Author Topic: Outdoor gardens  (Read 54858 times)

Boom Boom

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Outdoor gardens
« on: June 13, 2006, 11:10:28 AM »
I hope members will feel free post a link to photos of their gardens. I won't have my own place until next month, so in the meantime here are links to the surrounding plants of the Lower North Shore where I've lived since 1995:

rocky moss: http://i5.tinypic.com/14aaivt.jpg

dwarf conifer in rock: http://i5.tinypic.com/14aamc1.jpg

dwarf conifer (not really sure of the name; these are common plants here): http://i6.tinypic.com/14aao74.jpg

maybe a stunted-growth spruce? in moss: http://i6.tinypic.com/14aaot1.jpg

nearby river, just outside the village, with lots of green cover: http://i5.tinypic.com/14aaqz4.jpg

the main road as it is quite a ways from the village, with plenty of green on both sides: http://i6.tinypic.com/14abdqs.jpg

water lillies in a local pond: http://i6.tinypic.com/14abgvo.jpg

not exactly foliage; just a piece of driftwood on a nearby shore that I thought was photogenic: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abhvo.jpg

cotton grass, very common here: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abjuq.jpg

pitcher plant (crimson) amongst other common lower north shore plants: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abksm.jpg

washed-up kelp on shoreline: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abnl0.jpg

sheep laurel (pink) and other bog plants: http://i6.tinypic.com/14abqs9.jpg

toadstools are everywhere here, and are probably extremely toxic: http://i6.tinypic.com/14abtj6.jpg

I'm not sure what these are, but they grow everywhere here: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abu6p.jpg

a variety of wild berries: http://i6.tinypic.com/14afv36.jpg

wild blueberries: http://i6.tinypic.com/14ag268.jpg

raspberries in the wild: http://i5.tinypic.com/14ag83k.jpg

bakeapple (cloudberry) and other plants: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abz2c.jpg

I'm going to try and transplant a few of these to my garden - I've seen others here do likewise, with varying degrees of success. The only plants that don't transplant well at all are from the bog, so generally we leave those alone.

Morning Glory

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Outdoor gardens
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2006, 01:40:40 PM »
Baby Boomer, that bakeapple/cloudberry plant is quite cool.  I've never seen such a flower.

Here are some pics of my garden taken yesterday?


Front yard with ground cover thyme, hosta and sandcherry shrubs.  (Small one at front of picture was eaten by an anthill last summer.)


Front yard showing goutweed (thought I got rid of it all last year), creeping rose, snowball (viburnem sp?), hostas, sedums, and other things that haven't flowered yet so I don't know what they are.



My vegetable garden!


Backyard with annuals.  Morning Glories are climbing up the willow twigs in the raised planter and the strings on the garage - can't really see them yet.


The wild part of the garden.  (Or, where little boys go to pee if they haven't already peed in the pool.)


IF THESE IMAGES ARE TOO BIG LET ME KNOW ASAP AND I'LL DELETE THEM.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2006, 02:12:37 PM »
Wow, Morning Glory, I'm green with envy! You have a great gardener's touch. BTW, the bakeapple/cloudberry is our main source of natural Vitamin C here - we make bakeapple jam, butter, tarts, pie, cake, and we even freeze bakeapples for the winter. Bakeapples are especially popular in Labrador, although where I live is called "Quebec Labrador". I have bakeapple jam on toast every morning.

ps: I was going to take a break from posting, but I have to remain at the apartment for a few days while we continue the negotiations around the insurance and mortgage for the new place. So, I'm here for a few days yet.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2006, 02:14:49 PM »
Quote from: Morning Glory

IF THESE IMAGES ARE TOO BIG LET ME KNOW ASAP AND I'LL DELETE THEM.


They're the perfect size. And 'm green with envy. Can I hire you to do some landscaping here when I get moved? (actually said in jest, I can't afford to hire anyone)

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2006, 11:16:55 AM »
Art in the Garden show, June 18-19, at Kiwi Gardens near Perth, Ontario.

I will be going tomorrow.  Will take pix and show them to my plants, so they'll know what my expectations are for them.   :lol:



From last year's show.

Boom Boom

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Re: Art in the Garden
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2006, 10:40:13 PM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
I will be going tomorrow.  Will take pix and show them to my plants, so they'll know what my expectations are for them.   :lol:


 :mrgreen:  :mrgreen:

skdadl

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Outdoor gardens
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2006, 10:38:18 AM »
:lol:

Morning Glory, you have the touch. Also, you are making me feel guilty. I am still ridiculously weedy, and we may be passing the point of no return soon, given the tropical conditions now descending on this city.

Och, I have been such a slouch.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2007, 10:23:17 AM »
The blackflies were really bad this morning while I was out watering the grass and the gardens.

I had expected the birds would be eating them all!

Perhaps the birds are too well fed from the birdseed I put out every day? :feedbirds:  At least you can hear them all singing when I approach with their feed, and replenish the two bird baths. :feedbirds:

A few frogs and toads have shown up, as well. Wish they were bigger, so I could avoid them. I want them to do their part in keeping the bug population down.

No snakes - I had expected common garter snakes to show up and keep the mice population down - I've only seen one mouse here this year - he kept falling into the hole I dug for the garden gate, and I kept having
to fish him out. About a kilometer away, a friend's garden is overrun with mice, while another, a bit further away, has a problem with ground hogs eating everything in their garden. I don't have those problems!

But - the blackflies are really, really bad this year  :(

My potato crop is doing very well, meslun lettuce appears okay, carrots are making an appearance, as are the turnips and beans. No tomatoes yet - guess this year is just too cold. The zinnias are doing very well - the sunflowers and hostas not well at all.  :(

I love listening to the birds sing for their supper! :feedbirds: :feedbirds: :feedbirds:

deBeauxOs

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Outdoor gardens
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2007, 10:36:21 AM »
Blackflies are usually dead by August; yours are thriving since the lower North Shore has not had a killer heat wave.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2007, 10:39:18 AM »
And we've had rain every week since April. My crops aren't doing well because of the cold, and maybe the saltwater air. Other gardens, further away from the shoreline, are doing better than mine. And, perhaps, they've had fertilizer and compost - I had neither.

faith

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« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2007, 11:30:47 AM »
My lettuce is all done - does anyone know if you can plant a second crop? We won't get a frost here until November at the earliest , so will lettuce withstand the hot weather of August and be ready to eat in September? Green onions which were lovely are also all finished - I have a packet of seeds so I am going to plant some where the garlic was growing and see if I can get some more before the growing season is finished.

Never buy bedding plants at Wal-Mart. I don't usually shop at Wal-Mart but I was stuck in a place doing nothing around planting time and they were open, so I bought some English Cucumber- which turned out to be plain ordinary everyday cucumber. I bought tomatoes  which were also labelled wrong.

My UFO zucchini (grown from seed0 is almost ready to start harvesting, the squash is also coming along and the peas we've been eating for a while now.
just picture it

Debra

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« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2007, 12:12:40 PM »
yes you can definitely plant a second crop. It might need more water though and watch for bolting.

I didn't shop at WalMart but my tomatoes were labelled wrongly also. I bought heritage and got roma.
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faith

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« Reply #12 on: August 06, 2007, 09:15:32 PM »
Thanks for the lettuce info- I went to Victoria Seeds website which specializes in heritage seeds and found an interesting 'winter mix' for lettuce. I think I'll order some as well as some sugar snap peas and see what happens.
just picture it

Toedancer

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« Reply #13 on: August 06, 2007, 09:39:56 PM »
With the LR window being an old-fashioned bay window, I didn't know what to plant under it on the ground. The ground is basically sand, hard, never gets rained on. So I threw one packet of wildflower seeds under it. I bought the seed packet at Zellers. Now I am dying to know what company made them.

It has exceeded any of my expectations. I LOVE The Wee Flowers, from a burnt orange to orange to that incredible Periwinkle Blue/Purple. Really nice, but I soooooooooooo miss the River.  :(
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Boom Boom

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« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2007, 12:48:00 PM »
:feedbirds: :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:  :spy: :feedbirds:  :feedbirds: :feedbirds:

Just back from pulling the weeds out of the garden, watering the grass seed and crops, and feeding the birds. The birds don't even fly away now when I come near them. I think they know I'm the one who feeds them. Lots of Mourning Doves and Goldfinches today.

 

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