Author Topic: Glurge I have known  (Read 31854 times)

Gigi

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Glurge I have known
« Reply #30 on: January 04, 2007, 01:22:17 AM »
It's a small world after all, it's a small world after all, it's a small world after all, it's a small, small world.

jrootham

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« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2007, 02:40:11 AM »
Let me cast my mind back past the snows of yesteryear to consider the entries in the "Ian Robb Memorial Soppy Song Contest".   A source for splurge if there ever was one.

"The Sweet Forget-Me-Not"?  No.
"Sawdust on the Floor of My Heart" by the Plywood Magnolias?  I don't think so.
"The Dying Soldier" (with baby prop)?  Not quite.

Aha, the definitive splurge song.  
Tis the song of little Mary
Standing at the bar-room door
While the shameful midnight revel
Rages wildly as before.


COME HOME FATHER
(Henry Clay Work)

Father, dear father, come home with me, now!
The clock on the steeple strikes one;
You said you were coming straight home from the shop,
As soon as your day's work was done.
Our fire has gone out, our house is all dark,
And mother's been waiting since tea,
With poor brother Benny so sick in her arms,
And no one to help her but me.
Come home, come home, come home!
Please father, dear father come home.

cho: Hear the sweet voice of the child, **
Which the night winds repeat as they roam!
Oh who could resist this most plaintive of cries,
"Please father dear father come home.

Father, dear father, come home with me, now!
The clock on the steeple strikes two;
The night has grown colder and Benny is worse,
But he has been calling for you.
Indeed his is worse, Ma says he will die
Perhaps before morning shall dawn;
And this is the message she sent me to bring,
"Come quickly! Or he will be gone."
Come home, come home, come home!
Please father, dear father come home.


Father, dear father, come home with me, now!
The clock on the steeple strikes three,
The house is so lonely, the hours are so long
For poor weeping mother and me.
Yes we are alone. Poor Benny is dead
And gone with the angels of light,
And these were the very last words that he said
"I want to kiss Papa goodnight."
Come home, come home, come home!
Please father, dear father come home.

Croghan27

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« Reply #32 on: January 04, 2007, 04:10:50 AM »
Yo Holly:

Quote
And Honey, I miss you...
and I'm being goo-ood...

You have a truly sick mind - and that is just one of the things I like about you.

I am off now with that revolving (revolting) in my mind along with: "
Quote
Daddy - Don't you walk so fast
.."

It is made only worse that Bobby Goldsboro spend several years playing near to a diety - Roy Orbson.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Debra

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« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2007, 07:41:22 AM »
oops already been posted.

nothing to see here.
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

skdadl

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« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2007, 08:19:53 AM »
Jrootham, was "Father, dear Father, come home with me now" a Temperance song? That was definitely the spirit of the temperance movement.

skdadl

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« Reply #35 on: January 04, 2007, 08:24:30 AM »
'lance quoted:

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What was it? Bobbie Gentry has never said, but isn't there a memory of Emmett Till's murder in whatever it was?


Oh, God, that is quite chilling. That never occurred to me. In the context of the song, I have always assumed that it was their dead (and secret) baby -- no? But perhaps she meant a hidden allusion as well.

I also assume that the narrator is planning her suicide at the end of the song.

lagatta

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« Reply #36 on: January 04, 2007, 08:34:22 AM »
Yeah, that song is a kind of Southern Gothic, but I wouldn't call it glurge, as it isn't sentimental. On the contrary, it is about the nasty undercurrents in life "down home": the stifling morality, the wilful ignorance, the gossip, the sexism, and of course, while it remains unsaid, the murderous racism.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

chester

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« Reply #37 on: January 04, 2007, 09:24:08 AM »
i thought billy joe jumped of of tallahasse bridge, no?

skdadl

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« Reply #38 on: January 04, 2007, 09:30:11 AM »
Tallahatchie Bridge, chester -- yes, he did, but in the song the story goes that he and the girl narrator were earlier seen throwing something off it.

lagatta

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« Reply #39 on: January 04, 2007, 09:36:27 AM »
whoever transcribed this (I looked at several versions) has it Billie Joe in the title (correct) and Billy Joe in the lyrics.

The Tallahatchie River is in Mississippi, Tallahassee, in Florida. I'm not familiar with the meaning of either in the original Amerindian language(s) or whether they derive from the same language or language family.

Ode To Billie Joe
( Bobbie Gentry )

It was the third of June, another sleepy, dusty Delta day
I was out choppin' cotton and my brother was balin' hay
And at dinner time we stopped and walked back to the house to eat
And Mama hollered out the back door "y'all remember to wipe your feet"
And then she said "I got some news this mornin' from Choctaw Ridge"
"Today Billy Joe MacAllister jumped off the Tallahatchie Bridge"

And Papa said to Mama as he passed around the blackeyed peas
"Well, Billy Joe never had a lick of sense, pass the biscuits, please"
"There's five more acres in the lower forty I've got to plow"
And Mama said it was shame about Billy Joe, anyhow
Seems like nothin' ever comes to no good up on Choctaw Ridge
And now Billy Joe MacAllister's jumped off the Tallahatchie Bridge

And Brother said he recollected when he and Tom and Billie Joe
Put a frog down my back at the Carroll County picture show
And wasn't I talkin' to him after church last Sunday night?
"I'll have another piece of apple pie, you know it don't seem right"
"I saw him at the sawmill yesterday on Choctaw Ridge"
"And now you tell me Billie Joe's jumped off the Tallahatchie Bridge"

And Mama said to me "Child, what's happened to your appetite?"
"I've been cookin' all morning and you haven't touched a single bite"
"That nice young preacher, Brother Taylor, dropped by today"
"Said he'd be pleased to have dinner on Sunday, oh, by the way"
"He said he saw a girl that looked a lot like you up on Choctaw Ridge"
"And she and Billy Joe was throwing somethin' off the Tallahatchie Bridge"

A year has come 'n' gone since we heard the news 'bout Billy Joe
And Brother married Becky Thompson, they bought a store in Tupelo
There was a virus going 'round, Papa caught it and he died last Spring
And now Mama doesn't seem to wanna do much of anything
And me, I spend a lot of time pickin' flowers up on Choctaw Ridge

And drop them into the muddy water off the Tallahatchie Bridge
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

jrootham

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« Reply #40 on: January 04, 2007, 11:41:14 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
Jrootham, was "Father, dear Father, come home with me now" a Temperance song? That was definitely the spirit of the temperance movement.


Not 100% obvious.  Clay worked in the right era, and I am sure that song was both triggered by and adopted by the movement, but how close the connection was is not clear.

Gigi

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« Reply #41 on: January 04, 2007, 01:05:28 PM »
I have this idea that there was an entire era of this stuff -

Hang down your head Tom Dooley, hang down your head and cry...


Oh where oh where can my baby be, the Lord took her away from me...


Leader of the pack...

skdadl

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« Reply #42 on: January 04, 2007, 01:15:55 PM »
Well, Tom Dooley was different -- Tom Dooley was good. That was the folkie revival.

But you're right about the sentimentality that was creeping into pop-rock songs in the late fifties, early sixties. There was a lot of melodramatic story-telling going on. "Leader of the Pack" was the classic, the really big hit, but the imitations were legion.

I think I'm a-gonna go look for some Kingston Trio on youtube.

skdadl

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« Reply #43 on: January 04, 2007, 01:16:29 PM »
PS: Can you see why we were all so grateful when the Beatles came along?

Whew!

'lance

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« Reply #44 on: January 04, 2007, 01:23:05 PM »
Quote from: Gigi
I have this idea that there was an entire era of this stuff -

Hang down your head Tom Dooley, hang down your head and cry...

Oh where oh where can my baby be, the Lord took her away from me...


Well, but waittaminute, though. "Tom Dooley" is a fairly old song, much predating the Kingston Trio cov er from 1960 or thereabouts. And remember, it's a "murder ballad," which is an old traditional form -- maybe sentimental, but not at all "uplifting" like glurge.

There was (maybe still is) a Toronto band, the Skydiggers, who used to cover that song. But their version was radically different to the harmonious Kingston Trio-style version we sang in school in the 70s. Theirs was in a minor key, very menacing, so that you didn't recognize it until they started into the lyrics. The first time I heard it, I found it shocking because it hit me as it hadn't earlier -- Tom Dooley is, after all, a confessed murderer.

The whole "teen angel" genre I find interesting in another way. Nobody, so far as I know, talked much about "teenagers" in North American culture before the 1950s, and of course people of that age almost never owned cars before then. Combine that with the fact that cars of that era were, more or less, death-traps, and the rise of pop/rock songs aimed at young people, and behold -- a whole new kind of song, or at least a new variation on an old theme (young people dying young).

 

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