Author Topic: Garden planning  (Read 88867 times)

lagatta

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« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2007, 09:12:28 AM »
Yes, I knew they weren't true geraniums; very hardy plants, those, we've planted some in front of the co-op, along with other perennials. But that is what people usually call pelargoniums, both the ones with bright flowers and the ones with a variety of lacy, scented leaves.

Pelargoniums aren't hardy here, but in somewhat milder temperate climates they are perennial; in Perugia they become big, gnarly bushes full of red flowers - and Perugia gets a few degrees of frost, and some snow most every year (not this one...) because it is atop a very high hill or small mountain, and the area is very hilly, rising to low mountains (Appenine ridge). Mine were outside this autumn almost until December, which is unheard of here. They kept flowering.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Debra

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« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2007, 09:18:02 AM »
I brought in a geranium, about 4 large coleus, and a trailing plant.

The cats destroyed the coleus, the kids knocked over the urn containing the rest of the plants and all I have left is the trailing plant.  :x

I really want to start seeds and I always say I will and then I don't. So like a Stanley Cup...maybe this year.  :D
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Boom Boom

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« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2007, 09:20:46 AM »
Quote from: Sleeping Sun
What is this "garden planning" you are talking about?


For me, it's 'planning the garden'. I'm weighing the balance between what I want to plant, against what I actually have space for. I'm going to have the perimeter of my property (on the shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, of which I have an excellent view from my LR) seeded with sunflowers, which will be sort of a fence between mine and both my neighbours properties. I have two small flower gardens, and one good-sized veggie garden, which will have quite a variety of herbs, veggies, and fruits, all of which are expensive at the local store. I'm hoping to build a greenhouse, but that will depend on the cost.

'lance

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« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2007, 10:06:40 AM »
And for me it's actually planning just to have a garden -- for the first time in sixteen year, by gar. This nice old duplex back in Victoria was the last place I've lived where I could have a garden, and I moved out of there before I could harvest.

I suppose I could dig up a portion of the grassy quad at this building, though the landscum would probably frown on it. Pity, because it's kind of scraggly and poorly-kept as it is. Probably not enough sunlight, though.

But never mind all that -- this year I'm finally getting a plot at the nearest community garden. Which is still around ten blocks away, but whatever.

Berlynn

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« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2007, 10:40:51 AM »
Quote from: lagatta
Not precisely garden planning, but is anyone good at taking slips from geraniums, both the flowering kind and the scented ones?


I've never done it myself, but my Auntie used to do it all the time.  She'd take a couple of cuttings, plant them in potting soil and cover each one with a clear glass to get the hot house effect.  Worked like a charm!  She always had great geraniums.  Unfortunately, she no longer gardens and I firmly believe that's part of the reason for her on-and-off depression.
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

Berlynn

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« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2007, 10:56:06 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
Berlynn, you must be a serious canner.

Ah, skdadl, yes, I come from a long line of good peasant stock!  And yes, I take it seriously.  I'm a little miffed that we'll run out of tomato sauce, salsa, and dills before spring, but it couldn't be helped.  I also tried sauerkraut last fall and failed miserably.  October is not a good time for me to be canning!

Quote from: skdadl
Sadly, my first major operation in the garden in spring -- after I've cleared out all the dead weeds before the new ones can get started -- is going to have to be removing the dear dead birch.

I cried, when at our last house the neighbour hacked out a beautiful honeysuckle that bloomed ferociously each year.  I can't imagine removing a beloved tree myself, even if it wasn't healthy.  I'd have to salvage part of it for yard art or something!

I lucked into a plum tree last fall and planted it in our front yard.  I really want plum sauce this summer!  But I wanted nanking cherry jam last year and it didn't happen.  The trick to fruit trees, I've learned, is to harvest the fruit before the birds do!

Quote from: skdadl
I think that my beautiful new climbing rose came through all the neglect, though.


Oh, I love roses.  We have two native prairie roses out front and a 3rd of a different variety which I discovered upon hard-pruning the lilac monster that stands across the sidewalk from the new plum tree.  I wish I could have a willow but I don't know of any drought tolerant types that would stand for the -25 we felt overnight.

One of the reasons I fell in love with this place is the trees.  Another is the gardens.  Perennial beds all around the front, all around the back, and there's a lovely, sunny patch for vegetables -- all on a 125-foot lot.  The blooms start in April and they go on strong until October.  Kinda makes the intervening months tolerable.   :wink:

(ETA: counting error on roses0
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

lagatta

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« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2007, 11:03:49 AM »
Should I start the geranium cuttings now, or wait a few weeks?
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Berlynn

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« Reply #22 on: January 29, 2007, 11:07:34 AM »
Quote from: lagatta
Should I start the geranium cuttings now, or wait a few weeks?


I remember her having them in pots on her birthday in early February.  But I suppose that might depend on where you live...
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

lagatta

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« Reply #23 on: January 29, 2007, 11:09:28 AM »
That sounds about right - the days are noticeably longer then, and the light changes. Think I'll do it at the Lunar New Year.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Berlynn

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« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2007, 11:16:19 AM »
Yes, after Brighid's Day should be perfect.  (Not a great link, but a link, nonetheless.  Oh, I'll bet the Druid's link is better.)  

Anyway, I'd forgotten that lovely day is this week!  Oh, the sun is returning and within a dozen weeks, there may be blooms in my yard!!! :D
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

chcmd

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« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2007, 11:37:37 AM »
Quote from: Boom Boom
Q: how long do seeds keep in those small paper packets before you have to plant them? I'm going to have far more seeds than space to plant them all - although I could plant them out in the bush, on Crown land... :spy:


Seeds are usually good for a couple of years as long as you store them thoughtfully (dry, not too cold, dark)

Oh I really miss gardening in BC, what a change here on the east coast!  I would do anything to have a greenhouse so I could start seedings etc., but it's really not feasable here in the house (drives the family crazy, little pots of seedlings cluttering up every space that light comes in!).

I have really had to change my gardening routine, most especially the start date!  So darned cold out here in the spring!  I bought some really cool "hats" from Lee Valley that protect the spring babies from the cold, so I can do some gardening before June *hrumph*.

I drag my geraniums inside for the winter and put them in a sunny spot in the house.  They make out really well - I have 5 pots that will be going back outside in the summer for the fourth year, they are really big!  They flower all winter too.

I have a Rosemary bush that I plant in the garden in its container and dig up and put in the garage (by the window) for the winter.  It is a good 4 years old and stands about 3 feet tall.  I think I will have to transplant it into a 1/2 barrel this spring - god knows how I will get it inside next winter!
Feel the fear and do it anyway

lagatta

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« Reply #26 on: January 29, 2007, 11:49:07 AM »
I see the Year of the Pig stamp is out now. Though not the thing to send to observant Muslims or Jews!
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

shaolin

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« Reply #27 on: January 29, 2007, 11:49:25 AM »
I wish I had a garden to plan!  I also wish I knew how to garden!  There is a student allotment that some friends are involved in, and a group has been talking about trying to get a plot in one of the community gardens, but I still need to know how.  With cooking, I taught myself.  With growing food, I am not so confident.  I feel like some hand holding.  I am still contemplating wwoofing.

We have a small space out back where I work.  Last year someone planted a bunch of bulbs, so we had some nice cut flowers in the space grown right here, instead of brought in by the wholesaler.

I am struggling to get our compost up and running again.  I am very nervous because there is strong resistance by certain folks involved (we were once shut down for two days by environmental health due to flies and rats).  I've been doing lots of reading, and I know in theory it should not be a problem, but the nay-sayers have given me the fear!

Boom Boom

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« Reply #28 on: January 29, 2007, 11:51:07 AM »
From the other thread on 'nutritionism':

8. Cook. And if you can, plant a garden. To take part in the intricate and endlessly interesting processes of providing for our sustenance is the surest way to escape the culture of fast food and the values implicit in it: that food should be cheap and easy; that food is fuel and not communion. The culture of the kitchen, as embodied in those enduring traditions we call cuisines, contains more wisdom about diet and health than you are apt to find in any nutrition journal or journalism.  Plus, the food you grow yourself contributes to your health long before you sit down to eat it. So you might want to think about putting down this article now and picking up a spatula or hoe.

Berlynn

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« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2007, 12:12:21 PM »
Quote from: shaolin
I am struggling to get our compost up and running again.  I am very nervous because there is strong resistance by certain folks involved (we were once shut down for two days by environmental health due to flies and rats).


Some people get really weird about compost bins.  I mean, would they rather the flies and rats were in their houses?!?  Our composter is an old plastic garbage can -- a big one -- with about 100 holes drilled in it for aeration.  We fill it up then work it into the garden each spring and fall.  Makes for great soil.

Below are just some of my gardening links (some may well be dead).  I find I don't visit them as often as I once did.  I was heavily into container gardening at our last house and found some great links and had some success with it.  It's great for an urban space.  Mostly, I think, gardening is a matter of trial and error.  Don't be afraid to try and don't be afraid to fail.  In fact, be prepared to be the biggest failure ever and you'll be pleased with the results!

http://www.herbfresh.com/oldindex.htm
http://www.aces.edu/department/extcomm/ ... -1139.html
http://www.suite101.com/articles.cfm/bohemian_balcony
http://www.botany.com/
http://www.winnipeg-bugline.com/comp_pl.html
http://www.canadiangardening.com/
http://www.transy.edu/homepages/wells/index.htm
http://www.cityfarmer.org/urbagnotes1.html#notes
http://paridss.usask.ca/specialcrop/com ... links.html
http://www.hitech.net.au/utegrrl/table.htm
http://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html#LARKSPUR:
http://www.wimall.com/lifeisgood/index003.html
http://www.bagelhole.org/article.php/Food/122/
http://www.rainyside.com/edibles/
http://www.cityregina.com/services/enviro/compost.shtml
http://www.familygardening.com/
http://berrygrape.orst.edu/fruitgrowing ... rowing.htm
http://soilandhealth.org/03sovereigntyl ... 05ch5.html
http://www.hickson.com/planterbench.gif
http://home.golden.net/%7Estinson/Pondsandpools.html
http://www.GardenGateMagazine.com/
http://familyhaven.com/gardening/index.html
http://www.wholeherb.com/PAGES/HOME/HerbOutdoor.html
http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/rhubarb-growing.html
http://www.bhg.com/default.sph/bhg.clas ... 72___1___3
http://www.gardenguides.com/TipsandTech ... tainer.htm
http://160.79.243.32/herbs/herbs1208.html
http://www.homestore.com/lawngarden/law ... s/site.asp
http://www.hooked.net/users/verdant/food.htm
http://www.freespace.net/%7Ecog-pww/Jan ... etter.html
http://www.execpc.com/%7Emjstouff/artic ... weeds.html
http://community-2.webtv.net/BUDMUGS/LucysGarden/
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Troy/22 ... #summaries
http://208.156.226.50/articledetails.taf?id=124
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/pars ... ive20.html
http://www.groworganic.com/
http://em.ca/garden/home.html
http://www.egardenplace.com/?BISKIT=315 ... cat&cat=43
http://www.dlcwest.com/%7Erhs/newsletter.html
http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/util/rescon ... ng/faq.htm
http://www.taoherbfarm.com/herbs/resources/drought1.htm
http://www.ext.vt.edu/departments/envir ... tgrdn.html
http://www.greenbuilder.com/sourcebook/ ... line4.html
http://www.flinet.com/%7Egallus/sqft.html
http://www.tvorganics.com/main.cfm?acti ... tterTips#3
http://www.silverlf.com/barrick/
http://garden-gate.prairienet.org/teaching.htm
http://colleenscorner.com/Garden.html
http://gardeninglaunchpad.com/
http://www.kcinter.net/%7Emule/
http://www.urbangarden.com/
http://icangarden.com/OrganicGrowing/organic16.htm
http://www.weeksberry.com/BLUE.HTML
http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/veggies/
http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/veggies/watermelon1.html
http://pollinator.com/Identify/whatsbuzzin.htm
http://www.freeyellow.com/members6/wiseweeds/
http://www.wildaboutgardening.org/en/gr ... /index.htm
http://www.beniciagarden.com/
http://www.transy.edu/homepages/wells/pond.htm
http://hometown.aol.com/rosebasil/VOODOOSTIX.html
http://www.organicgardening.com/feature ... 50,00.html
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

 

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