Author Topic: Difference between men’s and women’s mags  (Read 29670 times)

deBeauxOs

  • Guest
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« on: October 31, 2006, 12:02:25 PM »
Hey kids!  I just came across this discussion regarding the, ah .... virtues of magazines geared towards a female or male audience.  I particularly liked this bit.
Quote
Here’s the big problem. Men’s magazines are written to make men feel good about themselves. Women’s magazines are written to make you feel like there is something — many things — wrong with you that need fixing. Women’s magazines are really heavy on advice, which is intended to come across as “girlfriendy.” But after a while I wonder why the editors think I’m such a moron that I need to be told the correct way to apply blush in every single issue? It’s not that men’s magazines don’t offer advice, but the tone is different. ...  And the tone of the advice is like: “Dude, if you learn how to iron a shirt/mix a martini/fix a tire/cook a meal, you are so gonna get laid!” With women’s mags, it’s like: “Honey, if you lose the saddlebags, stop acting so needy and tweeze properly, there’s a chance you won’t die alone.”


Anyhoo - a good jumping off point for a riff on what we like/dislike about popular mags.

Caissa

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2982
    • View Profile
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2006, 12:25:57 PM »
I read Walrus, Harpers, National Geographic and Chess Magazines. I don't think any of them are gendered. From the headlines on "Women's" magazines which I see when purchasing groceries, the author may have a point.

What are examples of "Men's" magazines?

Bacchus

  • Anya's Daddy-The Only Title than Matters
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1398
    • View Profile
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2006, 12:27:35 PM »
Maxim, GQ
When you're on your own
When you're at a fork in the road
You don't know which way to go
There's too many signs and arrows
You haven't laughed in a while
When you can't even fake a smile
When you feel ashamed...
The uniform don't make you brave

chcmd

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 297
    • View Profile
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2006, 12:34:58 PM »
The only mag I read these days is Scientific American.  I have no interest in "womens" magazines, as I find them offensive (as described above).

I will admit to a sick facination with rags such as the "Inquirer", and will peek at them in the grocery lineup :oops:
Feel the fear and do it anyway

Debra

  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11228
    • View Profile
    • April Reign
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2006, 12:40:40 PM »
I flipped through a fashion magazine the other day, and was appalled.

If I read that sort of thing all the time I would have no self esteem whatsoever.

The shoes one MUST wear look like something out of dominatrix porn, and anything low or comfortable is "too be worn in the garden or privacy of one's home" Well yes I wouldn't want to offend anyone by not appearing to be crippled by my shoes.  :rant2
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

deBeauxOs

  • Guest
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2006, 12:58:47 PM »
Quote from: Debra
... The shoes one MUST wear look like something out of dominatrix porn, and anything low or comfortable is "too be worn in the garden or privacy of one's home" Well yes I wouldn't want to offend anyone by not appearing to be crippled by my shoes.
That's just style.  You are making a statement when wearing pointy-toed, stiletto-heeled footwear.  'These are hurtin' shoes.'  'Got a problem with that?'

lagatta

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13093
    • View Profile
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2006, 01:05:04 PM »
I confess I do like looking at purty clothes, so I do flip through women's magazines (at the public library, at newsagents', etc.) Don't buy them. I did buy Marie Claire years ago (the original French one, not any of the offshoots). It was an odd magazine in that it had a lot of "serious" and in many ways feminist content alongside the fashion shoots.

Aren't there quite a few fashionable low-heeled shoes nowadays? Of course ballerina flats are not necessarily comfy for serious walking, even in cities, as they have thin soles and little to no arch support. I do like shoes of that type for parties, though.

I do like clothes, but can't afford what I'd like to buy. And yes, many of the women's magazines feature clothing that only suits a very few young women - but then, even clothing shops have that problem - there is a huge bulge (sorry) of boomers many of whom do have some money to spend, but few attractive clothes on offer. Many women over 40 don't really fit into such clothes, even if they are not overweight.

Often I find nothing in shops between what a (non-existent) daughter would wear and what my mum might wear...

bitch, bitch, bitch...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

chcmd

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 297
    • View Profile
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2006, 01:11:06 PM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Quote from: Debra
... The shoes one MUST wear look like something out of dominatrix porn, and anything low or comfortable is "too be worn in the garden or privacy of one's home" Well yes I wouldn't want to offend anyone by not appearing to be crippled by my shoes.
That's just style.  You are making a statement when wearing pointy-toed, stiletto-heeled footwear.  'These are hurtin' shoes.'  'Got a problem with that?'


Reminds me of that bit Steve Martin used to do, called "Cruel Shoes" :lol:
Feel the fear and do it anyway

skdadl

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32874
    • View Profile
    • http://www.pogge.ca
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2006, 01:11:36 PM »
That's an interesting exchange between Onstad and Giese, and I hate to do this, really I do, but ...

Esquire was once a great magazine, y'know? And for a long time, too. I still have their fiftieth-anniversary issue (1983) around here somewhere -- it is literature.

The current Esquire that Onstad and Giese are talking about -- as so much better than women's mags -- is toilet paper compared to what Esquire used to be. So that tells us quite a bit about the women's mags too, doesn't it?

These days I would say that Vanity Fair and sometimes Vogue have taken over the publishing that Esquire did in its several heydays. And of course the New Yorker is always itself. Esquire just overdosed on trendy-cute and has never recovered -- such a shame, but I wouldn't waste money on it.

When I was a teenager I was simply smitten for a time by several of the big American magazines for teen girls, Seventeen especially. Well, we all were. In the generation ahead of mine, eg, both Sylvia Plath and Joan Didion won internships at Mademoiselle magazine. It was a way to start, anyway, for a girl who wanted to write and who was also trying to live up to that kind of public style, which I guess younger people would recognize now as preppie.

It was preppie -- sort of tailored and heather-muted and handsome rather than sexy. I don't remember that the images in Seventeen made me feel deficient in the way that women's fashion advertising ever since has. It was a style that was its own kind of lie, though, I guess, more class-envious than sex-blatant.

  • Guest
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2006, 01:19:21 PM »
A housemate of my in university had 'em (women's magazines) lying all over the living room.  There was an article about women's butts [the author was told by a group of men that her 'booty' need 'plumping' and she wrote about how vexed she was at hearing this news ("my butt c'est moi" is how she put it.)] ... after that bit of stimulating read, there was another story with a full page illustration accompanying it (an insipid painting of a guy from the back, standing in front of the toilet) and the article was about how guys pee.  With interviews.

I couldn't stand much more of that.

I read some guy mags once, ... there was an article about how to blow women's minds in bed.  Turned out to be no big deal.  Change positions now and then and have sex in a different room for variety.  Guy sounded like he was working under a deadline.

I did like a review for the movie (coming out on DVD) "Billy Jack," saying that "he put the 'fist' in 'pacifist.'"

The women's magazines (Cosmo?) seem to promise diet tips and how to have smoking hot sex pretty much every month.

They're all a lot of stupid ads and consumerist drivel.  Fuck them all, I loath them with a frightening passion.  RAARRRRRR!!!!!


... i didn't know how else to wrap this up ....    :oops:

Debra

  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11228
    • View Profile
    • April Reign
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2006, 01:22:04 PM »
in a brown paper wrapper.....
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

lagatta

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13093
    • View Profile
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2006, 01:24:01 PM »
Yeah, way back when Cosmo pretty much had the handle on "sexy" fashion, in the blatant sense.

And both Chatelaine and Châtelaine used to publish fiction and other literary efforts... Chatelaine - links to Châtelaine
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Herr Magoo

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2297
    • View Profile
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2006, 01:43:11 PM »
A long time ago, a buddy lent me some copies of "Men's Health" magazine, which is a guy mag, but not quite on par wth the "lads" mags that are all about actresses in lingerie.  Some parts were interesting, with good health tips, grooming, etc., but there was a lot of emphasis on clothing and working out.  And cigars and single malt scotch.

Chick mags, on the other hand, I've seen all my life.  I used to, out of boredom, read my grandmother's "Family Circle" and "Woman's Day" magazines, so I'm quite familiar with the idea of "Thin Thighs In Thirty Days" on page 28, and "100 Sinful Chocolate Recipes" on page 29.
ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,

Tommy Shanks

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 202
    • View Profile
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2006, 02:05:45 PM »
Quote
"100 Sinful Chocolate Recipes" on page 29.


That's the thing I notice most about so-called female mags, the constant reference to the 832 things you can do to fix your hair, and the 1,276 better ways to improve your sex life, and the 13,862 hottest trends this fall.

Why the need to numerate? Why in so arbitrary a fashion? Why?

I've ofetn wanted to buy one that claims some absurd number of tips for something or other, obsessively count them all, and then sue said magazine for wrongful advertising. I know, I'm incredibly pathetic.
We are the mods, we are the mods, we are, we are, we are the mods.

John_D

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 582
    • View Profile
Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2006, 03:28:33 PM »
Quote from: Tommy Shanks
That's the thing I notice most about so-called female mags, the constant reference to the 832 things you can do to fix your hair, and the 1,276 better ways to improve your sex life, and the 13,862 hottest trends this fall.

Why the need to numerate? Why in so arbitrary a fashion? Why?


I've always assumed it was just plain old competition. "Those bastards at Vogue had 27 great spring haircuts last month. We'll show 'em! We'll have 28!

Oh, and make up new names for the same six sex positions we talk up in every issue."

 

Return To TAT