Author Topic: cheap but good, and not too boring?  (Read 35447 times)

lagatta

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Re: cheap but good, and not too boring?
« Reply #135 on: March 16, 2011, 01:38:39 PM »
Or perhaps the South Asian technique of opening up the spices via sautéeing changes the chemistry in some way? Indeed I've never found those spices bitter when prepared in the various South Asian cuisines.

My bean and bit-of-meat stew is yummy, by the way, and certainly cost less than $5 for several servings. It is usually eaten with rice.

skdadl, I've never had "spiced beef" and it sounds delicious.

There can be cinnamon in chile con carne (or sin carne), which is certainly North American, whether from Mexico or the Southwestern US. I suspect that is a Moorish influence via the Spaniards.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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Re: cheap but good, and not too boring?
« Reply #136 on: March 16, 2011, 02:03:42 PM »
I keep planning to spice a brisket every fall and then I never do it (I have once). I have a big stone container meant for that sort of thing, weeks of turning in the spices and I guess vinegar/wine (forget recipe -- the ones I see online aren't as genuine as Mrs Rombauer in Joy of Cooking).

There is a great butcher on Summerhill (Rosedale side) in Toronto who sells expert ones in December, but only then, alas.

The Mexicans use chocolate with meat and chilis. Now, that is definitely not veddy British.

Antonia

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Re: cheap but good, and not too boring?
« Reply #137 on: March 16, 2011, 03:29:08 PM »
Lots of replies.

First, let me just say that the NYT is running cheap and easy bean-based  quesillida recipes this week.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/16/health/nutrition/16recipehealth.html?emc=tnt&tntemail1=y

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I'll eat fish with anything (sorry, Antonia)...

I would kill for some real bouillabaise or other French fish soup with a bucketful of rouille. Just not available in Toronto.

On the same thought, I gave up wild salmon oil caps as of yesterday when my last bottle ran out. I'd been taking them for the Omega-3s for years. I bought a vegan citrus-flavoured oil to replace it, made of blugloss seeds and algae or some such siht.
http://www.ascentahealth.com/cynthia-sass
Tried it this morning. It's been repeating on me all day.  :pukey

I remember my first few tastes of cilantro. Hated it. Now love it.

As for spicing brisket, Montreal steak spice is the best. It's also what you find on smoked meat.

http://www.montrealfood.com/mtlsteak.html

Also this is awesome: Please tweet it if you can #Nourish
http://www.thestar.com/living/food/article/954575--campbell-s-cans-hunger

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That “more” took less than 18 months to create and will start rolling off the production line at the Etobicoke plant next week.
It’s called Nourish and it’s a complete meal because each 425-gram can provides a full serving of three food groups, including vegetables, grains and protein.
Packed with a Canadian supergrain called naked oats, Nourish comes in vegetarian and chicken flavours. It can be eaten straight from the can if there is no place to heat it and it tastes good.
The first 100,000 cans will be donated to Food Banks Canada.
Campbell’s hopes its Facebook and Twitter campaign will trigger another 100,000 donations by Hunger Awareness Day on May 31.

ETA: Links
« Last Edit: March 16, 2011, 03:45:08 PM by Antonia »
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld

skdadl

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Re: cheap but good, and not too boring?
« Reply #138 on: March 16, 2011, 04:33:30 PM »

As for spicing brisket, Montreal steak spice is the best. It's also what you find on smoked meat.


No -- I don't think ppl quite get what "spiced beef" is until they have it. It doesn't taste anything like corned beef, smoked meat, pastrami, etc -- those are all savoury/smoky/pickled.

Spiced beef is indeed sweet, all on its own. It goes very red, cherry red, and there's nothing like it.

lagatta

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Re: cheap but good, and not too boring?
« Reply #139 on: March 31, 2011, 09:20:18 AM »
I made some muharrama early this morning. http://www.whats4eats.com/sauces/muhammara-recipe For this dish to come into the "cheap but good" category, you have to get a good price on walnuts - thanks, supermarché PA!

Several variations of this Levantine dip use pomegranate molasses for the tart-sweet taste. It is not necessarily easy to find, and would increase the cost for me, as I rarely use it for anything else. I substitute some sumac powder, which I always have for other Levantine and also Greek dishes, for a similar tart accent. There is plenty of natural sweetness in these ingredients between the onion and roasted red pepper.

I used pre-roasted, jarred red peppers, which often go on sale in Mediterranean supermarkets. Even rinsed, they are somewhat salty so I didn't add any salt, but that is a matter of taste as is the amount of hot spice. As for many of these recipes, I cut down on the olive oil and use more lemon juice, though one can always use a bit of water if it is too thick.

I don't have a food processor. I chop everything by hand, then finish blending it with a stick immersion blender.

All my friends like this - I don't make it very hot (I'll make a super-fiery version for Mandos).

By the way Antonia, they had roast chickens with Montreal steak spice at the market. It is quite a versatile blend. I'm sure it would suit some root vegetables, for a vegetarian meal.

Muhammara is vegan, if anyone is interested in that.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2011, 09:22:41 AM by lagatta »
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Antonia

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Re: cheap but good, and not too boring?
« Reply #140 on: March 31, 2011, 03:30:11 PM »
Cool, thanks. I have all the ingredients right in my kitchen for this, plus pomegranate molasses and sumac!
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld

 

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