Author Topic: Garden planning  (Read 84674 times)

skdadl

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Garden planning
« on: January 28, 2007, 05:57:03 PM »
So is anyone thinking about starting seedlings indoors? Did anyone save rhizomes or tubers from last year that could maybe be brought back to life starting a few weeks from now?

Yes, I know ... This is wishful thinking, jumping the gun, and all that. But it isn't so far away, not so far. Gardens need prep, and we need to be thinking ahead.

All voices of experience about any growing thing welcome. Any good online sources especially welcome.

This is the first year in so many that I have not had a set of forced hyacinths sitting in my kitchen about now. Does anyone else have hyacinths or tulips or crocii on their windowsills? Happy daffy daffs?

faith

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« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2007, 06:13:44 PM »
YES! I have been contemplating getting things started because out here on the west coast you can actually have a harvest of plants that love cool temperatures by April or May, like snow peas, lettuce, green onions and some others.
I was wondering about a sweet potato that I have in a basket in the kitchen window that has green leaves sprouting out of it, could I plant the potato and would it grow?

I was reading the latest Harrowsmith magazine and some of the helpful tips were great for an early garden. One of the tips that I am definitely going to use is using the plastic clam shell lettuce containers as a sort of greenhouse seed starter kit.
just picture it

Boom Boom

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« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2007, 06:28:14 PM »
I started a thread like this on babble, as an outgrowth of another thread. I forgot about youse guys! :oops:

Anyway, I'll be starting a few indoor plants in March (too early right now). Here's some stuff I have on order:

Seeds: German Chamomile, Music Box Sunflower Mix, Autumn Beauty Sunflower Mix, Razzmatazz Sunflower Mix, Go Bananas Sunflower Mix,
Eastern Butterwax Bean, Provider Beans, Wax Bean Collection, Varied Carrot Collection, Temptation Strawberry (to start indoors), Red Beauty Onion, Sweet Pepper Collection (to start indoors), Varied Tomato Collection (to start indoors), Varied Cuke Collection, Perennial Herb Collection, Annual Herb Collection, Sun Carrot, Parade Organic Onion,
Howden Organic Pumpkin, Tyee Organic Spinach;

and: Jersey Giant Asparagus Roots  :garden

skdadl

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« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2007, 06:32:40 PM »
Look at these women in BC.

Go to their Plants Index, and then on to pages like this one on species lilies.

faith

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« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2007, 07:08:17 PM »
Gardening in BC is a mania, people have the most fantastic gardens I have ever seen, unfortunately I am not among their number.

But I will keep on trying.

I was thinking of some early lettuce, some snow peas, chives, green beans, and of course we have some garlic in the ground that was planted in October.

I discovered Japanese eggplant last year and absolutely loved it as a vegetable and will be growing it again. My English cukes did well as did my beefsteak tomatoes and my golden tomatoes. We had golden beefsteaks as well and they were delicious if you like sweet and mild rather than tangy tomatoes.

I will not bother with peppers as they were very slow growing and I did not get a good crop except for these little wee peppers that were so hot you couldn't let them near your mouth.
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Boom Boom

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« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2007, 07:19:44 PM »
My favourite online places:

http://www.seeds.ca/en.php (Seeds of Diversity)

http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/ (Veseys)

http://www.dominion-seed-house.com/en-CA/  (Dominon Seed House)

faith

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« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2007, 07:56:19 PM »
Boom Boom your plan for your garden sounds ambitious. I like the looks of some of the new carrots I have seen, or maybe they're very old carrot varieties, but I would particularly like to try the golden carrots I have seen and the golden beets I ate in a restaurant last year.
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Boom Boom

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Re: gardens
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2007, 09:12:51 PM »
I forgot to mention I'll also be planting: Sugar Baby Watermelon, Yellow Doll Watermelon, Early Purple Top White Globe turnip, York Turnip, and
Solid Gold Watermelon.  :eat  And that's in addition to about eight flower varieties from last year.

kuri

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« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2007, 09:23:29 PM »
I have a lot of seeds stored up - some of them impulse purchases - and I don't know if I'll use them. I'm planning a small garden: 2 or 3 square metres only. I can always expand in subsequent years if I want to.

My main project will be to build a composter, following a pretty simple plan in You Grow Girl, by Gayla Trail (which I always suspected is a pen name, but maybe not). Anyway, we we'll be building a new deck and replacing all the pipes in our house this summer, the garden will have to be rather unambitious if I'm to keep my sanity.

The only thing I'll be starting early is a few tomato plants (I wasn't even going to do that, but I can't resist) and the rest will be planted in the spring. I'm not sure what the final mix will be except I know I want bucketsfull of Swiss chard. I love that stuff and you can rarely find it in the grocery store.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2007, 09:28:04 PM »
Q: how long do seeds keep in those small paper packets before you have to plant them? I'm going to have far more seeds than space to plant them all - although I could plant them out in the bush, on Crown land... :spy:

Berlynn

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« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2007, 12:55:05 AM »
Oh, gardening at BnR!  I truly am in the right place!

I'm picking up seeds from Prairie Garden Seeds in a couple of weeks and then I'll start seedlings, especially tomatoes.  Did not have near enough tomatoes last year.  And my cukes were toast.  And the damned tree squirrels ate my zucchini!  From my kitchen window I watched one chow down on a 6-8 inch one.  It was all gone before I realized what went down!  I think I'll grow those on trellises this year.

Oh, and I love canning almost as much as growing.  I have the best pickle and relish recipes, one of which has been passed down on my dad's side of the family for 5 generations.  The best dills ever!

Wish I could enjoy weeding, though!  Too many years on the farm.  Serious first-born daughter action.

Ah, so what was the question?  Am I thinking about gardening?  Gawd, yes, I surely am!  I mean, what else can one do in SK in January?

PS:  Has anyone read Bob Kroetsch's, Seed Catalogue?
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

skdadl

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« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2007, 07:40:43 AM »
Quote
Did not have near enough tomatoes last year


Berlynn, you must be a serious canner. I have never heard anyone else who grows tomatoes say that there weren't enough. People here start doing desperate things with the tomato overflow by end August. You run from friends who are trying to press some upon you.  :wink:

Sadly, my first major operation in the garden in spring -- after I've cleared out all the dead weeds before the new ones can get started -- is going to have to be removing the dear dead birch. Hell: that lovely tree stood, but broken, all last summer as a reproach and an emblem of misery -- I just couldn't bear to do anything about it.

I think that my beautiful new climbing rose came through all the neglect, though. I planted her in summer '05, after taking three days to dig out a sick red currant bush that I had never liked anyway to make room. She  didn't flower last summer and was eventually obscured by weeds --   :oops:  -- but I have since beaten a path to her and she looks to me to have taken hold.  This should be her first year of glory. I've grown her before -- her real name is Shropshire Lass, but we used to call ours Ariadne because of the vast webs she sent out. She has very dark green shiny leaves, and in mid-June she will be covered every day for weeks with pale pink buds which open flat white, like a wild rose, during the day.

I must take care of her this year. And I must be more grateful to the Arctic blue willow, which is so gorgeous but deserves more regular haircuts.

lagatta

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« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2007, 08:36:10 AM »
Not precisely garden planning, but is anyone good at taking slips from geraniums, both the flowering kind and the scented ones? I saved several geraniums this winter (very sunny front room) and have a huge gnarled lemon geranium. I want to cut it back quite a bit, but make a daughter plant or two from it.

I'm not always successful, either in water (rots) or in vermiculite (doesn't take)...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
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Sleeping Sun

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« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2007, 08:54:06 AM »
What is this "garden planning" you are talking about?

skdadl

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« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2007, 09:01:12 AM »
lagatta, I have had pelargonium-propagation success just by plunking the cuttings straight into soil.

If you have one of those seed trays that look sort of like ice-cube trays (or maybe just use an ice-cube tray?), then fill all the little compartments with some soil; insert 3-inch pieces of stem in each one, and water lightly.

I forget how long it takes before you can see them beginning to leaf again, but they will -- you may lose a few, but mostly that works.

NB: Pelargonium is technically the correct name for the plants we're talking about here; true geraniums are bushy and fairly hardy perennials, also very beautiful, often blue or purply-pink.

 

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