Author Topic: Not Really  (Read 16386 times)

Boom Boom

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« Reply #15 on: November 14, 2006, 07:46:25 PM »
Well, not explicitly, it's implied, with a woman and a man entering a house together, and the Viagra pill shown at the end. Edited to correct a faulty memory.

skdadl

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« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2006, 05:36:42 AM »
I'm trying to imagine the ad Bacchus describes, and I'm failing. I guess I should see it before judging, but it sounds as though the ad is at least hinting at the old notion of sex as reward or sex as compensation.

There may be attempts to make the "reward" sound equitable, but the whole trope comes out of a history in which women, not men, were possessions or prizes or booty, and I don't see that that kind of thinking can be repackaged.

It is hard to advertise medications for any serious condition -- the choices seem to be embarrassing earnestness and piety or embarrassingly bad jokes. The question arises: why does the stuff need to be advertised? If doctors were better at talking to their patients, at anticipating problems (how hard is it to guess that men over fifty might have problems they might need to be encouraged to talk about?), the prescribing would likely be more appropriate. The pharma companies wouldn't like that, of course -- it is very much in their interest that people who don't need drugs should feel driven to buy them.

Not everyone sees a doctor regularly, of course. That's a problem too.

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #17 on: November 15, 2006, 09:51:53 AM »
Quote
where the answer is always no but Im going to/did xxxxxxxxxxx my wife and we xxxxxxxxx with all the words bleeped out and a blurred viagra pill over his mouth

Okay, I know my "final flight" is going to have a long stopover in Purgatory, but these make me laugh.  Sure, they're the most crass of the bunch, but bleeping is done so as to make it sound like the guy is swearing a blue streak, and what can I say?  I like lots of gratuitous foul language!  ;)

Quote
It is hard to advertise medications for any serious condition -- the choices seem to be embarrassing earnestness and piety or embarrassingly bad jokes.


To this day I still can't believe that that weight loss medication (that makes you bypass digesting fats and oils) had to, by law, tell you at the end of their ad that their product could cause gas, oily discharge ( :o !!), more frequent bowel movements, or an inability to control them ( :o  :shock: )

That's a marketer's worst nightmare.  Your product will practically sell itself (easy weight loss!) but on the flip side, it might make people shit their pants in the middle of a board meeting.
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Bacchus

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« Reply #18 on: November 15, 2006, 10:00:48 AM »
MadTV had a hilarius sketch about this with a ad, where the emphasis was that there was 10% less anal leakage to other leading brands
When you're on your own
When you're at a fork in the road
You don't know which way to go
There's too many signs and arrows
You haven't laughed in a while
When you can't even fake a smile
When you feel ashamed...
The uniform don't make you brave

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« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2006, 10:55:32 AM »
people still bought those "Olestra" chips.

brebis noire

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« Reply #20 on: November 15, 2006, 11:00:18 AM »
Quote from: thwap
people still bought those "Olestra" chips.


Ya - I bought them, once. After I read the warning re digestion, I didn't even eat any. (I think I picked them up in the US, were they even available in Canada? I gave them to the SO instead, no reported problems except for a taste deficit.)

vmichel

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« Reply #21 on: November 15, 2006, 02:24:32 PM »
Quote from: skdadl
It is hard to advertise medications for any serious condition -- the choices seem to be embarrassing earnestness and piety or embarrassingly bad jokes. The question arises: why does the stuff need to be advertised?


Ya, I am of two minds about this. Pharmaceutical advertisments distress me. Health is not a consumer commodity, or at least it should not be framed as such by the people who make medicine.

When the drug commercial says "talk to your doctor," it represents something of a shift in doctor-patient relations. The doctor isn't the expert anymore. The patient bears the burden of educating him/herself about his/her condition, and is supposed to arrive at the doctor's office armed with information.

The result is that the poorly educated patient gets substandard care. I am seeing doctors becoming less inclined to research difficult cases themselves. With pediatric cases, especially rare disorders, doctors often assume the parent will be the expert and educate the doctor. As this responsibility shifts, inequities in care widen. That concerns me.

On the other hand, the medical establishment has a terrible history with regards to educating patients about their rights and alternatives to treatment. I'm not comfortable trusting the doctor to tell me what to do, especially if the problems are related to sex or disability.

Imagine if there weren't ads for Viagra, and the doctor was most people's source of information about the drug. I don't want my family doctor deciding whether I need to know about Viagra or not. His opinions about sexuality will become gatekeepers for the drug: how many gay men will he talk with about Viagra? Unmarried men? Elderly men?

The viagra ads bother me a lot, but I'm also bothered to think of doctors acting as the gatekeepers of knowledge about drugs. It's a hard call, and I'm not sure what I think.

brebis noire

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« Reply #22 on: November 15, 2006, 02:32:08 PM »
Unless something has changed recently, direct-to-patient marketing is not allowed in Canada. Those explicit commercials are ones we see on USian channels.


Quote
Unlike in the United States, direct to consumer advertising is not legal in Canada. Because of this, Canadian pharmaceutical companies cannot advertise a treatment and a disease together. Canadian ads cannot link a cure to a specific problem. But what they can do is advertise a product without mentioning the medical condition it may treat, or discuss the disease without mentioning the product that can treat it - and then suggest that readers consult their physician for a solution.

Yet Canadians, on average, are unaware of this advertising glitch, said John Hinds, vice-president of public affairs for the CNA. Canucks are not only bombarded by an influx of American advertisements through American publications, but they are exposed to many well-known drug ads, such as Viagra, that don’t require them to mention what they treat. Because of this, many Canadians believe their government already allows direct-to-consumer advertising, known in the industry as DTCA.



From: http://www.cna-acj.ca/client/cna/cna.ns ... maceutical

vmichel

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« Reply #23 on: November 15, 2006, 03:13:05 PM »
Interesting, brebis noire. Yet another reason to want to move to Canada. :)

On behalf of the United States of America, I hereby apologize to all Canadians for those awful Viagra ads!  :wink:

skdadl

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« Reply #24 on: November 15, 2006, 03:14:58 PM »
Hey, you guys! We have a turncoat!  :D

Debra

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« Reply #25 on: November 15, 2006, 04:50:33 PM »
damn you people and your viagra talk  :rotfl:

I've deleted the profile so no point keeping the link up.

For future reference it was a spam profile for penis enlargement.
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skdadl

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« Reply #26 on: November 15, 2006, 04:52:54 PM »
:lol:

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« Reply #27 on: November 15, 2006, 05:20:47 PM »
sosowohwoh,

not a very effective name.

So his ability to provide "woh-woh!" is only "so-so"?

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #28 on: November 15, 2006, 06:37:20 PM »
Didja read his blog!!!   :shock:   Freud would have had a field day with him ...  :lol:

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #29 on: November 15, 2006, 06:47:06 PM »
I dunno.  As Freud himself said, sometimes a cigar is just a penis... I MEAN CIGAR!  (I'm sure I said cigar...  :oops: )
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