Author Topic: Garden planning  (Read 88887 times)

Debra

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« Reply #30 on: January 29, 2007, 12:38:26 PM »
I've been looking for a cheap easy but covered composter, Berlynn. The garbage pail sounds like just the thing.

Can I get more info? Do you put an soil in it? keep it in sun or shade? water it all? do you get any smell off it?
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shaolin

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« Reply #31 on: January 29, 2007, 12:44:30 PM »
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Some people get really weird about compost bins. I mean, would they rather the flies and rats were in their houses?!? Our composter is an old plastic garbage can -- a big one -- with about 100 holes drilled in it for aeration. We fill it up then work it into the garden each spring and fall. Makes for great soil.


I suppose for us the problem is it is a cafe, not a home, and therefore we must contend with the environmental health folks.  If something goes wrong and there is a fly or rat infestation just outside our doors that is bad, bad, bad.

The other thing is that we don't have a compelling use for all the good compost we'll create (think 30 avocados, 15 heads of lettuce, 20 tomatoes, 20 peppers, oodles of coffee grinds, etc each day).  For me, that quantity is the exact reason we need to be composting and not sending it to the landfill.

So, right now we're trying to decide whether to go with the council provided black bin (bottomless), or to buy an expensive, but perhaps 'safer' worm compost.

Berlynn - if you use a garbage bin for your compost, does that mean you don't turn it at all?

brebis noire

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« Reply #32 on: January 29, 2007, 12:46:35 PM »
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Our composter is an old plastic garbage can -- a big one -- with about 100 holes drilled in it for aeration.  We fill it up then work it into the garden each spring and fall.  Makes for great soil.


You just described my composter!  :) However, I can't vouch for the quality of the soil it produces because although I compost vast amounts, I'm not very good at taking care of it. Actually, the old plastic garbage can isn't big enough for what I produce (at least during the winter when it just piles up) and comes out the bottom isn't quite soil-ready. So what I do is dig a big ol' hole in the garden in the spring and bury it so it can continue composting out of sight. I trust the critters to take care of the rest, I can't do all the work around here.  :wink:

skdadl

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« Reply #33 on: January 29, 2007, 01:08:17 PM »
shaolin, although I haven't noticed them so much around the Forth, whenever we drove to the north of Scotland (north of Drumochter Pass, maybe), I would begin to notice a lot of homes with geodesic domes in their back gardens -- I assume those are greenhouses, the only way northerners could be growing something like tomatoes. On the north coast around Thurso/Scrabster, almost every home seemed to have a dome. So someone in Scotland is keen on producing them.

Berlynn

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« Reply #34 on: January 29, 2007, 02:08:16 PM »
Quote from: Debra
I've been looking for a cheap easy but covered composter, Berlynn. The garbage pail sounds like just the thing.

Can I get more info? Do you put an soil in it? keep it in sun or shade? water it all? do you get any smell off it?


I don't know where I got the idea, but there's this.  At our first house we (ah, I guess that's DH) built a beautiful, double-binned composter so we could have two batches going at once.  The kidlings were small then and they loved to help move it around.  At the container planting house, we came up with the bin thing which we filled with kitchen scraps, then mixed with old soil, grass cuttings and leaves.

Now, it gets filled it with whatever, gets set wherever, dumped into the garden in the spring, and worked it into the soil.  I have a patch at the back where I (ah, uh, we) do the bulk of the mixing.  I still do some container planting, so I dump the old soil back there,too, and enrich it.  I also do some trench composting too.  We have heavy clay soil here so amendments to the soil are essential.

But to the compost collected in the bin itself, I do nada.  Nix.  Nothing.  By the end of winter, though, it is overflowing and we did discuss getting another bin happening.  But then, we've discussed many things and our follow-through isn't always 100%.

As for the cafe, you might want to consider worm composting.  It's a much more tidy way of composting.
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

'lance

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« Reply #35 on: January 29, 2007, 02:24:34 PM »
I plan to start with worm composting, under the kitchen sink. Vancouver will sell you a worm composter for $25, provided you attend a one-hour session on how to use it.

When the quantities start to build up, I'll transfer them to some sort of bin in the courtyard. Landscum shouldn't get too exercised about that, provided it doesn't smell enough for anyone to complain. And in case of rats, there are plenty of neighbourhood (outdoor) cats -- including one 20-pounder who lives upstairs, and apparently regards the courtyard as his personal fiefdom.

gunnar gunnarson

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« Reply #36 on: January 29, 2007, 04:21:40 PM »
Where did I read it ... ?

"The English will garden on the ash-heap of Hell."

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #37 on: January 29, 2007, 09:31:48 PM »
Quote from: gunnar gunnarson
Where did I read it ... ? "The English will garden on the ash-heap of Hell."
And run the chip fryer (or would it be the friar chipper?  :? ) as well ... :wink:

Boom Boom

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« Reply #38 on: January 29, 2007, 09:40:18 PM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Quote from: gunnar gunnarson
Where did I read it ... ? "The English will garden on the ash-heap of Hell."
And run the chip fryer (or would it be the friar chipper?  :? ) as well ... :wink:


Reminds me of the joke about the Monastic Cafe run by the Chip monk and the Fish friar.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #39 on: February 04, 2007, 01:15:39 PM »
Found some great links to greenhouses and building them. I have a pile of old windows that I think I'll use to make a small greenhouse out on the edge of the property, and a modern plastic greenhouse right against the main house, 'lean-to' style. I'm going crazy with ordering seeds and seedlings for the spring. Now I'm ordering roses, and a couple of trees, as well as all those veggies and flowers for planting. :garden

skdadl

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« Reply #40 on: February 04, 2007, 01:29:51 PM »
Oh, I want to go and visit my fledgling rose, but it is so demmed cold here.

Winter: enough, already.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #41 on: February 04, 2007, 01:48:14 PM »
The wind here is unreal. I and my house may end up in Kansas tonight.  :shock:

kuri

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« Reply #42 on: February 04, 2007, 01:52:10 PM »
If you end up in Kansas, boom boom, winter will end earlier. :)

Just randomly, today, I started a golden pear-shaped tomato in a peat pot that I'd had leftover because whatever I'd planted in there before didn't take. I wasn't planning on starting any tomatoes from seed - I was just going to get a few plants already started at the garden centre - but I had an extra peat pot with soil, so I thought I'd try it out again.

So far, the parsley and the catnip are the greatest successes. We moved our basil and sage (the laggards) upstairs and hopefully the extra warmth will do them good. It was when we moved the catnip upstairs that it really took off.

It's snowing here again. :(

alisea

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« Reply #43 on: February 04, 2007, 01:54:45 PM »
I just looked at the weather for Natashquan, in Boom Boom's neck of the woods. The ambient temp's -12°C, the wind chill's -26, and the wind is 74 gusting to 98.

Let us all, together, send warm and calming thoughts  :lol:  :lol:

And if they don't work, BB, I'd put those red shoes on pronto, just in case you need them later :-)
Do not meddle with the Forces of Nature, for you are small, insignificant, and biodegradable.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #44 on: February 04, 2007, 02:51:04 PM »
Thanks for the warm thoughts. Natshquan is 44 km away by skidoo, about 30 as the crow flies. I had to put duct tape around the main door entrance, because the wind is so strong it's able to blow through the weatherstripping. Now, where are my ruby slippers?  :oops:

 

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