Author Topic: "... all their lives -- radio listeners!"  (Read 9513 times)

sparqui

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2007, 11:37:01 PM »
I sure miss Peter Gzowski and Morningside. It was while I was in university that my roommate and friend introduced me to CBC 1 and all those fantastic programs (early 80s). And Vicky Gabreau was also a treat.

True that radio culture has practically disappeared in terms of guides, reviews and public discourse. But I think people still love radio. My favourite is listening to CBC Overnight and hearing programs from other public broadcasters like Radio Netherlands, Channel Africa or Deutch Wella (sp?).

I remember driving from Ontario to Nova Scotia just before Christmas and CBC radio playing against the various snowscapes was just fabulously Canadian. Especially Bill Richardson's Round Up -- hearing voices from all across the country calling in to Sad Goat while traversing the eastern provinces.
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

Boom Boom

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2007, 12:01:44 AM »
When I worked in northern Ontario, I always started my day with Peter Gzowski on Morningside, although sometimes Don Harron subbed.

Re: transistor radios - I used to have a small one when I was a kid, and wore it under my shirt to class sometimes, to listen to the baseball games and other stuff, by using the earpiece that cut off the speaker, so I could hear, but not anyone else.

Croghan27

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2007, 12:15:13 AM »
Quote
Some kinda magical multiplex got you WOWO late at night
.

and after the interference from the sun was gone we could get WKBWWWWW and Murry the K and all the Boston/New York stations - I once walked all over NY just to get to Grammarcy Park, where most of the advertizers seemed to come from .... (it's just a big building - not a magic palace)   :?

And if you were reeeeeal lucky you'd pick up WWVA, In Wheelin' West Virginia - 500,000 watts of country power ...

 :party4
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

skdadl

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2007, 06:01:34 AM »
We didn't have a TV until I was eleven and we moved to the Big City (Calgary), so radio was so important in our lives when we were little.

Mum would have the radio on when she was doing housework, so some of my earliest memories are of daytime soaps, actually -- I can still hear the announcer saying, "And now -- 'Laura Limited.' "  And there were cheery breakfast shows, like the great Canadian group The Happy Gang (I can still sing their theme song), and some American program where we did a march around the breakfast table every day.

You would still hear the pop songs from the war years -- I remember the Andrews Sisters, eg, and the young Sinatra, and Bing Crosby, Rosemary Clooney -- radio was where we learned all that stuff, even though it was already becoming dated.

Art Linkletter, "Kids Say the Darndest Things." Jack Benny, Bob Hope, Liberace, and the greatest of all, Wayne and Shuster! Man, they were good on radio.

The most fun for me was the evening mysteries, though -- "Boston Blackie" and "Strange." Loved those shows, got to stay up to hear them.

We used to sit around the radio (large wooden set with carving around where the speakers were set in) and watch it, actually watch it, just the way people watched TV later.

G'night, skdadl. G'night, John-boy.

skdadl

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« Reply #19 on: January 08, 2007, 06:04:43 AM »
PS: I forgot Maggie Muggins -- great Canadian children's show. Maggie was played by Deanne Taylor, now of the Hummer Sisters, and years later a year behind me in high school in Calgary.

Tra la la la la la larrity
Today I dug potatoes with Mr McGarrity
I wonder what will happen tomorrow.

Croghan27

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« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2007, 08:39:12 AM »
skadadl reminisces:
   
Quote
I remember the Andrews Sisters, eg, and the young Sinatra, and Bing Crosby, Rosemary Clooney


I saw Syriana yesterday - given they are both in the same business I wondered if George Clooney was Rosemary's Baby.

Turns out he is Rosenary's Nephew. Dosn't have quite the same reverberations.

She recorded one of my favourite tunes of all time:  You'll Never Know - used so subtly and was such melencholy effect in "Alice Dosn't Live Here, Anymore."
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

k'in

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #21 on: January 08, 2007, 01:20:04 PM »
Can’t remember a time when a radio wasn’t close by.  Remember most listening to baseball & hockey broadcasts from all over N. America when conditions permitted.

First heard music via the legendary CKLW Windsor.  Motown, folk, schlock, C&W, metal, punk, funk, all kinds of rock, urban – they played it all. Got taken to task by the parents on too many occasions to count for the long distance calls to request my favourite song.  Think I figured out how to actually use a phone calling CKLW. Many legendary Canadian & US artists broke on CKLW due to the instincts and support of program director Rosalie Tremblay.  Imagine, there was a time when women were giving the thumbs up/down on the aspiring careers of Bob Seger or Ted Nugent, not explaining the concept of the word “rights” to the likes of Elizabeth May.

TV.  Had a long, tall tower next to the house and a device inside that pointed the aerial in the desired direction.  Weather permitting, pulled in all kinds of neat stuff from parts previously unknown, thankfully devoid of CRTC censorship.  Downside was the array of dubious parallel 3 television evangelists that provided many laughs for brother & I.  

Sadly today consultants, focus groups and Clear Channel determine commercial radio playlists and formats. Not so much magic today or opportunity to discover the new and exciting.  Thank goddess for the internet.

Holly Stick

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #22 on: January 08, 2007, 03:58:26 PM »
Quote from: Croghan27
...He also had a competition/referendum for a National Anthem for Canada. "Oh Canada" won ... but Stan Roger's NorthWest Passage came in a strong second.

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To seek a Northwest Passage at the call of many men,
And find but the road back home again."
The first time I heard that song was at Canmore folk fest, the only time I ever saw Stan Rogers in person.  It was magnificent; and all the songs he sang that night were new to me.  But another one, Watch the Field Behind the Plough, touched closest to home.

I learned so much about music and books and Canada from listening to Gzowski.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Boom Boom

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #23 on: January 08, 2007, 06:57:31 PM »
I have I think two old record albums by Stan Rogers. Can't play them until I find a dealer that sells belts for belt-driven turntables.  :(

Debra

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2007, 09:16:26 PM »
Try this site Boom Boom

ETA there are also a number of belts on ebay.
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Boom Boom

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #25 on: January 08, 2007, 09:21:01 PM »
Quote from: Debra
Try this site Boom Boom

ETA there are also a number of belts on ebay.


Wow - thanks! I'll give it a try. I've never been on eBay, though.

edited to add: Nuts - they don't carry Samsung. The owner will try to find one for me elsewhere.

radiorahim

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"... all their lives -- radio listeners!"
« Reply #26 on: January 08, 2007, 09:27:25 PM »
I'm a child of the 60's with older siblings and there was a "radio war" with the kitchen radio.

We had Top-40 AM radio on from 1050 CHUM...but when the parents came home...a quick crank of the dial and over to 1010 CFRB which back then played a mix of talk, moldy-oldy standards and classical music.   When the parents left the room....crank...back on 1050 CHUM.

Anyway...the kitchen radio was always on!

FM radio was around but it didn't become a "big thing" till maybe the early 1970's and I began to switch to CHUM-FM when I was in high school.   Used to listen to "Pete & Geets" (Peter Griffin and Geets Romo) and "Warren Down...the traffic reporter from the mobile telephone booth" in the mornings.

It was the early years of morning "zaniness" on radio.    It was funny then...it's just boring now.

Quote
Tiny transistor radios were the ipods of my generation. I remember listening to far-off US stations late at night under the bedcovers - because that was when the reception was good - to catch the pop tunes of that era.

You were "DXing" (but didn't know it ;) ).    The term "DX" comes from an old radiotelegraphy shorthand for "distance".    "DXing" is a sort of "radio hobby" where folks tune up and down the dials listening for distant stations.   The folks who do this sort of thing are called "DX'ers".

Basically what happens is that AM radio stations "skip" off what's called the "D layer" of the ionosphere at night.    During daylight, those signals are absorbed by the ionosphere so they don't "skip".

There is a sort of "plan" as to what kinds of stations are on different channels.   There's actually a treaty between Canada and the U.S (and maybe Mexico?) that dates back to the 1930's that governs this.

Certain AM channels are "clear" channels...with just a few big 50,000 watt stations on them.    That allows these stations to blast across the continent at night.     Other channels are "regional" with stations in the 5-10,000 watt range.     Then there are the "local" channels wherre stations can only run only 1,000 watts during the day and must drop to 250 watts at night.

Some stations in the U.S. actually have to sign-off at night.   Many others have to change their signal pattern at night to "protect" other stations using the same channel.

Here's a site that explains a bit about it "dxing" ;)

http://www.odxa.on.ca/beginnersguide/dxguide.html

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Has anyone else noticed that radio coverage of hockey games is actually better than the audio commentary on TV?

My father used to regularly turn off the volume on the TV (Bill Hewitt did the play-by-play for the Toronto Maple Leafs on TV in the 1960's and 70's).    His father, legendary hockey broadcaster Foster Hewitt did the play-by-play on 1430 CKFH in Toronto and so he'd turn the radio on!

I think being a sportscaster on radio you have to be a whole lot more descriptive of what's happening.

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Nowadays I usually have the radio on when I am using my computer.

I'm usually running audio streams...for instance as I type this I'm streaming the NPR station out of Miami.

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I built a Heathkit oscilloscope as well as two Heathkit radios.


I have one piece of Heathkit equipment still...but can't say that I built it...someone else did...I just bought it ;)

Heathkit was started by a couple of folks who bought all kinds of surplus electronic parts from the U.S. government after the Second World War.  There were warehouses full of the stuff.   They designed really good electronic "kits" that were thoroughly documented...complete with check lists etc.    Sadly the economics of "buying" vs. "building" caught up with them and I understand they folded up shop 15-20 years ago.

I used to twiddle dials and then as a media junkie got heavily into listening to shortwave radio...and then got interested in the "science" of radio and studied and got my amateur (ham) radio license.    It still is a very special "thrill" for a radio signal with about as much power as one would find in a typical household light bulb to land on the other side of the planet.

Anyway...I'm just as bad at accumulating radio "junque" as I am at accumulating computer "junque".

Shortwave radio broadcasting has declined rapidly since a) the end of the "cold war" and b) the development of streaming audio on the internet.

Most of the major shortwave radio stations are no longer "directing" signals at North America and other "developed" countries.   They are still directing signals to the third world where many people have never used a telephone let alone an internet connection.    In the third world, radio is still the cheapest way to get information out.

However, just because the shortwave stations are no longer beaming their signals to North America, doesn't mean that we can't hear the stations...because we can usually hear shortwave broadcasts that are directed to other parts of the world.

For instance, Radio Australia has a transmission directed at the South Pacific islands on 9.580 MHz. (9580 KHz...take your pick!) ...but the signal just keeps on going, and we hear it in southern Ontario early in the morning with any relatively half-decent shortwave radio.

The one shortwave station which still very much does target North America is Radio Havana Cuba.   You can hear them blasting in just about every night of the week in southern Ontario.
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sparqui

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« Reply #27 on: January 09, 2007, 12:04:51 AM »
You reminded me of the fact that we got to listen to CHOME (sp? sounds like shome) FM out of Montreal in my art class all through highschool. How they picked it up when we couldn't on our radios at home is a mystery to me.
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

 

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