2007, 10:11:54 AM »
There is a reason.  It's that people might think that the system actually works, in which case they wouldn't agitate so well for privatization.

GDKitty

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2007, 10:15:36 AM »
Touché :(

Mandos

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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2007, 10:23:56 AM »
Remember, we're talking about a school of thought in which it's considered appropriate to talk about drowning the kinds of services on which people depend for life and death in a "bathtub."  You know, a particularly sadistic sort of premeditated murder.

GDKitty

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2007, 10:29:49 AM »
Ah yes. Norquist's bathtub. (aside: anyone heard from that ghoul lately? Hidin from Abramoff investigators, maybe?)

Ack. Here's another doozy that showed up in my rss reader this morning:

"Urology shortage at crisis point, MD warns"
Quote
In a powerfully worded letter to the Eastern Health regional authority, urologist Dr. Douglas Drover said an "excessive volume of work" in the specialty has meant waiting times of almost a year for patients seeking treatment.

[...]

For instance, about 300 patients are waiting for operating room time so that surgery can be performed.

Drover is one of just seven urologists practising in Newfoundland and Labrador. He urged Eastern Health to hire more specialists, warning that not to do so would be "tantamount to medical negligence."

Andy Grant, a member of a prostate cancer support group in St. John's, said he is afraid that people will die — or already have — while waiting for surgery.

[...]

New Democratic Party Leader Lorraine Michael said she was disturbed to learn of the problems that Drover outlined.

"I think the word I would use is 'horrified.' I could not believe what was in his letter," she said.

"We're sounding like we're in a developing country and not in a province that has the resources that we have."

[...]

Drover's letter said Nova Scotia, with less than double the population of Newfoundland, has more than four times the number of urologists, with 29.

BlueGrey

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2007, 12:02:26 PM »
Any system, any system at all, would be better than what we currently have.  Please don't flame me -- I'm speaking honestly.  Our health system is broken and needs to be repaired.

deBeauxOs

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2007, 12:19:33 AM »
Replaced is a tall order.  Repaired seems less destructive.

BlueGrey

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2007, 12:55:08 AM »
My "work is informed by mental health issues" and there's a world of difference between physical and mental health treatment.  If I had a more tractable health problem, such as cancer, I'd be as outraged as everybody else.  

As it is, I'm going to opt out of the BC Medical Services Plan (even though my disability pension ensures that I pay no MSP premiums), file an Advance Directive with the Court (when I find a precedent), surrender my Canadian citizenship before the Prime Minister's Mental Health Commission (hopefully, in person if I'm invited to speak again but, if not, via registered mail) and then apply for refugee status to the United States of America.  

I can't express how seriously I take this issue.  I'd rather do time at Guantanamo (sp?) Bay than go through what I just did over the last few weeks.  Nevertheless, my post was insensitive to those struggling with their physical health and that's not really what I'm about.  So I'll respectfully bow out of the conversation now.  I try to stick to the psychiatric rights-related threads.  There's less chance of me of me being asked to leave that way.  Sometimes it's to my advantage to let people know I'm crazy.

BlueGrey

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2007, 01:05:24 AM »
Perspective is everything, really.  http://www.furiousseasons.com is my primary hang-out.  There, I might be considered a moderate.

Edited to fix url thingy.

Croghan27

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2007, 12:32:09 PM »
The score now stands at:

sane Health Care                   - 1
Catholic Ideology Dominating  - 0

In New York:
Quote
Catholic Charities petitioned to have the right to deny employees birth control coverage, citing religious objections to the use of contraceptives.

from Salon here.

A bit of flexability with the word 'right' - making a denial into a positive is shakey linguistics and thinking.

Quote
New York's Women's Health and Wellness Act prevents employers from discriminating against birth control in employees' health insurance prescription drug coverage


The good folks that work for the Catholic Charities in New York have every 'right' in the world to not take advantage of this provision in their health care package. The Health Care package does not have a 'right' to deny that provision.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

BlueGrey

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2007, 10:04:30 PM »
Quote from: Croghan27
The good folks that work for the Catholic Charities in New York have every 'right' in the world to not take advantage of this provision in their health care package. The Health Care package does not have a 'right' to deny that provision.


Honestly, what a non-issue.  Doesn't the "Catholic Charities" have better things to worry about?  You know, like priests molesting young boys?  I'm so proud to be an atheist.

BlueGrey

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2007, 10:08:07 PM »
Quote from: BlueGrey
My "work is informed by mental health issues" and there's a world of difference between physical and mental health treatment.  If I had a more tractable health problem, such as cancer, I'd be as outraged as everybody else.  

As it is, I'm going to opt out of the BC Medical Services Plan (even though my disability pension ensures that I pay no MSP premiums), file an Advance Directive with the Court (when I find a precedent), surrender my Canadian citizenship before the Prime Minister's Mental Health Commission (hopefully, in person if I'm invited to speak again but, if not, via registered mail) and then apply for refugee status to the United States of America.  

I can't express how seriously I take this issue.  I'd rather do time at Guantanamo (sp?) Bay than go through what I just did over the last few weeks.  Nevertheless, my post was insensitive to those struggling with their physical health and that's not really what I'm about.  So I'll respectfully bow out of the conversation now.  I try to stick to the psychiatric rights-related threads.  There's less chance of me of me being asked to leave that way.  Sometimes it's to my advantage to let people know I'm crazy.


What a spaz I am sometimes.  I am NOT going to opt out of BC Medical nor do any of the other things I listed here.  And, you know what, I think torturing political prisoners is worse than force drugging mental patients.  But I stand by my statement that mental health and treatment are quite different than physical health and treatment.

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Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #13 on: October 07, 2007, 10:21:21 PM »
Who's to stay which is worse? We all have different vulnerabilites and different tolerance levels. It's all subjective, but regardless, I think we can all agree that nobody should have to go through either kind of torture.

Toedancer

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Re: Crisis in Health Care
« Reply #14 on: December 02, 2009, 02:28:27 AM »
Cross Border Care - Part 1

Quote
Record numbers of Ontarians are being sent to the U.S. by their government for routine health care that should be available at home. A Metroland Special Report shows thousands of others are funding their own medical treatments south of the border, at high personal cost. The numbers have been rising for the last 10 years. Government approvals for out-of-country health care funding are up 450 per cent. Should Ontarians have to use a passport to get health care?
This is worth watching!
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