Author Topic: Anyone celebrating Easter/Passover?  (Read 10537 times)

belva

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Anyone celebrating Easter/Passover?
« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2007, 02:39:45 PM »
oh my--I'm going to be in the gym working off my Easter dinner for a week or more---gasp, it was good!

wildwomyn & I were part of a group of women who did a "carry-in" meal---everybody brought something & we put it all out buffet style---34 women & my gawd did we eat!  our host & her partner did a tasty & very tender ham--another woman did lamb--there were side dishes, salads, desserts, wine, beer, teas, coffee--I need to make special mention also of the spiced fruit punch, the apple-glazed lamb, the truffle cake, the baked rice pudding--*urp*--excuse me, please :oops:

I'm usually a breakfast person but this morning I could manage only my 2 glasses of water & my glass of juice

Mandos

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Anyone celebrating Easter/Passover?
« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2007, 02:44:27 PM »
The technical term for this is a "potluck".

deBeauxOs

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Anyone celebrating Easter/Passover?
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2007, 02:49:14 PM »
Quote from: Mandos
The technical term for this is a "potluck".
:rotfl:

Oh my!  The reason I am laughing is that in lesbian and/or feminist groups in the 1970's and 80's, the name for these events was "potluck networking" or, if one were looking for someone to date and disliked bars, the 'potluck circuit' was a good hunting ground, especially if one were into home-wrecking.  :shock:  

It amuses me that Mandos provided the 'technical term'.  :lol:

belva

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« Reply #18 on: April 09, 2007, 03:43:42 PM »
Quote from: Mandos
The technical term for this is a "potluck".

please refer to the following:
Quote
A potluck is a gathering of people where each person is expected to bring a dish of food to be shared among the group.

Synonyms include: potluck dinner, Jacob's join[1][2], Jacob's supper, faith supper, covered dish supper, pitch-in, carry-in.

The word "potluck" is sometimes thought to stem from the Native American custom of potlatch, but in fact the word is of English origin. It is a portmanteau word formed from (cooking) pot and luck. The earliest written citation is from 1592: "That that pure sanguine complexion of yours may never be famisht with pot lucke," Thomas Nashe.[3] As this shows, the original meaning was "food given away to guests", probably derived from "whatever food one is lucky enough to find in the pot", i.e. whatever food happens to be available, especially when offered to a guest. By extension, a more general meaning is "whatever is available in a particular circumstance or at a particular time."

Potluck dinners are often organized by religious or community groups, since they simplify the meal planning and distribute the costs among the participants. Smaller, more informal get-togethers with distributed food preparation may also be called potlucks. The only traditional rule is that each dish be large enough to be shared among a good portion (but not necessarily all) of the anticipated guests. In some cases each participant agrees ahead of time to bring a single course, and the result is a multi-course meal.

A variation on the potluck dinner is the rota meal, short for rotation. With rota, participants take turns providing food for the entire group, rather than each participant bringing a dish. For regular meals with a fairly consistent set of participants, this dramatically reduces the amount of preparation effort required.

 References
^ Partridge, Eric and Paul Beale. A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, 8th ed. (1984).
^ Bachelor, Lisa. "Surviving on a student budget." The Guardian, October 4, 2005
^ Oxford English Dictionary
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potluck"


please note this source says "carry in" is a recognized synonym :roll:

skdadl

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« Reply #19 on: April 09, 2007, 03:52:10 PM »
Not sure this is the same thing as a "rota meal," but when I was a teenager, several groups I knew had "progressive dinners," where the whole group would go to one home for one course, then move on to another home for the next, and so on -- we'd usually hit at least five people's places each time.

Maybe rota meals just mean that members of a group take turns being hosts -- my monthly lunch group do that in the summer -- but how then could you refer to "a" rota meal? Each one would just be, y'know, lunch. It would be the series that was a rota.

Mandos

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« Reply #20 on: April 09, 2007, 04:32:09 PM »
"Carry-in" is a rare and inferior term, as are all such terms as I do not use.

arborman

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« Reply #21 on: April 09, 2007, 05:57:55 PM »
Well, we went over to the island for roast lamb with the Greeks.  The full deal - spitted over charcoal in the front yard.  Lots of people & drinks.

I spent the while visit (3 days) shivering upstairs in bed with a brutal fever, which has not yet abated.  It sounded like they were enjoying themselves though.
The pleasures of the table are for every man, of every land, and no matter what place in history or society; they can be a part of all his other pleasures, and they last the longest, to console him when he has outlived the rest.

lagatta

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« Reply #22 on: April 09, 2007, 06:05:20 PM »
Covered-dish supper seems quite common. Could that be a term from the Southern US?

I see potluck in French (and not only fron Québec) and Spanish - because "à la fortune du pot" does not mean quite the same thing, although it must have at one time... Refers more to the art of scrounging up a meal from what is on hand.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Croghan27

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« Reply #23 on: April 09, 2007, 06:36:38 PM »
Quote from: skdadl
Not sure this is the same thing as a "rota meal," but when I was a teenager, several groups I knew had "progressive dinners," where the whole group would go to one home for one course, then move on to another home for the next, and so on -- we'd usually hit at least five people's places each time.

Maybe rota meals just mean that members of a group take turns being hosts -- my monthly lunch group do that in the summer -- but how then could you refer to "a" rota meal? Each one would just be, y'know, lunch. It would be the series that was a rota.


I knew some sommelierswho, upon making their own wines, would schedule an evening to trip, merrily, from member's house to member's house. Tasting the current production at each - some kind of finger food or snack was expected at each destination.

Husbands drove wives and wives drove husbands as all were expected to have a safe driver available. They were part of an oenophile association.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

justme

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« Reply #24 on: April 10, 2007, 08:39:48 AM »
Turkey is the meat of choice for all celebrations in our household (at least according to my son).  I found the coolest turkey at Sobey's - it's all ready to go, stuffed etc. and you stick it in the oven frozen!

Purrrrfect.

alisea

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« Reply #25 on: April 10, 2007, 10:05:43 AM »
Quote from: justme
Turkey is the meat of choice for all celebrations in our household (at least according to my son).  I found the coolest turkey at Sobey's - it's all ready to go, stuffed etc. and you stick it in the oven frozen!

Purrrrfect.


Sounds like it would skip a lot of hassle, but I'd be inclined to read the ingredient list verrrry carefully, to see what sorts of interesting chemicals and artificial fats they're using to achieve this ...
Do not meddle with the Forces of Nature, for you are small, insignificant, and biodegradable.

justme

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« Reply #26 on: April 10, 2007, 10:13:31 AM »
I didn't see anything too scary on the package - Oh, what the hell, it tasted great, and I didn't even have to baste it!

Croghan27

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« Reply #27 on: November 09, 2007, 03:50:44 PM »
from The SOURCE - gubberment website:

Quote
This year, the festival of Diwali is on Friday, November 9. Diwali, the festival of light, is one of the biggest Hindu festivals and is celebrated with much enthusiasm by Hindus everywhere as an occasion for jubilation and togetherness.

It’s marked by a visit to the local temple to worship the shrine of Lakshmi, a Hindu goddess. Eating special sweets, burning incense sticks, lighting the home and surroundings are some ways of celebrating this festival.

Small lamps are left on windowsills or by open doorways. The lamps, called diyas, play a large role in maintaining the spirit of the Diwali festival at home. Nowadays, most Canadian Hindus decorate their homes using colorful electric lamps for safety reasons.

The preparations for Diwali, its rituals and the entire celebration focuses on the home and branches out to bring the entire community together.

The festival of light originates in Hindu mythology. The most famous legend associated with the story of Diwali is the return of Lord Rama, one of the most popular heroes in Hinduism, to the ancient Indian city of Ayodhya after many years of exile.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

lagatta

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« Reply #28 on: November 09, 2007, 03:58:18 PM »
I was wondering why Easter/Passover, but Happy Diwali to all those who celebrate it!

And that is why the Hindu ladies going to a local temple were in especially fetching garb, despite the chilly but sunny day!
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Croghan27

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« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2007, 03:40:20 AM »
Quote from: lagatta
I was wondering why Easter/Passover


They seem to be religious celebrations that have extended over into the secular realm - and I am not all that excited about beginning new 'threads' - there dozens now.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

 

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