Author Topic: Harvesting  (Read 11849 times)

vickyinottawa

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Harvesting
« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2006, 01:10:53 PM »
Yeah, I haven't been to Lansdowne yet.  Parkdale is just too convenient!  Of course, you have to know which stalls to go to, as some stuff is not locally-grown.

scott

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Harvesting
« Reply #16 on: August 31, 2006, 10:58:37 PM »
I am pleased to say that I am self sufficient in garlic, raspberries, and strawberries. I don't think that is is possible to be self sufficent in blueberries (especially the low bush ones that I grow) but I harvested the first proper crop this year (after about 5 years of trying). A bear finally put my long suffering plum tree out of it's misery, but on the upside I may harvest grapes this year. I have a 12x16 hoophouse that I call "the Greek salad machine". :D  :D  :D  This is a critical time for greenhouse tomatoes here. Lots of green ones, but cold nights (elevation 1800')  mean they could get offed (or just fail to ripen).
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Boom Boom

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Harvesting
« Reply #17 on: September 01, 2006, 06:53:33 AM »
Quote from: vickyinottawa
Yeah, I haven't been to Lansdowne yet.  Parkdale is just too convenient!  Of course, you have to know which stalls to go to, as some stuff is not locally-grown.


I used to go to Parkdale often - a friend would treat me to an outrageously fatty smoked meat sandwich at an old coffee shop/diner  nearby - can't remember the name of the place. I'm surprised to hear there's non-local stuff sold - although presumably it's still all from within the Ottawa Valley? I think there was a rule years ago that stuff had to be resonably local. there was even something in the Citizen about that.

Sleeping Sun

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« Reply #18 on: September 01, 2006, 08:00:55 AM »
lagatta, the Landsdowne market is really nice. They weren't open the last couple of weeks, but if they're going to be open this weekend I might stop by.  My veggie basket provider is there, and I need more tomoatoes. :)

Parkdale is ok, but I was really disenchanted by both it and the Byward market, mostly becuase of all of the non-local produce sold.  I mean, it was convenient as I walked by it on my way home from work every day, so I could always pick up something fresh, but if that something fresh is pineapple or banannas, then you know it's not local.  I think there were a couple of stalls that had more local stuff that the vendors grew themselves, but the rest looks just like small scale distributor operations.

Boom boom, I don't know if it was open then, but it sounds like you're talking about Phil's Diner.  This might be a relatively new place, but if it is, it's got the retro diner look down pat.  And I don't mean the overly shined up chic retro-diner, but the actual old diner look.  And there is a bowling alley behind it. :)

My harvest this year was meagre.  Some greens harvested throughout the summer, a few carrots, my basil grew about 4 feet tall, then fell over and was eaten by the rabbits and/or squirrels.  The pole beans took off like Jack's beanstalk, growing up their poles and into the neighbours tree, but they still haven't flowered, so I'm not expecting a great harvest.  I'd need a ladder to pick the darned things, anyways.  So to compensate, tomorrow I'm going to the market.  Probably I'll go to Carp, and try to hit Landsdowne if it's open.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2006, 08:57:41 AM »
I don't think it was Phil's Diner - could have been, but doesn't sound like it. The place we went to has been there a long time, and no bowling alley. My companion was Ken McClymont, one of the old, original guys from the Ottawa Boy's Club who started up Woodland Camp (on the Ottawa River) in the 1940's. I doubt he'd go to one of those faux, retro places. Besides, it'd be beneath the dignity of an ex-Mob member to be seen there. :wink:

Abdul_Maria

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Harvesting
« Reply #20 on: January 28, 2007, 05:50:51 PM »
i had started about 25 plants in the only place that had sun in my apartment.  i went to watch Bay to Breakers in the morning, which is about a 3 hour party.  the foot race is secondary to the beer bongs; that was my observation.

i came home and rested.  then i went to take the seedlings to plant them about 5 PM.

then when i got home, i was tired and dirty, so i took a hot bath.

as i was getting out of the bath, i remember thinking, "you know, i'm not so crazy about Fava beans", an opinion which has since been reversed.  my plot came with a big Fava bean plant.

anyway, at that point i stubbed my toe on a piece of a reflector for a solar panel.  a sharp edge.  went about 5/8" of an inch deep, a few days later i measured.

after the shock of bandaging my foot using duct tape, which took about 20 minutes, at which point it stopped bleeding very nicely, i looked at my floor, and thought, "that looks just like the Shining".

so, this whole experience was bracketed by a thought about, first, Anthony Hopkins' role in Silence of the Lambs, and then, Jack Nicholson in The Shining.

i had a doctor appointment 2 days later.  and i was very grateful that i could still move the little toe on my left foot, and that it had feeling.  it could have been so much worse.  the metal went right between it and the toe next to it, like a knife.  a lot like a knife.

what surprised me was how much it didn't hurt.  it felt like it had been hit by a hammer, not cut.

anyway, the poor seedlings didn't have a chance.  we had 4 days of sun before i made it back.

i was left with a big Fava bean plant, which i actually did find out that i do like.

then the community garden had a problem with someone vandalizing our plants.  they hit my garden twice.

i ended up growing chamomile, partially because it doesn't look like anything, also cuz i drink a lot of chamomile tea, maybe 2 cups a day.

anyway, we had 3 garden work parties, and they were fun.  i did not win any gardening awards this last year.
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faith

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« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2007, 06:22:53 PM »
Magoo if your in a giving mood I would like your recipe for bleu cheese and sage pasta. ta very much
just picture it

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2007, 08:48:50 PM »
That wouldn't be "giving", that would be "sharing".  :)

In a deepish saucepan (I use a flat bottomed wok) melt about 2tbsp of butter (or less, if you feel your own mortality looming).  To this, when it's warm and melty, add about a quarter cup of table cream, or a tiny bit more half and half.  Bring to a gentle boil.  When it starts to bubble a little, add the blue cheese of your choice (I like Stilton, but I've used Cambozola, and also Danish Blue), about a crumbled quarter to half cup.  Let your own affinity for blue cheese guide you.  Some black pepper and salt to taste, and let it thicken some on very low (it should bubble very stickily) while you boil up your favourite pasta to taste (I go with fettucine or linguine).  

When the pasta is nice and al dente, drain (don't bother rinsing) and add to the sauce and give your pan a few flips.  Over top, more cracked pepper, and at the table, salt, and copious amounts of fresh sage, rolled in a tube and sliced into the finest shreds you can manage (aka: the chiffonade cut).  

Possible garnishes besides the sage include more blue cheese (crumbled), some lightly fried speck pancetta or bacon, or some walnuts, warmed gently in a skillet and broken in a mortar and pestle.

Very fall.  But also welcome in winter.  Some garlic bread wouldn't be out of place.
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faith

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« Reply #23 on: January 29, 2007, 01:46:44 AM »
Thanks Magoo- I wish my father was still here - he would absolutely love that recipe, so I will make it and think of him while I enjoy it. The walnuts sound perfect.

Thanks for sharing  :eat
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skdadl

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Harvesting
« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2007, 07:14:49 AM »
Ooh. I could do that. I could even do that today. Ooh.  :eat

Copious amounts of sage -- can't we have a rough estimate? How many leaves? It really would have to be fresh sage, wouldn't it. Dried sage is ok once cooked, but as a garnish it really wouldn't work.

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2007, 09:58:03 AM »
I've never tried it with dried sage, but my hunch is that your hunch is correct.  Go with fresh, if you can.  Dominion now sells all kinds of fresh herbs, all overpackaged and such, but the recloseable bag does help keep them fresh.

For Mrs. M. and me, I'd probably expect to chiffonade about 10 good sized leaves, at least.  And I'd leave the rest handy by the chopping block.
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