Author Topic: Difference between men’s and women’s mags  (Read 29665 times)

brebis noire

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Difference between men’s and women’s mags
« Reply #30 on: November 01, 2006, 09:13:46 AM »
Quote
I watched a few early Burt Reynolds flicks, especially those with Sally Field, but lost interest in him when he starred as a porn producer or director in a flick whose name I happily can't remember.


Well that's funny. I was a kid in the 1970s and Burt Reynolds was just a name - when I finally watched a movie or two of his from back then, I wondered why he was so successful. But I saw him in Boogie Nights, and thought he was pretty good after all, in a role with some pathos.

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #31 on: November 01, 2006, 10:30:06 AM »
Quote from: Boom Boom
I watched a few early Burt Reynolds flicks, especially those with Sally Field, but lost interest in him when he starred as a porn producer or director in a flick whose name I happily can't remember. He came across as such a dirty old man - ugh.  ...
Well that was the way the porn producer role in "Boogie Nights" was written and it is to Burt's credit that he did justice to it.  I believe that he was even nominated for an Oscar.  I greatly admire Julianne Moore and her acting range - in a way, she takes risks like Meryl Streep does, playing against type and often, not very sympathetic characters.  She was in "Boogie Nights" and more recently "Freedomland", a riveting film.

About Vanity Fair ... remember the hoo-haw about the cover that featured Keira Knightley and Scarlett Johansson completely naked and a fully clothed Tom Ford?  Ontario-born Rachel McAdam was the third actress booked for this little montage and when informed of Ford's stylistic "vision" for the photographs, she walked out.

brebis noire

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« Reply #32 on: November 01, 2006, 10:38:52 AM »
Well Boom Boom might have been referring to Burt's comeback role in Striptease, in which he did come off as a dirty old man, though not a porn producer. More the Republican senator type.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #33 on: November 01, 2006, 10:41:45 AM »
Yes, it sounds like I got the two mixed up. I didn't sit through either one.

ETA: I subscribe to The Movie Network,, as I live in an isolated area, and no movie theatres here. Often I just leave the satellite on TMN and just glance at some of the offerings or change the channel. While I was out in Sept Iles, I found that I enjoyed the Discovery Channel and CMT, and likely will subscribe to each this week.

k'in

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« Reply #34 on: November 01, 2006, 11:01:40 AM »
deBeauxOs wrote:

Quote
About Vanity Fair ... remember the hoo-haw about the cover that featured Keira Knightley and Scarlett Johansson completely naked and a fully clothed Tom Ford? Ontario-born Rachel McAdam was the third actress booked for this little montage and when informed of Ford's stylistic "vision" for the photographs, she walked out.


We let our subscription to Rolling Stone lapse after it became apparent there was a double standard when it came to whether the featured cover artist was male or female.  The female artists seemed to be posed semi-naked and provocatively while the male artists were presented pretty much the same way they appeared on stage.

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #35 on: November 01, 2006, 11:15:40 AM »
Does anyone here remember 'Sassy'?  I believe that it was started with some input from 'Ms' and it flourished during the late 80's, when my daughter entered her teen years.  It tried really hard to be a girl-positive magazine, challenging the status quo and refusing to carry the usual advertising that exploit young women.  It folded in the 90's and its founder/editor, Jane Pratt went on to create Jane.  It has since caved in to what is considered popular wisdom in the women's mags publishing business and now carries all the same offensive ads, stories and photographs that other such mags do.

brebis noire

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« Reply #36 on: November 01, 2006, 11:30:13 AM »
I vaguely remember Sassy, but the title was enough to put me off. It sounds like something a 7-year-old girl might like to read.

The thing about so-called women's magazines are that their target demographics are tricked. You might read Seventeen and Mademoiselle when you're thirteen, and Glamour and Cosmo when you're 17, and maybe Chatelaine in your 20s, but by the time you're 30, there's nothing left except Good Housekeeping and Coup de Pouce (which is the preferred mag for 30-yr-old women where I live.)

I stopped paying attention a long time ago. If I pick one up in a waiting room, the only thing I read are the interviews.

lagatta

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« Reply #37 on: November 01, 2006, 11:37:17 AM »
"Marie pas claire" was/is a radical "libertaire" (anarchist or thereabouts, on the left, not like "libertarian" in English) retort to the glossy bourgeois feminism of "Marie Claire" - as I'd said, the original French one used to have some excellent writing, though it has really gone downhill - I think in general such magazines play to a reduced attention span. Was a zine, sometimes comes out, irregularly, I think.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Scout

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« Reply #38 on: November 01, 2006, 11:49:13 AM »
Marie Claire has openly refocussed reccently. Maybe 2 issues ago? And it's much more like it's old self.

lagatta

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« Reply #39 on: November 01, 2006, 11:57:50 AM »
Scout, do you mean the original Marie Claire (from France) or one of the spinoffs (US and UK) in English?
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Holly Stick

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« Reply #40 on: November 01, 2006, 12:05:06 PM »
I was 16 when that photo of Reynolds came out, the first nude male photo in an American magazine, I think.  There was quite a bit of fuss at the time.  I always liked that silly smile on his face, like he was not taking it at all seriously.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Scout

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« Reply #41 on: November 02, 2006, 09:13:37 AM »
I'm not sure about the other Marie Claire's, including the original but the American one is the one I get and it's re-foucussed, I would hope they all have.

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #42 on: November 02, 2006, 09:44:55 AM »
Anyone remember Mirabella, published by Grace Mirabella?  Mrs. Magoo actually subscribed to it for a while.  Smart, and without a whole lot of "Please your man by losing weight through sex" nonsense.  

It folded.
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deBeauxOs

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« Reply #43 on: November 02, 2006, 10:43:19 AM »
Quote from: Herr Magoo
Anyone remember Mirabella ...
Indeed I do.  Wasn't there another mag competing for the same market/audience around the same time ... late 80's?  Called Lear, founded by Frances Lear who used part of her $112 million divorce settlement from Norman for that purpose.  It wasn't as good as Mirabella though, which was smart and bright, with great journalism.

ETA - Frances was the inspiration for the character 'Maude'.

lagatta

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« Reply #44 on: November 02, 2006, 12:15:26 PM »
Here is a comment piece by women journalists at Marie Claire about the discrepancy between the mag's feminist discourse and the treatment of its writers.

Marie-Claire used to have a lot more pages of journalistic writing and investigative reporting than it does now - like all the other women's magazines with some intellectual or feminist pretences, it seems to have completely fallen into vapidity:

Les faces cachées de Marie-Claire

I've never read the US one.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

 

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