Author Topic: 2008 Presidential Race  (Read 184962 times)

kuri

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2008 Presidential Race
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2007, 02:15:01 PM »
I like Edwards. (I'll probably work on my mom, also a registered Democrat, so support him. :) ) Obama is easily an improvement upon Clinton (well, who isn't? The more I learn about his woman, the more I dislike her) and when I read Obama's autobiography, he seemed like a really interesting and nice guy. But, like, he doesn't seem to be actually saying anything, quite often. And I'm pretty wary of the "all things to all people" act, whoever's doing it.

Edwards seems to have the courage to state his beliefs, even to hostile crowds. And so far he seems like the most progressive candidate.

I was kvetching on my LJ about having to support the "white guy" awhile back and my friend from LA had about as good advice as any on that score:

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I wouldn't feel disappointed that I was supporting the white guy, if he was truly the most progressive candidate. Besides, it's good that the white guy is the most progressive, because honestly? The white guy's a lot more likely to win, sry2say.


Which sort leads me to the idea that only the white guy has the privilege to truly be progressive, and Clinton is almost forced to take on anti-choice and pro-war positions as a sop to the people who think that she's satan just for running and being a woman. So, I dunno. But so far, it looks to me like an Edwards win would be better for ordinary USians than an Obama win (narrowly) or a Clinton win (by a country mile).

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2007, 02:32:07 PM »
From what I've heard on Radio-Canada, it appears that Hillary Clinton has been receiving coaching on how to project her warm, intimate side.  It all seems so contrived.  She's a slightly less right-wing but just as driven US Maggie Thatcher.  She wants the presidency.  Nothing wrong with that, she has a right to her dreams.  But I prefer what I've seen of John Edwards.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2007, 02:39:47 PM »
Oh, I much prefer John Edwards to Hillary. I used to like Hillary, but she's changed: she voted to give Bush a blank check in Iraq. And, her position that Israel can do no wrong - a complete turnaround from her advocacy for a mideast peace based on a two-state solution while Bill was in the White House.

GDKitty

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« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2007, 03:00:25 PM »
Yes, Edwards has been making some very good noises, indeed: extensive efforts in anti-poverty, active in labour-movement (e.g. hotel workers, SEIU) and his speech at the Riverside Church in Harlem was fab.
Obama is a force but, like Kuri, I haven't really heard him take strong stands on anything. Yet. We shall see, I guess.
I did find it sad that Obama had to consider his family's security, before making his decision. It's too dangerous for a person-of-colour to campaign in "some parts" of Merica, so he's hired extra security. If he gets the party nom, he will get secret service detail, but not for the primaries etc.
Viz Hillary: *sigh* it is a shame. I really looked up to her in 1992. Maybe that was silly (I was eighteen) but I couldn't help it; she was so refreshing.
The Iraq stuff, the corporatist stuff, the 'tragedy' of abortions stuff...it's all crap, and she must know that. I confess, however, that part of me feels defensive for her when she gets slurred/attacked by right-wingers (or even the MSM). Mother Jones magazine (Jack Hitt) dealt with this problem: "Harpy, Hero, Heretic: Hillary"
I have some problems with the MoJo piece but I think it's still a worthwhile read.
*sigh* X 2
Maybe Hillary would be a different Hillary if she lived up here?
Oh...right.
We already have one of those. Nevermind.

faith

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« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2007, 12:48:31 PM »
I like Hillary still- although I must admit to disappointment over some of her statements and changes to her political positions.

I do feel that the reality for Hillary in USian politics forces her to watch her back and temper her positions just to stay in the game, and in the US it is a game of huge proportions. If nothing else a woman with that much backbone is to be admired. Maggie Thatcher = Hillary?- I think that's a bit of a stretch. I doubt Maggie would have drawn up a plan for universal healthcare, more likely a plan to destroy public healthcare.

Barak Obama, whom I like, is also very carefully choosing his words and you can bet that every candidate is being coached for media appearances. In American politics if you can't come across well on the telly you are doomed.

Edwards would probably be Prime Minister in Canada but can he win in the US?
just picture it

deBeauxOs

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2008 Presidential Race
« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2007, 12:56:05 PM »
Quote from: faith
I like Hillary still- although I must admit to disappointment over some of her statements and changes to her political positions. If nothing else a woman with that much backbone is to be admired. Maggie Thatcher = Hillary?- I think that's a bit of a stretch. I doubt Maggie would have drawn up a plan for universal healthcare, more likely a plan to destroy public healthcare.
 That was a harsh statement that I made about her, probably because I too am disappointed that the woman who wrote 'It Takes A Village' and championed universal health care is now sacrificing what distinguished her from other politicians, to her goal of becoming US president.

Toedancer

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« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2007, 01:06:08 PM »
She also pushed for the war, that makes her a failure in my books. OTO I'm glad she and Obama are in the race, considering every President, all 43 of them, have been white males. Which sends a message. But at least they don't confuse State and Religion and that is a huge leap forward for Merkins. But until someone can run and be Atheist or at least Agnostic, they are still in the dark ages.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Croghan27

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« Reply #22 on: January 21, 2007, 01:31:18 PM »
Observations on Politics and Football:

There are many who claim that this afternoon's game between the New England Patriots (may their bankroll forever be full) and the Indianapolis Colts is the real Superbowl. The "other" league is so woeful that no team in it would have a chance to make it even this far in the league the Pats and Colts play.

So it seems is the process for the Democratic Party to chose it's candidate. They are not chosing a candidate, they are chosing the next President. George Bush has so soiled the Republican nest that any and all from the party are tainted. The only Republican option is to continue Bush's policies - The Democrats, now united against (if not for something) Bush economics/'what passed for diplomacy/ and even lately (that general garbage can) Homeland Security.

Then again - I recall Joe Nameth running off a field with one hand in the air. The NY Jets had defeated the Colts (no less) after being a 17 point underdogs. That was ten years after some guy from Missouri ended up as a shocker in the White House.

At that level, the difference between #1 and any lesser players is so thin, that any slip, any mistake or surpirse can turn the outcome in a second.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

pogge

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« Reply #23 on: January 21, 2007, 01:49:37 PM »
Keep an eye on Wesley Clark. I'm just sayin'.

fern hill

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2008 Presidential Race
« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2007, 02:38:35 PM »
How about Al Sharpton? Fabulous speaker.

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Al Sharpton May Run For President Again In 2008

By The Asssociated Press

NEW YORK (AP) - Civil rights activist Al Sharpton said Monday he is seriously considering a run for president. "I don't hear any reason not to," Sharpton, 52, said in an interview during an urban affairs conference sponsored by another civil rights leader, the Rev. Jesse Jackson.

"If we're talking about the urban agenda, can you tell me anybody else in the field who's representing that right now?" Sharpton asked. "We clearly have a reason to run, and whether we do it or not we'll see over the next couple of months."

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Despite widespread interest in the likely candidacy of another influential black Democrat, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, Sharpton said he's heard little substantive discussion of issues that might influence his decision about running.

"Right now we're hearing a lot of media razzle dazzle," Sharpton said. "I'm not hearing a lot of meat, or a lot of content. I think when the meat hits the fire, we'll find out if it's just fat or if there's some real meat there."

Sharpton said the candidate who impressed him most so far was former North Carolina Sen. John Edwards, who has made poverty the central issue of his campaign.


Black News

deBeauxOs

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2008 Presidential Race
« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2007, 04:00:32 PM »
Remember when Jesse Jackson was considered the best candidate for president?  I wonder what happened to him, that he lost hope.  Or perhaps he chose to apply his energy and vision to the community level?

kuri

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« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2007, 12:51:13 AM »
I might have to withdraw my earlier enthusiasm for Edwards:

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As to the American people, this is a difficult question. The vast majority of people are concerned about what is going on in Iraq. This will make the American people reticent toward going for Iran. But I think the American people are smart if they are told the truth, and if they trust their president. So Americans can be educated to come along with what needs to be done with Iran.


Liberal Catnip

The US: crushing our fleeting glimmers of hope since 1776. :(

GDKitty

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« Reply #27 on: January 24, 2007, 01:08:06 AM »
Jeebus!   :shock:
Johnny boy's not off to a good start.

Left Turn

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« Reply #28 on: January 24, 2007, 03:21:34 AM »
Quote from: fern hill
I'm a registered Democrat. Last time I voted for Edwards. I'll make my vote a collective BnR vote(if I agree, ooh, getting infected by Imperialosimus). I won't vote Hillary. Dunno why, but she gets up my nose.

Who do you like?


So far, the only Democratic nominee I would vote for is Dennis Kucinich.
US OUT of Iraq
Canada OUT of Afghanistan
Israel OUT of Palestine

Boom Boom

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« Reply #29 on: January 24, 2007, 10:20:49 AM »
Kucinich probably doesn't stand a snowball's chance in hell of ever winning the nomination.

 

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