Author Topic: Indoor plants  (Read 23894 times)

skdadl

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« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2006, 04:30:18 AM »
Hi, Boom Boom.  :)

I must take a photo of another plant that I first met at Thorfinn's in 1985 that I still have going. It seems to be a sort of semi-succulent -- thick, fleshy, shiny dark green leaves, and grows like crazy. I just lop it off when it gets too floppy -- have never tried replanting the prunings. Someone here will recognize it.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #16 on: June 08, 2006, 06:29:08 AM »
skdadl, mail me a pruning if you will. I'd love to see if I can get it growing here. I need more indoor plants. I'm moving just down the road next month, and will be planting things outside that should grow in our maritime climate (cold, wet, short growing season).

brebis noire

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« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2006, 09:22:07 AM »
I don't much care for indoor plants (if only they could vocalise and tell me when they want water) but my son just acquired a Venus flytrap.

Besides sufficient water and not placing it in direct light (it's a swamp plant) does anybody know what to do with this kind of plant?

skdadl

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« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2006, 09:26:19 AM »
Isn't the fun supposed to come from feeding it bits of hamburger?   :D

I understand that mothers have to put up with this sort of thing. Me? No way I want a carniverous plant on the loose in the place where I sleep.   :wink:

Debra

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« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2006, 09:46:05 AM »
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Boom Boom

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« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2006, 09:57:43 AM »
Speaking of carniverous plants from the swamp, our local bog (in Kegaska, Quebec) is full of flesh-eating plants.

These are photos I took a summer ago:

1. sundew plant:   http://i5.tinypic.com/12302tu.jpg
 (bugs land on the sticky dew on the leaves and can not escape; are very slowly dissolved and devoured)

2. pitcher plants:   http://i6.tinypic.com/123086f.jpg
 (in the lower plant, that's a spider being dissolved in the poisonous liquid)

3. another type of pitcher plant: note the veins in the reddish-orange  plant: http://i6.tinypic.com/1230aye.jpg

4. yet another type of pitcher plant, very abundant here; insect is attracted by the flower's smell, explores the nectar, then the crimson (purple?) leaves fold in and traps the insect, which is then dissolved and devoured, crunch, munch, munch, burp:  http://i5.tinypic.com/1230dwh.jpg  

5. same plant as #4, but open to reveal nectar-producing centre of plant:  http://i5.tinypic.com/1230h7n.jpg  

(photos are too big to display here, even after using tinypic)

I'd love to transplant these things to my new property (and have them eat all the bugs), but it can't be done.

brebis noire

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« Reply #21 on: June 08, 2006, 09:59:16 AM »
Thanks for that link, Debra, I'll check it out with my son.

The plant hasn't actually caught any flies yet, it's too small, but we fed it a ladybug once and I think it's been digested.

Debra

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« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2006, 10:18:34 AM »
Great pics BB!

The pitcher plant looked interesting so I consulted wiki carnivorous plants are intriguing
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #23 on: June 08, 2006, 10:29:59 AM »
Baby Boomer wrote:
Quote
Speaking of carniverous plants from the swamp, our local bog (in Kegaska, Quebec) is full of flesh-eating plants. ... I'd love to transplant these things to my new property, but it can't be done.
Well, the solution would be for you to move to where the plants are ...   :shock:

What?  The idea of living in a North Shore bog does not appeal? The chirrup of the frogs & the whine of the mosquitoes could lull you to sleep at night, instead of the shushing of the waves on your waterfront shore.   :wink:

Boom Boom

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« Reply #24 on: June 08, 2006, 11:35:42 AM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Well, the solution would be for you to move to where the plants are ...   :shock:


Considering some of these plants creep around in the bog (at night?) I'd have to get some kind of security watchdog to keep at the door entrance (not to mention the windows) to ensure those creepy things don't try to devour me! :shock:  I doubt I'd ever be able to sleep, living in the bog. Besides, there may be other creatures in the bog I haven't seen yet .

Debra

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« Reply #25 on: June 08, 2006, 11:49:08 AM »
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Boom Boom

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« Reply #26 on: June 08, 2006, 12:00:54 PM »
"feed me! feed mmeee! feed meeee!"

Nikita

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« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2006, 11:40:05 AM »
I had a really cute cactus one time and I really loved it, but in the end it died.  It was one of those little guys with the stocky stem and red prickly ball on top.  I don't know how I managed to kill a cactus.  I mean, they live in the frickin' desert.  Isn't Saskatchewan desert-y enough?  

I think I'm going to try again, but I have to do some homework.  Maybe I put it in the wrong kind of dirt.  I've seen people put cacti in stones but I don't know if there is sand underneath or what.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2006, 12:26:04 PM »
I have a couple of small cactus books here, and one sure way to kill cacti is over-watering. Cactus need soil, so there must be sand underneath those stones. My neighbours cacti are doing much better than mine, and I think it's because they exercise more restraint when it comes to watering. I just can't get it through my thick head that cacti do best when with less water than anyone might expect, and I say this as one who used to vacation in the US southwest where cacti grow in the wild (and are protected aginst harvest by law). I have nice photos of beautiful cacti plants in New Mexico and Arizona if anyone wants either a link or the actual photo posted.

chcmd

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« Reply #29 on: June 09, 2006, 12:49:22 PM »
If you're not sure about the dirt for a cactus, you can actually buy a soil mixed specifically for cactus.  And only water once a month :wink:
Feel the fear and do it anyway

 

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