Author Topic: sometimes more things have happened in our military history  (Read 101505 times)

Bacchus

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sometimes more things have happened in our military history
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2007, 11:03:40 PM »
Croghan, my mother knew several VCs, including Douglas Bader I think. She said he was deliberating annoying during golf games with his fake legs


edited to add
Just checked on bader; DSO and bar, DFC and bar, no VC
When you're on your own
When you're at a fork in the road
You don't know which way to go
There's too many signs and arrows
You haven't laughed in a while
When you can't even fake a smile
When you feel ashamed...
The uniform don't make you brave

Croghan27

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sometimes more things have happened in our military history
« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2007, 02:48:02 AM »
Bacchus ....

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Just checked on bader; DSO and bar, DFC and bar, no VC

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/2WWbaderD.htm

that's enough for me .. were I there I would have been forwever known as croghan27 CC*

My Uncle Doug managed to get himself shot down over France. I never met him, but I remember Aunt Margaret, as lovely a woman as ever was an aunt.
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The crew members who perished lie in the Bermering Communal Cemetery. P/O Eastham was from St.John, NB; and P/O Solomon was from Toronto, ON. There is no personal information on the RAF crew members, F/S Redstone or Sgt Abery
http://www.airforce.forces.gc.ca/14Wing/squadron/405_Bermering_e.asp

*cringing coward
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Croghan27

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« Reply #17 on: March 15, 2007, 03:54:40 AM »
March 15, 1900: The Royal Canadian Regt. arrives in Bloemfontein after taking part in the British 9th Division's drive to seize the Boer capital of the Orange Free State in South Africa. Although the Boers evacuated the city without a fight, the Canadians suffer heavy losses, owing to heat exhaustion and disease.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Croghan27

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« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2007, 07:34:45 PM »
Upon further investigation I found more to the story of the sinking of the Guysborough than is mentioned on my calender.

The change is below.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Croghan27

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« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2007, 01:18:31 AM »
March 19, 1978: The United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon is created with a goal of observing and confirming the withdrawal of Israeli military forces from southern Lebanon. Canadian participation in Operation Angora was to begin officially on April 13 with the arrival of 117 personnel from 1st Canadian Signal Regt.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Croghan27

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« Reply #20 on: March 21, 2007, 04:11:29 AM »
March 21, 1945: Not long after the loss of HMCS Guysborough, HMCS New Glasgow fatally damages U-1003 in waters off Londonderry. Thirty-one German survivors are subsequently rescued by Escort Group 25.

March 21, 1955: The Canadian government announces that a Distant Early Warning Line will be constructed in northern Canada. The DEW Line, as it became known, would consist of different types of radar facilities used to detect possible Soviet invasion, missile or air attacks directed across the Arctic.

March 21, 1898: The Yukon Field Force is organized to maintain Canadian sovereignty and authority in the Klondike. Consisting of 203 permanent force soldiers, the force’s job is to oversee law and order in the goldfields.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

lagatta

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« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2007, 06:58:27 AM »
DNA solves mystery of Vimy Ridge soldier
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EDMONTON — Doreen Bargholz's family rarely talked about her uncle, Private Herbert Peterson.

His parents and five brothers were heartbroken when the 22-year-old soldier from rural Alberta never returned from the muddy French battlefields of the First World War. The military told them he had gone missing, and was presumed dead.

"There was a big photo of him hanging in my grandparents' living room. That's how I knew him," the 78-year-old Ms. Bargholz said in an interview.

But thanks to hard work by a team of Canadian scientists, genealogists and Defence Department historians and officials, the private's body was recovered in 2003 and identified earlier this year.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Toedancer

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« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2007, 01:13:28 PM »
Yo Croghan I couldn't find a thing for today's date. At least nothing Canadian. So I went to America:

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In 1775, in a speech supporting the arming of the Virginia militia, Patrick Henry declared, "Give me liberty or give me death."
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

fern hill

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sometimes more things have happened in our military history
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2007, 01:16:23 PM »
Aw, Toe, that's sweet. Keeping up for our 'lost' Croghan. I hope he comes back soon.

Debra

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« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2007, 01:58:55 PM »
Croghan has joined the SAFS (the Slip and Fall Society)

He will be back with us when both he and his computer recover.
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Croghan27

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« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2007, 02:21:22 PM »
Quote from: fern hill
Aw, Toe, that's sweet. Keeping up for our 'lost' Croghan. I hope he comes back soon.


I really appreciate that, fern and Toe - my insecurities are bound, once again, into their caves and dens.  :D I had two problems, one was (just) solved by my computer guru, who I forcably dragged out of his pots to kick my machine in the proper place, The other that I was undone by the icy streets of Ottawa. I now have quite a respectable shiner, and a racked up back.

The good news is I have some great muscle relaxants for my back and am pretty happy.  :shock:

As for Canadian Military history - today is another day of preparations. I will not bother with posting about Vimy, as there is some very public  commemorations planned.

I just was reading something about (Sir) Arthur Currie the planner of the Vimy attack. Odd duck that he was, he actually planned to minimise casualities going operations unlike the overall Marshal, Douglas Haig. (I used to live in Crerar Court - a name from another war, just off Currie Ave).

Currie stands between two rather noteworthy Generals - like Napoleon, hs was an artillery officer, hense the beginning of the battle was marked by 1,000 guns firing, and by Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein. Both were noted for meticulous planning and attention of details in their operation.

Not bad company, eh?  :D
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

fern hill

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sometimes more things have happened in our military history
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2007, 02:27:47 PM »
First Boom Boom, now you.  :getwell:

Holly Stick

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« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2007, 02:53:31 PM »
Here's an article by Desmond Morton about Currie, www.cfsj.forces.gc.ca/oic/engraph/docs/EO_700_4/EO_700_4_Leadership_and_Ethics_Case_Study_Curry_en.pdf+%22arthur+currie%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=6&gl=ca]dated 15 November 2004[/url]:

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There is a great deal wrong with Arthur Currie as an exemplary military leader. I can almost guarantee that our neighbourly allies would never feature him without a lot of heavy cosmetics. Hollywood would have trouble finding a starring actor who wanted to risk his reputation on a man his subordinates called "Old Guts and Garters"...


I don't have time to read it all now, but it looks just fascinating; Currie, warts and brilliance and all.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Croghan27

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« Reply #28 on: March 24, 2007, 04:10:12 PM »
Why thank you Holly - I have never seen that article before, I was somewhat familiar with the details, but it put them into a fine context.

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The day before, the Germans had attacked two second class French divisions with chlorine gas
What I have been able to see is that these 'second class divisions' were really Moroccan conscripts - still dazzled by the new environment and war.

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This time he refused. First would come reconnaissance, training, artillery fire plans, bringing up supplies. The British fumed at colonial incompetence. But when Currie's men attacked, they scored a complete success.
That was a common complaint about 'Monty' - he would attack on his own time, not one dictated by others.

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Their style, thanks to Currie, was slow, methodical, thorough, and some who favour dash over planning have deplored it. Soldiers who bore the heavy loads and the consequent casualties, had no sympathy for the "Guts and Garters" but those who survived began to call themselves "the Ever- Victorious Corps".
A partial defense of the General Staff is that, as Donald Rumsfeld pointed out, "you go to war with the Army you have." Massed attacked into dangerous enemy positions were the one option they chose for their untrained troops. (A condemnation is that they were as unsuccussful as Rummy was.)

Morton is spot on to observe that all icons have some clay in their feet. Ulysses S. Grant was (or maybe was not) a drunk and a slave owner - and a failed busnessman (something that even now stops no one from being President): Napoleon was supposed to has sent a letter to Josephene after a battle saying, "Home in three says - do not wash.": Patton was something of deluded egotist, believing he was the latest incarnation of some immortals.

That Currie, the Real Estate salesman from BC could slip in other matters, is of little consequence - in the field he defeated the enemy, dazzled and infuriated his superiors and it is a shame he was for so long lumped in with the rest of the British/French senior staff. (Even if Bing seems to be the odd man out, in that he let Currie have his head.)
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Croghan27

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« Reply #29 on: March 24, 2007, 11:45:11 PM »
March 25, 1958: The CF-105 Avro Arrow flies for the first time at Malton, Ont. Planned to replace the aging CF-100, the Arrow is the most advanced interceptor of the period.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

 

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