Author Topic: Translation please?  (Read 8859 times)

Debra

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Translation please?
« on: September 04, 2006, 08:55:33 AM »
A l'équipe de La Meute
meutequebecoise@sympatico.ca

Avis - La firme American Apparel - qui se targue de faire du commerce
équitable - inonde depuis des années les publications étudiantes et le
hebdos culturels (du genre VOIR) de pubs couleur pleine page aux motifs
"porno adolescente".

On en discute sur le Web, dans les blogues" de Sophie Durocher et Steve
Proulx (qui attribue cette mode au féminisme... arrgghh!)

Sophie Durocher (CHATELAINE): http://tinyurl.com/ra8we

Steve Proulx (VOIR)
http://www.voir.ca/blogue/billet.aspx?i ... IDBlogue=8

Bravo aux étudiantes qui font des pressions dans leur milieu pour faire
rejeter cette pub merdique par leurs collègues journalistes.
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

brebis noire

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Translation please?
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2006, 09:55:49 AM »
Hi Debra - 'la meute' is like a hunting pack, or a pack of dogs; it's a figurative expression to describe a group out on a hunt for something and they stick together.

"American Apparel - a company that brands itself as fair-trade -has for several years been saturating student magazines and daily cultural newspapers (like Montreal's VOIR) with full-page ads of adolescent porn.".

This is being discussed in blogs by people such as Sophie Durocher and Steve
Proulx (who attributes this trend to feminism... arrgghh!)

Sophie Durocher (CHATELAINE): http://tinyurl.com/ra8we

Steve Proulx (VOIR)
http://www.voir.ca/blogue/billet.aspx?i ... IDBlogue=8

Bravo to the women students who are putting pressure in the right places to have this kind of shitty publicity rejected by their journalist colleagues.

lagatta

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Translation please?
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2006, 10:57:07 AM »
Yep. (I was busy finishing up a translation for a client, although I am visiting Ottawa and Gatineau)...

A pity. I've pretty much given up on finding fairly-made clothing. If I had more money, I'd call on dressmakers, I think.

I remember when Roots and Cotton Ginny (just for example) featured all or mostly Canadian-made goods, but so much is made in low-wage countries now...

Glad that Gad gets shown up for the shithead he is...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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Translation please?
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2006, 12:51:36 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
... A pity. I've pretty much given up on finding fairly-made clothing. I remember when Roots and Cotton Ginny (just for example) featured all or mostly Canadian-made goods, but so much is made in low-wage countries now...
Try Cleo stores - unfortunately not all of their clothing is made in Canada, but some items are.  They carry sizes up to 16 and they have 'petite' clothing, all in the same location.  Last year I bought a cami and light sweater knits in the same colour range (light and medium teal / turquoise), during a pre-season sale, both manufactured in Canada.  I have worn them separately too - hardworking clothes, they are.

Luke

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Translation please?
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2006, 02:37:37 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
I remember when Roots and Cotton Ginny (just for example) featured all or mostly Canadian-made goods, but so much is made in low-wage countries now...



If you only knew of the Canadian practise of "hiring" "sub-contractors" to sew at home and their incomes.

I used to do the bookkeeping for a Vietnamese-Canadian entrepreneur many years ago and lemmie tell ya the incomes of his 'subcontractors' were nowhere near Que minimum wage.

lagatta

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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2006, 03:19:12 PM »
Luke, I'm well aware of that, not only from work in the labour movement (trade unions and groups that helped the unorganised etc) but from my own neighbourhood where such abuses are rife.

But it is easier to fight abuses when they are right there than several thousand km away...

deBeaux, I will look at Cléo - some of their clothes are too mumsy or power-woman for me, but often one can find something...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Luke

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Translation please?
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2006, 03:31:50 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
But it is easier to fight abuses when they are right there than several thousand km away...



That is true but who does? (Or did, since my experience goes back about 15 years)

brebis noire

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« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2006, 04:08:57 PM »
There used to be more sewing shops out here in the countryside - there was even one in the little village down the hill at one point. Now the closest one is a few kms down the highway, and it's not going so well these days - I see an empty parking lot a lot of the time.  Not that it's such a great job at the best of times, unless you consider working at a sewing machine all day for 8 something an hour makes a living wage at the end of the month.

I knew a woman from Bulgaria who worked for a short time at this shop in the early 1990s, and she told me the daily working conditions didn't compare well to what she had expererienced in her home country. Also, one day at work she was sewing and the needle went through her fingernail and into the flesh underneath. She just about passed out from the pain. The boss gave her a half-hour to rest, and sent her back to work. At the end of the day when she went to the hospital, they couldn't remove the small piece of needle from her nailbed because too much time had lapsed and the tissue had swollen around it. So she now has a tangible remembrance of her experience in Canadian labour.

A lot of people I know who work in these shops (furniture, clothes, piecework for various types of military machinery and weapons) pin their dreams on someday winning the lottery and being able to join a different sector of society.

But the thing is, these types of jobs have almost been phased out of our economy - they've been moved to China and India, or else get done in the way that Luke has described. So eventually, what we don't know won't hurt us, eh?

deBeauxOs

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Translation please?
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2006, 07:52:29 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
... I will look at Cléo - some of their clothes are too mumsy or power-woman for me, but often one can find something...
True, some of their stuff makes me cringe but then the alternative is Fairweather or any of the other mall stores where most everything is inappropriate.  lagatta, if you are still in the Outaouais on Tuesday, check out Kaliyana's on Sussex, near York street.  There may be some unique end-of-season items on sale.

gunnar gunnarson

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Translation please?
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2006, 10:22:51 PM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Quote from: lagatta
... I will look at Cléo - some of their clothes are too mumsy or power-woman for me, but often one can find something...
True, some of their stuff makes me cringe but then the alternative is Fairweather or any of the other mall stores where most everything is inappropriate.  lagatta, if you are still in the Outaouais on Tuesday, check out Kaliyana's on Sussex, near York street.  There may be some unique end-of-season items on sale.


Oh sure, you can go to Fairweather, but let me pick up a frock there and the next thing I know, it's non-stop kvetching about my shmattes ...

'lance

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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2006, 12:26:40 AM »
Yabbut gunnar... it's the cut of the frock that counts. I don't know how you managed it, but you went to Fairweather and actually managed to find something... skanky.

I mean, my dear fellow. That neckline is the kind of thing you wear to open-heart surgery. Not the done thing atall, atall, what? Mwaha.

lagatta

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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2006, 04:48:38 AM »
Yes, I forgot to go to Kaliyana (I'm back in Montréal) - they also have a shop on Saint Denis. I have some pieces from them - indeed, bought at end-of-season sales as if not they are pricey - but recently I find their clothing is too "imposing" - it would suit a much taller person (whether she is larger or smaller than me in clothing size).

Supposedly it is fair trade.

As for home work, Au bas de l'échelle has been concerned with that problem for years, as have some good activists in the garment workers' union - not a very militant union per se but I knew good people who worked for it in Montréal. It is a very difficult problem to solve - after all, even better-educated home workers such as myself have a hard time organising to defend our rights.

But it isn't true that no activists here have been concerned about the problem of the superexploitation of home workers in garment and related fields.

By the way, "La Meute" is a Québec offshoot of an association founded in France to fight the pervasive sexist publicity over there - interesting, because for a long time even very active and committed feminists in France did not see that as a major problem, but a distraction from the fight for equality and social justice for women. http://www.lameute.fr is the original French organisation, http://www.lameute.org/LaMeute.htm its Québécoise "daughter".

In France, they were "Les CHIENNES de garde" (The Watchbitches) - nice provocative name.  :dog_wagging:  :dog_wagging:  :dog_wagging:
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

lagatta

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« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2006, 07:07:27 AM »
The Guardian has a new article on the subject of "cheap chic", Sweatshop till you drop: http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story ... 80,00.html

Quote
Before the love of cheap chic was being hyped up by the fashionistas, we might have understood that poverty drives people to buy cheap. The morality of the poor exploiting the poor (if you ignore the profiteers in the middle) is certainly more palatable than those with disposable cash buying cheap because it's fashionable.


http://www.labourbehindthelabel.org/
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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Translation please?
« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2006, 08:05:23 AM »
That's a great site, lagatta, Labour behind the Label.

I also really like those Kaliyana designs. Could I activate self enough to trek all the way up there, wherever there is?

Luke

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« Reply #14 on: September 05, 2006, 10:26:34 AM »
I've known Au bas de l'échelle since its founding lagatta and while I may have been *slightly* exaggerating you implicitly acknowlege yourself that not much has been done.

Keep in mind too, a home worker who complains is not likely to keep her/his job for long. The sewing machine might also be "financed" by the entrepreneur who often exploits members of his own 'ethnic' group. It's thus also a question of keeping the tools. So much remains hidden.

As to the schmutte unions .... gimmeee a break! They were not even pussy cats in Montreal 3 decades ago and frequently made deals with manufufacturers.

 

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