Author Topic: "New Government" staff mess-up, volunteers blamed  (Read 3012 times)

deBeauxOs

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"New Government" staff mess-up, volunteers blamed
« on: April 06, 2007, 11:37:53 AM »
Quote
Canadian officials are scrambling to correct a number of glaring French grammar mistakes and spelling errors on plaques erected at the new war memorial in Vimy Ridge, France.

News emerged Thursday that French signs inside the memorial's visitors centre were rife with mistakes -- with just days to go before world leaders, including Prime Minister Stephen Harper, gather for a memorial on Monday to mark the 90th anniversary of the battle at Vimy Ridge.


What pisses me off about this incident is that they are blaming the volunteers.  

On Radio-Canada, they interviewed Michel Drapeau, a member of the planning committee and he deplored the fact that none of the members representing Canada's New Government, who constantly flew back and forth to France at great public expense, will take responsibility for this gaffe.  Now of course, this will fuel public resentment about how francophones are so fussy about translations.  As if all Canadians would not be shamed if text written in English, full of grammatical and spelling errors, were put on a memorial in Britain, say.  

Link to CTV story.

More, at Radio-Canada.

lagatta

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"New Government" staff mess-up, volunteers blamed
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2007, 10:51:05 AM »
Les blues d'une traductrice

Comme elle dit, de telles traductions ne doivent pas réléver de bénévoles.il faut les confier à des traducteurs professiionnels.

Translating does not involve only bilingualism, it is a writing profession, like journalism, editing etc.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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"New Government" staff mess-up, volunteers blamed
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2007, 10:58:54 AM »
One of the current requirements for government translators is a degree in translation.  There is formal knowledge of linguistics, grammar, language required as well as the actual training.  

Many of my peers learned 'sur le tas' before such programs were created, and their language proficiency and rigueur in finding le mot juste served them well. I do not accept translation assignments in the course of a free-lancing job unless it's understood to be a loose adaptation of material in the other official language.  I am not competent in those skills at all.

lagatta

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"New Government" staff mess-up, volunteers blamed
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2007, 11:09:54 AM »
Yes, I couldn't get a full-time government position these days for that reason. This is a problem for many competent people of the older generation, also among journalists. I know excellent journalists (though most have retired by now, or almost) who don't even have a university degree.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

 

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