Author Topic: Year's end foodie thread  (Read 7964 times)

arborman

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Year's end foodie thread
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2006, 07:33:30 PM »
We're having Moroccan spiced chicken tonight with some relatives.  Harissa makes me happy.   :wink:  Stuffed with dried fruit & toasted cumin & stuff.  Very yummy.

In fact, I suspect it is in the oven as I type this.  This also makes me happy.  That's it, I'm going home.

I'll post the recipe later tonight, or tomorrow or somesuch.
The pleasures of the table are for every man, of every land, and no matter what place in history or society; they can be a part of all his other pleasures, and they last the longest, to console him when he has outlived the rest.

lagatta

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« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2006, 07:51:17 PM »
I love Maghrebian food. We are blessed with a large Maghrebian community here, from Tunisia, Algerian and Morocco, both Muslims and Sephardic Jews.

That sounds lovely. I may have made the same recipe, but there are so many variations...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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Year's end foodie thread
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2006, 08:22:30 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
Tapas, little Asian fish and seafood dishes and many others could be part of such a feast.  I usually make a much simpler and smaller version of this menu during les Fêtes: Christmas Fish (link)
Yum!  What a great feast.  I haven't made Putanesca sauce in a while, and I love it.  A good January meal too, I think.


lagatta

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« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2006, 09:08:59 PM »
Here is another for such a meal. This makes a lot; you can cut it in half if serving as a tapa. A credible version can be made with frozen fish and shrimp, or seafood medley, bought when on sale:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recip ... ews/100966

BRAZILIAN SEAFOOD STEW

This recipe can be prepared in 45 minutes or less.
The coconut milk can be found in the Asian foods section of most supermarkets.

4 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 1/2 pounds white fish fillets (such as red snapper or orange roughy), cut into 1-inch pieces

1 1/2 cups chopped onion
1 1/2 cups chopped green bell peppers
2 garlic cloves, chopped
3/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
2 cups chopped tomatoes
3/4 cup canned unsweetened coconut milk
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/2 cup chopped green onions
1 1/4 pounds uncooked medium shrimp, peeled, deveined

Whisk 2 tablespoons oil and lime juice in large bowl. Add fish and sprinkle generously with salt and pepper; stir to coat. Let stand 15 minutes.

Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil in large pot over medium heat. Add onion, bell peppers, garlic and crushed red pepper; sauté 5 minutes. Mix in tomatoes, coconut milk, half of cilantro and half of green onions. Add shrimp and fish with marinade. Simmer until shrimp and fish are just opaque in center, about 5 minutes. Season stew with salt and pepper. Transfer to bowl. Sprinkle with remaining cilantro and green onions.

Serves 6 to 8.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Debra

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Year's end foodie thread
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2006, 12:02:38 PM »
Silver Palate Gingerbread

Made this this morning. We all all had a tiny wee bit to taste. survey says YUM!  :eat
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

lagatta

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« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2006, 12:18:06 PM »
I've made the sofrito for the paella, cut up and browned the cornish hen. Wanted to do those things in advance as they make a mess.

I'm having supper with friends downstairs at the co-op tonight, (an organic roast chicken) and assembling the paella tomorrow.

We are blessed with lots of non-Christians hereabouts if we need anything at the last minute. Obviously the stuff I had to get from the Italians, Portuguese (the cornish hen) and Argentines (some great goat cheese - from Italy actually but cheaper at that shop) was done yesterday, but I can pick up odds and ends from the Maghrebians and the East and Southeast Asians within a short walk.

I think I can even get dépanneur wine (yecch) if we run short tomorrow. My corner dépanneur is Chinese.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

aRoused

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« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2006, 02:32:12 PM »
This is a complete tangent to the wonderful Maghrebian and generally turkey-free things that have gone before, but I offer this to you, and I'll probably be told 'we knew about that one', but it was news to me, dammit!
I make good gravy. My fiancees family does not make gravy. They use (gasp) granules. (Bless!) I offered to make proper gravy from the turkey drippings tomorrow. It turns out I don't even need to.

Take a good stuffing recipe that makes a fairly dry stuffing. Something like half a pound of breadcrumbs, a lotta chopped up apricots and celery, season to taste, and mix in two beaten eggs *then make it into balls*. Put the balls around the turkey while it roasts, and they'll soak up all the wonderful drippings. No basis for making gravy from them, but I can't wait to snaffle half of them onto my plate tomorrow!

Eat hearty!
Give me a fast ship, for I intend to go in harm\'s way.

lagatta

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« Reply #22 on: December 26, 2006, 11:08:54 AM »
La Tourtière. Not for the Mme Benoit-inspired recipe (dull and heavy, like most of Madame's food) but for the story of life in Trois-Rivières way back when. It even mentions the original Boom Boom!

I much prefer a caribou or venison-based tourtière, and do lively up the spicing a bit. Still, I only make it when there are several guests, as it remains a heavy dish, more suited for farmers and loggers than urban computer slaves.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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Year's end foodie thread
« Reply #23 on: December 26, 2006, 01:12:16 PM »
Simply marvellous, lagatta.

Charming essay, and I could make that.  :D

Years ago, a caterer here called Daniel et Daniel made a tourtière that I loved with a touch of tomato to it. The s-i-l had heard me speak of it longingly so brought me one a few months ago, first time I'd had a D et D tourtière for years. But it just wasn't the same. I think they've decided to return to the basics, which might be good from one pov but to me meant a rather bland pie -- ok, but not worth the trips I used to take for them.

lagatta

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« Reply #24 on: December 26, 2006, 01:38:26 PM »
Première moisson: http://www.premieremoisson.com/ a chain of bakeries here, do a nice venison tourtière, though fairly traditional seasoning. I usually make my own, so I'm not as familiar as I should be with other, smaller artisanal tourtière bakers in Montréal.

If you are in the Ottawa/Gatineau area, you can pick up lovely tourtières at Restaurant Les Fougères, in Chelsea, Québec: http://www.fougeres.com/docs/storemenu.pdf

Trois-Rivières is one of our oldest cities and there are still some heritage buildings, but alas much of the old city centre was demolished or sadly neglected when it was mostly a paper mill town.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

 

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