Author Topic: Outdoor gardens  (Read 55911 times)

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #60 on: September 25, 2007, 08:37:43 PM »
Au contraire!  What could be more delicious than a half a teaspoon full of baby peas?   :)
ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,

Boom Boom

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« Reply #61 on: September 25, 2007, 08:41:00 PM »
Yes, of course. Except I don't grow them. :wink:

Boom Boom

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« Reply #62 on: September 29, 2007, 11:15:09 AM »
No skitters here for almost a month now - yayyy!

I have about half of my backyard fenced in to protect the wee birdies, moles, and chipmunks from roving dogs and cats, and it's become a small
wild bird sanctuary.

I'm fascinated with this. A family of Mourning Doves comes every afternoon, and in the mornings my backyard is alive with buntings, sparrows, grosbeaks, finches, and seven coal black Ravens who have a tendency to scare away everything but the chipmunks.

Any suggestions on how to make the bird sanctuary even more attractive to my winged friends?

I already have planted some shrubs and  I probably should plant a few more. Sunflowers don't do well here - there's just too much wind. I have some apple seedlings that will take probably ten years to reach a decent
height for birds to build nests in. :garden  :feedbirds:

deBeauxOs

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Outdoor gardens
« Reply #63 on: September 29, 2007, 11:20:21 AM »
Quote from: Boom Boom
... Any suggestions on how to make the bird sanctuary even more attractive to my winged friends?...
You could set up a bird bath but then you'll have to hose out the old water every day and provide fresh, to prevent it from becoming a skeeter breeding post.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #64 on: September 29, 2007, 12:26:15 PM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
You could set up a bird bath but then you'll have to hose out the old water every day and provide fresh, to prevent it from becoming a skeeter breeding post.


Yes, I've two bird baths, and I hose them out every day. Only takes a few hours for each of them to get quite soiled.

The sun is out today, and the wild things are pretty frisky. There was an eagle flying over the village today - we see about one or two of these large birds every year. I had an owl at the bird bath a few days ago.

deBeauxOs

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Outdoor gardens
« Reply #65 on: September 29, 2007, 02:09:15 PM »
Well, other than cobbling together some means of sheltering the wee critters who visit your garden from the rafales et bourrasques blowing in from the St-Laurent, you're providing all that they need - they don't watch TV and so far, don't require internet access.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #66 on: September 29, 2007, 02:27:52 PM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Well, other than cobbling together some means of sheltering the wee critters who visit your garden from the rafales et bourrasques blowing in from the St-Laurent, you're providing all that they need - they don't watch TV and so far, don't require internet access.
[/b]

 :rotfl:  :rotfl:  :rotfl:

Boom Boom

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« Reply #67 on: September 29, 2007, 04:31:24 PM »
We're expecting temps of -1C Monday night, which is close to frost, so I'm scrambling to get the last of the lettuce, tomatoes, rutabaga, carrots, and potatoes inside the house. Not frost, but very close to it. Early this year.  :garden

anne cameron

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« Reply #68 on: September 29, 2007, 04:44:44 PM »
My mouse seems pretty connected to the internet.  Doesn't eat much, though.  Just the odd kilowatt every year or so...

We are hunkering down for a big storm.  Pouring rain and the ocean is heaving furiously.  I went outside and everything is so quiet, no sign of birds, not even sound of crickets (!)... as if everything is settling in for a real roof-ripper.

Had a great feed of chard last night, with halibut.  Today I'm looking forward to beet tops with boiled baby spuds and maybe celery stuffed with cream cheese.

The great thing bout living alone is you can just eat what you get a yen for and not have to worry about "nutrition" or "diet" or ...having a meat pie, too, my friend Lance makes them and they are incredibly good!

Guess I should get busy and get it cooked before the storm hits, be a bugger to be stuck without power, yearing for beet tops...

deBeauxOs

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Outdoor gardens
« Reply #69 on: September 29, 2007, 06:20:39 PM »
Quote from: anne cameron
... The great thing bout living alone is you can just eat what you get a yen for and not have to worry about "nutrition" or "diet" or ...
setting an example for anyone!  :lol:

Not often, but sometimes if I feel like having a dessert, I will eat a small sweet, like one small portion of crème caramel mid-day - before my veggies and protein!

Boom Boom

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« Reply #70 on: September 29, 2007, 07:06:45 PM »
Beets grow really well here, but I didn't plant any this year, I'm not especially fond of them. Chard sounds interesting - I'll have to see if they'll grow here. I forgot all about the spinach - it didn't grow at all. The peppers, squash, and cucumber plants didn't produce anything. I'll use all the greens for compost.

I'll have to plan carefully for next year - only the hardy stuff that is sure to grow. Maybe more varieties of carrots, potatoes, and turnip. And maybe some beets for the neighbours.

Croghan27

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« Reply #71 on: September 29, 2007, 08:15:19 PM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Quote from: anne cameron
... The great thing bout living alone is you can just eat what you get a yen for and not have to worry about "nutrition" or "diet" or ...
setting an example for anyone!  :lol:


stories of the oil sands ....

Now John was a decend fellow and used to invite Don, the biker, over for Christmas dinner. Don lived alone, just he and his soft tail, and did pretty much as he pleased.

Dinner was set one year but John and Don were looking at something while Melony and the kids assembled at the table. Melony gave the kids a lecture about the order of eating - the desert comes last!

when Don arrived with daddy John they sat at the table and biker, loner Don said: 'My that looks good." :D  and promptly gobbled the pumpkin pie.

The kids looked all the world like this --->  :shock: , and Melony looked like this  -->  :annoyed: , and John, far and away the most mellow, looked like this -->  :rotfl:
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #72 on: September 29, 2007, 11:31:43 PM »
My tomatoes did not do very well this year, but the perennials were amazing - my clematis is still flowering , the asters are quite beautiiful at the moment and one of the rose bushes has a new bloom.

steffie

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« Reply #73 on: September 30, 2007, 09:32:16 AM »
Two nagging questions: 1) Is a bleeding heart plant related to celery?  The leaves and stalks look similar, and when I cut them back it even smells similar!  2) How do I attract only the small birds to my feeder/repel pigeons and crows? Small feed?

P.S. I looooooove autumn.  and reading garden threads.
Let the beauty of what you love be what you do - Rumi

Boom Boom

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« Reply #74 on: September 30, 2007, 10:38:14 AM »
I got big ravens here that gobble up the small feed, so that don't work. Maybe cover with chicken wire or plastic fencing that only small birds can get through.

 

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