Author Topic: North Korea  (Read 5925 times)

Toedancer

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North Korea
« on: October 14, 2006, 06:25:02 PM »
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CTV's Steve Chao, reporting from Seoul, said the mood is tense near the border between the north and south amid uncertainty about what North Korean leader Kim Jong Il will do next.

"The military here really are very serious this week about trying to get their troops ready in the case of a nuclear war," Chao told CTV Newsnet.

"That is still a very distant possibility; however, military generals here in South Korea really want their soldiers prepared because right across the border are one million soldiers who could possibly attack South Korea."

Possibly in a show of force, the U.S. military recently held an open house at its base in South Korea, showing off a formidable weapons arsenal, Chao said.


There were 26,000 U.S. troops at the border on Wed. night, I just bet more were flown in since then. This doesn't look good at all. Sorry to bring this up on the weekend.

http://tinyurl.com/y5zhh6  (CTV)

And two more Canadians were killed in Afghanistan.  :cry:
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

sparqui

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North Korea
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2006, 10:57:36 PM »
Frightening times. There are also huge bases in nearby Japan and a new President that is keen to militarize.
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

fern hill

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North Korea
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2006, 09:53:50 AM »
I just heard Adrian Hong of LiNK interviewed on CBC's Sunday Morning. Amazing guy. LiNK is running a modern Underground Railway to get people out of North Korea.

Here is a bit of its mission statement. But go to the site to learn more.

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LiNK stands for Liberty in North Korea. It is a non-profit, non-partisan, non-ethnic and non-religious group formed in pursuit of the following mission statement:

To educate the world about North Korea.
To advocate for human rights, political and religious freedom, and humanitarian aid for North Korea.
To empower citizens of the world to take effective action and make a difference.
To bring together and support existing NGOs and other organizations working to achieve the same ends.
To tell the world the truth.

LiNK was founded on March 27, 2004, at the Eighteenth Annual Korean American Students Conference, held at Yale University, in New Haven, CT. It was created first to educate Korean American students throughout the nation about the sufferings of the North Korean people and the political context in which they are situated.

Since then, it has grown to encompass much more. It is no longer limited to Korean Americans, or students for that matter. It has in fact grown to include people of all walks in life, of all ethnic and religious backgrounds, and all parts of the globe, all pressing for the same cause- liberty for the North Korean people.



http://www.linkglobal.org/

Luke

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North Korea
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2006, 10:31:10 PM »
sorry, my mistake

Croghan27

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Re: North Korea
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2010, 04:52:12 PM »
My father was a mechanical engineer ..... he was interested in machines ..... he specialized in ships, boats and working craft .... he designed dredges and a tug boat or two. He was interested in sailing things.

I recall him musing about "The Maine". The popular story was that it was sunk (a la USS Cole) by the Spanish, and was used as an justification for the Spanish/American War. He would not make a judgment upon how it was sunk as hard evidence was just not available. (It was mostly obscured by the Luce people beating the war drums.)

That may be a blueprint for what is going on now in Korea. The US and S. Korea (the land of Sun Myung Moon) are demanding an apology from N. Korea for the sinking.

B-b-b-but .... whereas dear old Dad did not have access to The Maine (recent investigations have shown it's sinking has more to do with poor seamanship that sabotage), access to this Cheonan is available.

One (since fired) member of the panel looking into the sinking has taken a "I don't think so, Tim." position.

Not that this matter very much ... remember Disaster Capitalism??? Well, everybody favourite, Rahm Emanuel has adopted that paradigm:
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You never want a serious crisis to go to waste. Things that   we had postponed for too long, that were long-term, are now immediate   and must be dealt with. This crisis provides the opportunity for us to   do things that you could not do before."

This, of course, just after someone (Jimmy Carter) had the cojones (those things that Harper will never have especially when speaking of Khadr) to just go to them and ask that they release an American they felt had illegally entered their country. (Did not Clinton do damn near the same thing just a while ago for a couple of women??)

Funny how things happen when you stop with the threats and start with the talking .... Churchill had a lot of faults ..but when he said: To jaw-jaw is always better than to war-war he had a point.

American Everyman is doing a lot of posting about the situation.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Toedancer

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Re: North Korea
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2011, 12:03:26 AM »
Dear Leader  has died at the age of 69, state-run television has announced.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-16239693
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Boom Boom

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Re: North Korea
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2011, 10:16:06 AM »
The North Koreans sure know how to stage a military funeral. I'm watching the procession on CNN - looks to be a mile long, military in their green uniforms all along the route, huge masses of people doing the obligatory crying. Don't know if the actual funeral service will be shown, if there is one. Maybe just the procession?
 
 
ETA: I want to be careful not to parrot MSM talking points about North Korea, but there's a lot of opulence on display. While the hearse and funeral cars are black 1970s Mercurys and Lincolns, those are followed (in the procession) by about three dozen new black  Mercedes Benzes. The 21-gun slaute by about 100 soldiers - a lot of smoke from the gun barrels, suggesting to me that those are not new weapons being fired, or else they're using poorly-manufactured ammo. Modern rifles are virtually smokeless.
 
 
 
« Last Edit: December 28, 2011, 11:00:45 AM by Boom Boom »

Boom Boom

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Re: North Korea
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2012, 08:12:02 PM »
  Rocket launch in NK being reported on CNN - early stages:
1. Launch successful.
2. Rocket possibly broke up maybe a minute after launch.
3. Third nuclear test may happen soon in conjunction with this launch on 100th anniversary of first Kim.
4. Clinton announces food aid to NK will be shut down because NK was warned not to do this in violation of UN security council resolutions.
5. UN security council emergency meeting tomorrow to discuss more sanctions against NK.
6. Japanese ships combing waters for debris - any debris found will tell something about make-up of this rocket.
7. Japan saying rocket failed even before first stage completed. Japan and South Korea just confirmed the rocket failed one minute after launch.
8. Japanese had Patriot missile batteries aimed at rocket in case it started to fall towards Japanese territory - they were prepared to shoot it down if necessary.
 9. Rocket used 1960s Soviet technology. Failure of the rocket a huge embarrassment for NK on their centenary (Kim).
(as mentioned this is all from CNN - so proper caution needed)

Toedancer

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Re: North Korea
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2013, 11:13:13 AM »
General Thurman, U.S. Commander in South Korea is not going to Wash. for committee hearings. So I guess things might be srs.   http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/04/07/uk-korea-north-usa-visit-idUKBRE9360E420130407


Obama has said he'll use 'proportional' weaponry if war breaks out, tit for tat, won't go full out nuklear. It's called counter-provocation  ::)   http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/04/07/uk-korea-north-usa-visit-idUKBRE9360E420130407


No real reporting going on, just parroting the war drums, I imagine if war does break out it will short and intense. The stupid reigns on, it would be so ironic if the U.S. deploys nukes to stop nuclearization under the tit for tat war policy. I can't imagine the radiation fall-out.




"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Boom Boom

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Re: North Korea
« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2013, 06:52:01 AM »
from the second story on this page (about halfway down)
 
“Damn, what do we have to do to get those North Korean fellows to trust us?”
 
Well, they could start by ending the many international sanctions they impose on North Korea. They could discontinue arming and training South Korean military forces. And they could stop engaging in provocative fly-overs, ships cruising the waters, and military exercises along with South Korea, Australia, and other countries dangerously close to the North. The Wall Street Journal reported:
  The first show of force came on March 8, during the U.S.-South Korean exercise, known as Foal Eagle, when long-range B-52 bombers conducted low-altitude maneuvers. A few weeks later, in broad daylight, two B-2 bombers sent from a Missouri air base dropped dummy payloads on a South Korean missile range.
U.S. intelligence agencies, as had been planned, reviewed the North’s responses. After those flights, the North responded as the Pentagon and intelligence agencies had expected, with angry rhetoric, threatening to attack the South and the U.S.
On Sunday, the U.S. flew a pair of advanced F-22s to South Korea, which prompted another angry response from the North. 5
 
 
And the United States could stop having wet dreams about North Korea collapsing, enabling the US to establish an American military base right at the Chinese border.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2013, 06:54:44 AM by Boom Boom »

 

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