Author Topic: Food alerts  (Read 30613 times)

Toedancer

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« Reply #30 on: September 21, 2006, 04:21:06 PM »
Yep, as soon as I heard it was the same strain as Walkertons, all I could think about was the huge dairy farm upriver from Walkerton. They were held to no accountability, still using same practices. Yep.
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fern hill

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« Reply #31 on: October 10, 2006, 08:25:51 AM »
And now carrot juice can kill you too. A story in the Star reports that the stuff was found on the shelves in at least 10 stores in Toronto. :shock:

Maybe this thread should be retitled 'The Scary Food Alert Thread'.


Quote
Toxic carrot juice paralyzes 2 in Toronto

Last Updated: Monday, October 9, 2006 | 1:43 PM ET
CBC News

Two Toronto residents are paralyzed after drinking carrot juice that tested positive for a botulism toxin, according to the city's public health department.

"There are two adults who are severely ill in hospital and they had a history of drinking the exact same juice that's been part of the carrot juice recall," Dr. Elizabeth Rea, an associate medical officer of health, told the Toronto Star on Sunday.


The juice, produced by Bolthouse Farms in Bakersfield, Calif., was ordered off North American store shelves late last month after four cases of botulism in the United States were linked to toxic carrot juice.

A Florida woman has been in hospital, unresponsive, since mid-September. Three people in Georgia suffered respiratory failure and are on ventilators since drinking carrot juice a month ago.



The rest: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2006/10/09/botulism.html

skdadl

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« Reply #32 on: October 10, 2006, 08:50:07 AM »
Oy!

And the juices that are high in acid -- apple juice, eg -- are bad for your teeth, according to my dentist. Well -- a little glass per day won't have much effect, but any more has a very fast bad effect, as I discovered when I was swigging it away through recovery from illness.

Will change title of thread.

Debra

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« Reply #33 on: October 10, 2006, 09:00:24 AM »
also do not buy Foxy lettuce. link
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k'in

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« Reply #34 on: October 10, 2006, 11:55:12 AM »
An article from the current NOW magaizine:

Quote
Investigating the wreckage after an outbreak of food-borne disease is a bit like rummaging through the ruins of a hurricane.
In the rubble, the blameworthy and the innocent are hard to tell apart – and, of course, spin doctors are always among the first at the disaster scene.

There's a long history of food scares being used to increase the concentration of ownership and control in the food industry. The classic example is Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, a book that ended up being used by giant meatpackers to consolidate their triumph over regional abattoirs.

If a safety lesson is to be learned from the spinach mess, it's about the need to prioritize local production, make sure it's done on a scale where natural feedback and control systems have a positive impact and dangerous livestock practices aren't followed.


http://www.nowtoronto.com/issues/2006-1 ... eature.php

lagatta

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« Reply #35 on: October 10, 2006, 12:26:37 PM »
I've seen imported bagged spinach - and other greens - through the summer. Ludicrous.

I've been rinsing some spinach from the Jean-Talon market. Pretty much the tail end of the crop - thick, slightly tough leaves. Very tasty but more suited to slight cooking than use in raw salads.
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Debra

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« Reply #36 on: October 10, 2006, 12:36:08 PM »
This sounds interesting http://www.gardengal.net/page44.html
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

skdadl

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« Reply #37 on: October 10, 2006, 01:55:19 PM »
Heavens. I would think that light would be a problem for most people growing veggies indoors -- heat is a little easier to control.

Debra

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« Reply #38 on: October 10, 2006, 02:00:57 PM »
Depends on the house. the place we are currently renting is about a hundred years old, has huge windows and our half looks west so tons of sunlight.

I thought I might try  a couple of veggies and some herbs.
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skdadl

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« Reply #39 on: October 10, 2006, 02:07:19 PM »
The photo of the radishes made me think, I must say.

I'll bet I'd have better luck with radishes indoors than out. Some critter always comes along and mows down my radish tops just as they're beginning to produce.

I have this dream of having a very high, narrow window in the kitchen, over the sink, replaced with one of those greenhouse windows that juts out a bit. That's the only way that side of the house could get sun (very narrow alley). I could grow radishes there, but those things cost a bomb.

k'in

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« Reply #40 on: October 10, 2006, 02:15:37 PM »
When I removed  my ancient, icy kitchen window I rebuilt it with glass blocks instead (no view there to lose).  I have been able to get basil to grow there.  It is really warm & I dunno, the light comes throught there oddly but seems to work.  Haven't tried anything else.  A greenhouse window would be wonderful.

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #41 on: October 10, 2006, 02:19:14 PM »
I used to grow Thai birdseye chilis under my task light at work.  (actually, I've got a couple growing right now, but they haven't flowered yet).

The Vietnamese restaurant up the street used to have a bowl of chilis in their condiment area, and one day I decided to take one and poke the seeds in some dirt.  They sprouted, flowered and fruited.

I also have the tiniest little sprout of lemongrass, about the size of a regular blade of grass at this point.  Hang in there, li'l guy.
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skdadl

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« Reply #42 on: October 10, 2006, 02:21:30 PM »
Do you have to sex them with a paintbrush?   :shock:

And do you leave the task light on all night?

Debra

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« Reply #43 on: October 10, 2006, 02:24:38 PM »
Quote from: skdadl
Do you have to sex them with a paintbrush?   :shock:

And do you leave the task light on all night?


You can turn the light off if they're shy.  :wink:
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

skdadl

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« Reply #44 on: October 10, 2006, 02:27:48 PM »
Smartypants.  :D

 

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