Author Topic: antidotes to winter  (Read 5965 times)

lagatta

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antidotes to winter
« on: January 16, 2007, 08:54:37 AM »
epicurious, the site of Gourmet and Bon Appétit magazines, is showcasing Indonesian foods, recipes and food customs on its global cuisine feature: http://www.epicurious.com/features/goin ... sian/intro

Not that I've ever been to Indonesia, but Indonesian and Indonesian-inspired foods are a saving grace when in the Netherlands, as an antidote to Dutch stodge.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

lagatta

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antidotes to winter
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2007, 07:45:34 PM »
I didn't make anything fiery, or complex, but at a store near where I was catsitting, they  had lovely grain-fed chickens for $1,39 lb (about $3 kilo). Not very big.  I roasted one, with freshish lime - from a local East Asian shop- a bag of limes that had brown spots for $1), and a couple of extra legs. At a leg, with stir-fried vegetables, and was very happy. Will eat bits of the chicken all week, as seasoning for more vegetables...

Clients are slow to pay, and I'm still rather broke, but thankful to be able to eat some nutritious food, because I've been taught to cook... See so many people buying "bowls" of frozen stuff - in plastic serving tubs... the same kind of stuff we'd make up from leftovers... and more expensive than my chicken!
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Debra

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antidotes to winter
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2007, 07:48:08 PM »
YUM.

I haven't bought limes for ages. I love lime. Did you stuff the lime inside or cook it on top?
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

lagatta

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antidotes to winter
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2007, 07:56:48 PM »
I just squeezed them like a lemon. Remember, these were dirt cheap - you need a Chinese shop or public market for that; they package up the less presentable ones and sell them off cheap.

When I do find affordable fresh limes or lemons, though, I use them a lot, as I'd rather use them than vinegar on salads for the vitamin C and because they are kinder to the tummy.

Had I been thinking, and making a fancier dish for friends, I would have stuffed some limes (or lemons) cut up in the chicken's cavity. Moreover, I feel less guilty about the energy expense, because it is heating up the kitchen a bit. I leave everything at 15c - and I'm cold!

I know that it is silly to roast a chicken for one person (I roasted a couple of extra legs) but I'd much rather have cold chicken for sandwiches and salads than cold cuts, which are alas full of nitrates etc.

Fresh veg seems to have become much more expensive in the last week, market or not. Anyone else notice that?
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Debra

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antidotes to winter
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2007, 08:01:38 PM »
I don't think it's silly to roast a chicken for one.

Then you have lots of leftovers for other yummy meals.
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Boom Boom

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antidotes to winter
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2007, 08:57:52 PM »
I roasted a turkey for one at Christmas - as I love leftover turkey for sandwiches (with cranberries) and turkey soup.

ETA: oy, vey - I ate an entire turkey, myself, in less than two weeks.  :shock:

lagatta

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« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2007, 09:02:19 PM »
It was stilll good after two weeks?  :shock:
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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antidotes to winter
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2007, 09:09:52 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
It was stilll good after two weeks?  :shock:
 It was still edible, it would seem.   :wink:


Boom Boom

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« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2007, 09:35:32 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
It was stilll good after two weeks?  :shock:


I froze half of it, ate one half the first week, the second the second week.  :)

Boom Boom

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« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2007, 09:36:43 PM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs


Edited to be politically correct:  I don't know where you're getting these smilies from, but they're terrific!  :)

Croghan27

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antidotes to winter
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2007, 09:44:24 PM »
yes Boom Boom

 ... I am looking at that and eating with it,, but I am eating my heart out!
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Boom Boom

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« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2007, 09:23:27 AM »
BTW, current Temps (Weds morning, 1030 am) are  -15F/-26C and -40F/C windchill.  At minus 40, F and C converge.

I can feel the cold in the house, against the walls and on the floor.

Otherwise, okay. :cold:

skdadl

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antidotes to winter
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2007, 09:29:48 AM »
Limes have that wonderful perfume, just a wee advantage over the lemons, lovely as lemons are.

Comment dit-on "lime" en français? Is it true that they are just called green lemons?

lagatta

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« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2007, 09:47:20 AM »
They are called citrons verts, but also just "limes" (pronounced in French, of course): http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lime_%28fruit%29

http://www.saveursdumonde.net/ency_4/citron/lime.htm

Cripes, is it cold. I've been faithfully feeding that other cat...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Sleeping Sun

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antidotes to winter
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2007, 10:17:08 AM »
Quote from: lagatta
Cripes, is it cold. I've been faithfully feeding that other cat...


Do he and Renzo get along?  Maybe next time out, you could just cat-nab him and bring him to your place.  Save yourself a bit of exposure over the next few days.

I have discovered a wonderful thing at the butcher shop.  Whole grain-fed chickens, cut into 8 pieces (minus the gibblets).  I save the wings, but I found the most wonderful recipie for the rest.  You put them in a shallow roasting pan, top with a mix of melted butter, dijon, and tarragon.  And then throw three red peppers, coarsly chopped, in around them.  Roast for about 1.5 hours, until cooked well through and golden on top.  Then (ohhh, this is the best part, I'm drooling already), take the red peppers and chicken juices, and add some white wine and a bit of chicken broth (to thin it) and salt and pepper, and saute the peppers up a bit in the roasting pan (remove the chicken first).  Then, take the peppers and sauce and blend in food processor, and serve over the chicken.  

 :drool The smell of the chicken and red peppers roasting is just heavenly.  And then, I pulled all the leftover meat off the bones and put it in a container with the leftover sauce, and let it mairnade in the fridge.  It's even better the next day.

 

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