Author Topic: Afghanistan  (Read 58022 times)

sparqui

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Afghanistan
« Reply #30 on: February 02, 2008, 04:11:59 PM »
This is a powerful analysis of the manufactured "War on Terror". Here is an excerpt of the concluding remarks:

Quote
...In sum, the war on terror is a political gambit and myth used to cover over a U.S. projection of power that needed rhetorical help with the disappearance of the Soviet Union and Cold War. It has been successful because U.S. leaders could hide behind the very real 9/11 terrorist attack and pretend that their own wars, wholesale terrorist actions, and  enlarged support of  a string of countries—many authoritarian and engaged in state terrorism—were somehow linked to that attack and its Al Qaeda authors. But most U.S. military actions abroad since 9/11 have had little or  no connection with Al Qaeda; and you cannot war on a method of  struggle, especially when you, your allies and clients use those methods as well.

 

It is widely argued now that the war on terror has been a failure. This also is a fallacy, resting on the imputation of  purpose to the war’s organizers contrary to their actual aims—they were looking for and found the new “Pearl Harbor” needed to justify a surge of  U.S. force projection across the globe. It appears that Al Qaeda is stronger now than it was on September 11, 2001; but Al Qaeda was never the main target of the Bush administration.  If Al Qaeda had been, the Bush administration would have tried much more seriously to apprehend bin Laden, by military or political action, and it would not have carried out policies in Iraq, Palestine, Pakistan, Iran and elsewhere that have played so well into bin Laden’s hand—arguably, policy responses that bin Laden hoped to provoke. If Washington really had been worried at the post-9/11 terrorist threat it would have followed through on the 9/11 Commission’s recommendations for guarding U.S. territory (ports, chemical plants, nuclear facilities, airports and other transportation hubs, and the like).[45] The fact that it hasn’t done this, but instead has adopted a cynical and politicized system of terrorism alerts, is testimony to the administration's own private understanding of the contrived character of the war on terror and the alleged threats that we face.

 

Admittedly, the surge in power projection that 9/11 and the war on terror facilitated has not been a complete and unadulterated success.  But the “war on terror” gambit did enable this surge to come about, and it should be recognized that  the invasion-occupation of Iraq was not a diversion, its conquest was one of the intended objectives of this war. That conquest may be in jeopardy, but looked at from the standpoint of  its organizers, the war has achieved some of the real goals for which it was designed; and in this critical but seldom appreciated sense it has been a  success. It has facilitated two U.S. military invasions of foreign countries, served to line-up many other states behind the leader of the war, helped once again to push NATO into new, out-of-area operations,  permitted a further advance in the U.S. disregard of international law, helped bring about quasi-regime changes in some major European capitals, and was the basis for the huge growth in U.S. and foreign military budgets. While its destabilization of the Middle East has possibly benefited Iran, it has given Israel a free hand in accelerated ethnic cleansing, settlements, and more ruthless treatment of  the Palestinians, and the United States and Israel still continue to threaten and isolate Iran.

 

Furthermore, with the cooperation of the Democrats and mass media, the “war on terror” gave the “decider” and his clique the political ability to impose an unconstitutional, rightwing agenda at home, at the expense of  the rule of law, economic equality, environmental and other regulation, and social solidarity.  The increased military budget and militarization of U.S. society, the explosive growth in corporate "counter-terrorism" and "homeland security" enterprises, the greater centralization of power in the executive branch, the enhanced inequality, the unimpeded growth of the prison-industrial complex, the more rightwing judiciary, and the failure of  the Democrats to do anything to counter these trends since the 2006 election, suggests that the shift to the right and to a more militarized society and expansionist foreign policy may have become permanent features of life in the United States.  Is that not a war on terror success story, given the aims of  its creators?


http://www.zcommunications.org/znet/viewArticle/16237
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kuri

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Afghanistan
« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2008, 12:16:46 AM »

skdadl

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« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2008, 08:27:23 AM »
So far, so good, although he and his family are still in some danger, and I assume he is still in custody somewhere? Still, a victory for diplomacy. If only Harper would learn how to conduct such -- there are people in Ottawa capable, but he and his crew just swagger all over them.

Toedancer

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Afghanistan
« Reply #33 on: February 13, 2008, 01:22:50 PM »
I've never seen this blog before, have no idea how accurate it is. But I certainly wonder after reading this article

Will NATO Die at The Gates of Kabul?

if the Generals are desperate enough to keep NATO alive, Shades of the Cold War, or more fucking propaganda?

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/homepage/story/27437.html
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arborman

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Afghanistan
« Reply #34 on: February 13, 2008, 05:31:11 PM »
The key words in the linked article are 'Lyndon Larouche', which is a giant red flag for bizarroland world history interpretation, xenophobia, anglophobia and a range of other utterly inane assertions couched in plausible terms.

The first couple of paragraphs were interesting, but if it is spawned from the Larouche people I wouldn't give it enormous credibility without additional sources.
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skdadl

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #35 on: May 01, 2008, 07:05:21 PM »
I wonder whether they've told Steve? AP/Newsweek:

Quote
Pentagon officials are quietly considering a significant change in the war command in Afghanistan to extend US control of forces into the country's volatile south. The idea is partly linked to an expectation of a fresh infusion of US combat troops in the south next year.

Taliban resistance has stiffened in the south since NATO took command there in mid-2006, and some in the Bush administration believe the fight against the Taliban could be strengthened if the US, whose span of control is now limited to eastern Afghanistan, were also in charge in part or all of the south.

The internal discussions about expanding the US command role were described in recent Associated Press interviews with several senior defense officials who have direct knowledge but were not authorized to talk about it publicly. All said they thought it unlikely that a decision would be made anytime soon.

Giving the US more control in the south would address one problem cited by US officials: the NATO allies' practice of rotating commanders every nine months — and their fighting units every six months, in some cases. The 101st Airborne, by comparison, is in eastern Afghanistan on a 15-month deployment. In the US view, nine-month commands are too short to maximize effectiveness.

See also Tim's post at POGGE re the willingness of the CF in Afghanistan to do some low-level negotiating with local Taliban, in spite of the fact that our ministers back home are still reciting the slogans from Steve's script.

Toedancer

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #36 on: May 04, 2008, 01:47:38 PM »
Remember the assassination attempt on Karzai on April 27th? As skdadl says the wheels are coming off.

KABUL -- The Afghan Defence minister says two government employees have been arrested, accused of being involved in a plot to kill President Hamid Karzai.

Abdul Rahim Wardak says a police nurse and a Defense Ministry weapons expert have been detained. They are alleged to have supported the gunmen who targeted Karzai at an April 27 military parade.

Karzai escaped unharmed, but three other people, including a lawmaker, were killed in the attack.

Wardak told a news conference that two assault rifles used in the assassination attempt were government-issued weapons.

ctv
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Toedancer

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #37 on: June 13, 2008, 05:22:59 PM »
Taliban fighters escape in daring attack on Afghan prison-Telegraph  :shock:

In an apparently well-planned and coordinated attack, a water tanker lorry carrying explosives was detonated outside the prison gates, opening the prison for at least one more suicide bomber to run inside and detonated more bombs.

The explosions crumbled two walls made of mud, crushing several police officers and guards. Meanwhile, up to militants on motorbikes fired rockets at the complex, causing mass confusion and allowing inmates to escape into the night.


Ah....mud walls? Billions and billions of dollars and they hold the Taliban with mud walls?
Something very wrong with this picture.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

skdadl

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #38 on: June 14, 2008, 09:42:00 AM »
Bloody hell.

Note the title on the G&M's report: Taliban strike frees hordes from prison.

Hordes? Excuse me? Katherine O'Neill, honey, you gotta problem, or your editors do. That is disgusting, would be anywhere, but the G&M should know better.

fern hill

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #39 on: June 14, 2008, 10:07:33 AM »
Wasn't it the Glob that committed 'socialist hoards'? On the front page no less?

skdadl

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #40 on: June 14, 2008, 10:15:13 AM »
:lol:

I don't know -- I didn't see that -- wish I had. It is true that during one NDP campaign years ago, we had wonderful buttons that read "I am a member of the socialist hordes." Everyone enjoyed those.

fern hill

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #41 on: June 14, 2008, 10:20:06 AM »
It seems to be a common error: 'socialist hoards'. I didn't see the Glob on a quick scan.

skdadl

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #42 on: June 14, 2008, 11:21:12 AM »
Gosh -- the numbers on the break-out are going up by the minute -- some sources now say over a thousand.

Toedancer

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #43 on: June 14, 2008, 11:50:13 AM »
Every time I read more about this I just can't help but insert the Wild Wild West Frontier scenarios. Most of the escapees are regular AFghan civilians who committed petty crimes, and I wonder if they were separated from the 400 or so Taliban insurgents.
It's the mud walls I can't stop thinking about. In the wild west they could be pulled apart by strong horses and some rope, in Kandahar they used Water Tanker packed with explosives. There were motorscotters/bikes/minibuses waiting for the Taliban to hop onto (behind prison), like horses, to make their escape. The petty criminals ran into the pomegranate + grape fields, and of course I couldn't help but see Clooney running thru corn fields. I know this is serious stuff, but it's turned into comedy for me.

Oh and I guess the spin has started already by the Can/nato generals.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

anne cameron

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Re: Afghanistan: five years ago today ... and today
« Reply #44 on: June 14, 2008, 01:16:01 PM »
I like the part about the women escaping , the ones who had been imprisoned for attempting to escape abusive husbands.

What was that line about winning the hearts and minds....?

Sort'a puts me in mind of "Blazing Saddles".

 

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