Author Topic: autumn chill food thread  (Read 26361 times)

Boom Boom

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #60 on: November 04, 2006, 07:56:12 AM »
Growing up in my family of origin the only time we used 'foods of convenience' was Saturday, when everyone had plans to be elsewhere other than at home. Sunday was always a big dinner production, I guess we were old fasioned that way, but me mudder went all out to have a big Sunday meal at suppertime. I miss those days, although until I retired I usually got invited out quite a bit for Sunday dinners with local families, and these have usually been big productions. Being in the protection racket gets you a lot of respect and invitations (get youse arm broken if you don't show some kindness my way - just kidding!). Anyway, I've kept to a regime of not using convenience (packaged) foods unless I'm feeling lazy or tired. And, I have a good sized summer garden, with a new greenhouse on the way. I expect to be working in each probably every day from mid-May right to October, pulling out weeds, adjusting the soil, and generally just being over-concerned with how the garden is doing. :lol:

lagatta

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #61 on: November 04, 2006, 09:47:42 AM »
Junk was a treat when I was small too, not that we ate as well as Sleeping Sun's family. I was jealous of friends whose parents kept things like potato chips in the house... as skdadl and Boom Boom will remember, those things existed, but weren't nearly as common as they are today.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

fern hill

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #62 on: November 04, 2006, 09:53:18 AM »
I moved to Canada  when I was seven. Food is terribly important to kids, and the differences were fascinating. The most amazing thing about Canada to me was that potato chips could be delivered to one's home in a big metal can. Not that we got them, of course.

Our next-door neighbours had 'junk dinner' once a week. Hot dogs, potato chips, bliss, envy.

skdadl

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #63 on: November 04, 2006, 10:09:38 AM »
Herr Magoo had mentioned the tinned Thai soups one can find in supermarkets now, so yesterday I got one and gave it a test run at suppertime. The kind I got was called Yellow Curry Soup with Vegetables, made by a company called Y and Y. That ring any bells, Herr M?

It was tasty enough but, for me, overpoweringly too sweet. I don't know whether that's just a limitation of these tinned things or whether Thai cookery is generally sweeter than I can take, but that was too sweet.

The vegetables were ok (heavy on the potatoes, but some interesting other things, and not already approaching mush, as they would be in most NA commercial soups).

lagatta

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« Reply #64 on: November 04, 2006, 10:22:43 AM »
Yeah, some of the otherwise lovely prepared Thai foods I've had are indeed too sweet... If I recall, the President's Choice Thai Soup of all things - it is made in Thailand - was not bad, perhaps adjusted for those silly Westerners.

For a change in pace, the Glob style section is doing up a lavish dinner party: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/entertaining
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Boom Boom

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« Reply #65 on: November 04, 2006, 10:45:32 AM »
We made our own chips, slicing potatoes thin, and deep frying them in Mazola or Crisco oil, which were staples back then (the 50s and 60s). Another treat was several different kinds of cereal, Cheerios and Shreddies  (shredded wheat) sprinkled liberally with oil, and roasted (very briefly), and salted when taken out of the oven. Yum!

ETA: I don't think we appreciated the danger of too much salt back then.  :(

Herr Magoo

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #66 on: November 04, 2006, 05:49:06 PM »
Quote
That ring any bells, Herr M?


I think so.  If they came in several colours (red, green, yellow, blue) then, and if you can bear it, try the red.  I think the red was always my favourite.

Tonight I'm sauteeing some mushrooms and shallots to stuff some butterflied chicken breasts.  I'm also making a cream sauce for the top.  This is the kind of thing I love about autumn.

On the subject of convenience foods, I'll be plating up these lovely chicken breasts with some instant mashed potatoes, and some frozen corn.  Why?  Well, not because I won't make the effort.  Who'd bother sauteeing fresh vegetables for 45 minutes if they wouldn't boil a potato?  Sometimes we just like the junk.  Discuss.  :)
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lagatta

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« Reply #67 on: November 04, 2006, 06:26:50 PM »
That is funny. Instant mash is also very popular in France, and comes in different flavours. Think it is called mousseline?

I don't hate it by any means, but I'm trying to eat low GI. However I certainly understand.

This afternoon I made a tart with (tinned) artichokes, mild onions, goat ricotta and goat feta, Italian-type-ham-end-at a-deep-discount - Milano, a fancy Italian grocery in my 'hood, sells off ends of charcuterie at less than half price - in this case, a hunk originally priced almost $3 for $1.25 - a couple of eggs. It is sort of like a quiche but with far more vegetable (and in this case also meat) matter, just enough egg to hold it together.

I almost always use a yeasted olive oil crust:
Yeasted Tart Dough with Olive Oil
2 teaspoons active dry yeast
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 cup warm water
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 egg, lightly beaten
3/8 teaspoon salt
1 3/4 cups flour, as needed
Makes one 9-, 10-, or 11-inch tart, pie or galette, 6 to 8 individual shells

I make this by heart; think I use a bit more flour and water, don't add any more egg. It makes enough for at least two tarts - I roll it very thin.

I don't use sugar (it rises anyway) and with the feta and ham, sure didn't add any more salt!
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Boom Boom

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #68 on: November 04, 2006, 07:13:56 PM »
I haven't used instant mash in quite a while because leftover mash is difficult to use, and I don't like the taste, anyway. I live by myself and boiling three potatoes or so for mash is a snap for me, and fresh mash tastes great, gravy or no gravy. I had black bean soup for supper because I'm too tired from helping install the shower stall to bother with a real meal.

k'in

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #69 on: November 05, 2006, 04:57:26 PM »
Herr Magoo wrote:

Quote
Why? Well, not because I won't make the effort. Who'd bother sauteeing fresh vegetables for 45 minutes if they wouldn't boil a potato? Sometimes we just like the junk. Discuss.


One thing I'm always been curious about is how discriminating the average palate really is.  I took a few cooking lessons from a chef neighbour.  She is totally down to earth and not pretentious at all when the topic isn't food, yet, she would go on and on about the importance of always using "authentic" ingredients.  Otherwise, it would "show" in the final dish.  OK, it's always better to use fresh herbs, but it's a pretty tall order to cook a roast beef so you can siphon off a teaspoon of real beef gravy for a recipe.  I'm thinking that the vast majority of the population, even the most hoity-toity of bozos, couldn't tell the difference. Chefs disagree with this; then again they are food experts.  

Anyhow, dinner tonight (while mostly authentic will include a tsp. of pretendia gravy) is turkey scallopini Marsala with mangoes & green peppercorns.  Organic amaranth, short grain brown Lundberg rice & broccoli on the side.  A different twist on Italian.

skdadl

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #70 on: November 05, 2006, 05:14:18 PM »
My mashed-potato prejudice:

Me mudder (thanks, Boom Boom  :wink:  ) always used the kind of masher that leaves large chunks of potato intact, so mashes that are more what I think of as whipped potatoes kind of turn me off, and the instant ones are like that, yes/no?

I will do instant all kinds of other things, but if I'm eating taters/tatties, I like a little texture.

Even better than plain lumpy mashed tatties is Colcannon, which is boiled cabbage mixed into the tatties. Yum.

Boom Boom

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #71 on: November 05, 2006, 05:22:04 PM »
Quote from: skdadl
Even better than plain lumpy mashed tatties is Colcannon, which is boiled cabbage mixed into the tatties. Yum.


I love mixing in boiled turnip, rutabaga, or carrot in with my mash. Sometimes all three - it's freakin' delicious! A bit of onion, too. If you mash all these ingredients together, you have a meal in iself, no need of meat or a side of vegiies.

k'in

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autumn chill food thread
« Reply #72 on: November 05, 2006, 08:16:32 PM »
I like the chunky mashed potatoes.  My Mom makes them that way (probably to rebel against her mother who always did the whipped to perfection model).  Boom Boom-I like that combination too.  Somewhere (probably earlier on this thread) I posted the layered potato/turnip/carrot (& sometimes even apple) recipe my paternal grandmother used to make.  It was easy to do and covered off all those vegetables in one dish.

 

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