Author Topic: brussels sprout leaves  (Read 3799 times)

shaolin

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brussels sprout leaves
« on: January 20, 2007, 12:07:27 PM »
Can you eat them??  I've been looking online, and so far, no answer.

I got them in my veg box, still on the stalk.  So, there are loads of green leaves at the top that I'd hate to get rid of if they're edible.  Wikipedia tells me it is a cultivar group of wild cabbage, so maybe I can eat them??

skdadl

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brussels sprout leaves
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2007, 12:21:34 PM »
I think so -- I've never had the full stalks for cooking myself, although I've seen them growing. I think the loose leaves are just the ones that were working up to produce a fully formed sprout -- but I'm sure they're nutritious -- maybe a little tougher?

I'm sure they can't hurt you, so the experiment would be interesting.

When I've let other plants -- basil, especially -- bolt (grow for too long without harvesting), that's what has happened. The leaves appear more and more spaced along the stems, instead of clustered. They're still good, though.

kuri

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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2007, 12:27:44 PM »
I would eat them. I've been doing this with broccoli leaves and even the stalks (if cut up *really* finely) and it's pretty good. Makes a good alternative coleslaw and is broccoli that Leopold actually likes.

Excuse the drift, but I'm wondering, skdadl since you mention growing basil, how long does it take to get big? I have some basil growing in a small pot, along with parsley, cilantro, sage, etc. and everything has grown up quite nicely except the basil. The basil isn't dying, however, it just sprouted got about a centimetre tall only and then stopped while all the other herbs I started at the same time are about 20 to 30 centrimetres high.  :?

shaolin

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brussels sprout leaves
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2007, 12:31:39 PM »
I'm actually talking about the leaves at the tops of the stalks.  The look quite similar to the leaves on savoy cabbage.  Big and leafy.  And in the center it looks like one big sprout.

skdadl

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brussels sprout leaves
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2007, 12:31:50 PM »
Well, the thing is, basil really needs summer -- it needs to be outside, in the sun and humid air, and very well watered. In those conditions, it grows very fast -- so fast that you have to keep harvesting it or it will bolt.

But it has a hard time indoors -- I think the dryness is the worst problem. Over the winter, the best thing you can do is just keep it alive, and the best way to keep it alive is to mist it continually. It wants that water, on the leaves, not just the roots.

As soon as you can, get it outdoors. It really isn't a houseplant.

skdadl

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brussels sprout leaves
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2007, 12:35:16 PM »
Quote from: shaolin
I'm actually talking about the leaves at the tops of the stalks.  The look quite similar to the leaves on savoy cabbage.  Big and leafy.  And in the center it looks like one big sprout.


Aha. Well, those would just be the coarser outer leaves of the sprout, I think. Just as cabbages have coarser outer leaves that people often discard, so will the wee sprouts.

You probably want to cook them separately if you decide to try. They might be better sliced/chopped and cooked longer -- good for soups?

One of the cousins serves sprouts all chopped up anyway, and I thought that was a delish way to do them. I'll go to find her method -- I can never remember whether she chops the raw sprouts or blanches them first -- the cooking time is very brief.

deBeauxOs

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brussels sprout leaves
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2007, 01:29:37 PM »
Brussel sprouts .... yum.  I remove their spotted outer leaves, make an X incision at the tough bottom stem or cut in half, steam them in a skillet, adding water when necessary until they are tender.  Then I'll add pressed garlic & grated ginger to taste (lots for me), a splash of balsamic vinegar, a bit of chili sesame oil, sauté for 30-60 seconds and serve.  Delish.

kuri

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brussels sprout leaves
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2007, 02:16:21 PM »
Thanks, skdadl. You are a fountain of wisdom. :)

skdadl

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brussels sprout leaves
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2007, 02:29:44 PM »
Och, kuri: the herbs I have killed, one way or another, indoors or out -- I do not have enough fingers and toes.   :wink:

Y'know what I just dream of having? For the winter, inside? One of those greenhouse windows in the kitchen -- they jut out and they will usually have at least a couple of shelves -- they're part of your kitchen, and yet because the glass is out there picking up the winter sun, they get very warm, just like a greenhouse, and they catch moisture too.

A friend has one in a south-facing kitchen, and I tell you, that window on some days could heat her whole flat.

Boom Boom

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brussels sprout leaves
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2007, 07:31:17 PM »
Quote from: skdadl
A friend has one in a south-facing kitchen, and I tell you, that window on some days could heat her whole flat.



I've got some tall windows on the south end, and, yeah, a lot of sunlight comes through and heats that end of the trailer. The cactii love it, too. Since I moved here in July, one of my cactus plants has sprouted tiny pink flowers, probably out of appreciation for their new location (they never sprouted flowers in the apartment I had). I'm going to add one or two indoor plants every year I'm here (which may not be long, given how close I came to a heart attack today, but enough of that...). The former owners of this place had some great hebrs growing in the garden at the back, I hope they sprout again. I still want a new hreenhouse, too. Geez, so many possibilities with this place.  :)

 

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