Author Topic: This day in history  (Read 33415 times)

Mandos

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This day in history
« Reply #105 on: January 31, 2008, 04:46:32 PM »
If I ever have kids, I'd be hard pressed, and in fact kind of embarassed, to have to explain the Iraq war to them.

skdadl

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This day in history
« Reply #106 on: January 31, 2008, 04:51:56 PM »
It was so awful as the Viet Nam war heated up, so heavy and awful. And of course assassination season had begun in the U.S. Was it that year, though, that Trudeau decided that Canada was open to U.S. war resisters?

How would you explain the invasion of Grenada to your kids, Mandos? I'm still agog and agape over that one.

deBeauxOs

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This day in history
« Reply #107 on: January 31, 2008, 08:44:37 PM »
:?  I forgot that we had this thread, and thus did not post this informationabout the 60th anniversary of Gandhi's death, yesterday.
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Across the street from the house where Mohandas K. Gandhi was shot and killed 60 years ago today stands India's National Defense College, an institution that certainly would have troubled the icon of nonviolence.

It's not the only thing that would have disturbed Gandhi about today's India, a rising economic and military power that barely paused today to mark the anniversary of his assassination.

That's not to say Gandhi has been forgotten by this country of 1.1 billion people -- he's still considered by most the moral conscience of the nation and pictures of his wizened, smiling face are everywhere, from rupee notes to murals along the highway. ...


"Gandhi is, in many ways, very inconvenient to modern India," said Pratap Bhanu Mehta, president of the Center for Policy Research, a New Delhi think tank.

Gandhi envisioned a country focused on its thousands of villages where people spun the cloth for their own clothes and artisans produced what was needed.

"I just think he set an impossible standard no country, not even India, can live up to Gandhi, to his ideals," said Tilak Menon, a 23-year-old engineering student shopping at a New Delhi market.

Croghan27

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Re: This day in history
« Reply #108 on: August 25, 2009, 06:55:45 PM »
From The Guardian:

Quote
Exactly 400 years ago today, on 25 August 1609, the Italian astronomer and philosopher Galilei Galileo showed Venetian merchants his new creation, a telescope – the instrument that was to bring him both scientific immortality and, more immediately, a whole lot of trouble.

Galileo did not invent the telescope, that happened in the Netherlands. He did not come up with the idea of a solar-centric cosmos, that was a Polish Monk. Yet he brought it all together.

Brash and argumentative, there is considerable evidence to show that his trial for being a heretic had more to do with insulting the members (some of them his friends) than with any apostasy on his part.  But by then he had achieved icon statue in Italy and European scientific circles - his 'discoveries' could not be either hidden or dismissed.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Alison

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Re: This day in history
« Reply #109 on: October 03, 2009, 05:15:21 AM »
Celebrate Gandhi's 140th birthday with this beautiful $25,000US solid gold fountain pen from Mont Blanc.
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The fountain pen in 18-carat solid gold, is engraved with Gandhi's image and tricked out with a saffron-colored mandarin garnet on the clip and a rhodium-plated nib.

Holly Stick

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Re: This day in history
« Reply #110 on: October 03, 2009, 10:03:50 PM »
That is just so wrong.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Croghan27

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Re: This day in history
« Reply #111 on: July 16, 2011, 08:42:08 AM »
IT did not all begin today in New Mexico, near Alamogordo. That honour, if such it may be, goes to Chicago and Enrico Fermi's contraption in 1942. But it was the first time humanity 'bettered' the Halifax explosion.
 
16 July saw the first explosion of a nuclear device - it was called the Trinity test and the bomb called The gadget.
 
Here is the website from the US National Labratory at Los Alomos. It explains how using several variation of bomb on mostly uninvolved cities in Japan, ended WWII. (In the same way that sub-prime morgages prevented homelessness in 2008.)
 
 
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Croghan27

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Re: This day in history
« Reply #112 on: July 17, 2011, 05:52:11 PM »
All sorts of things happened in various Julys. This, being the 17th marked the beginning of the struggle against European fascism.
 
Quote
The Spanish Civil War (The Crusade among Nationalists,
Fourth Carlist War among Carlists, The Rebellion or
Uprising among Republicans) was a major conflict fought in Spain from 17 July 1936 to 1 April
1939

Supported by both Labour and Conservative governments in Britain, the Portuguese and Italians the only international support was rather milquetoast aid from the USSR. (Stalin did not get into many conflicts outside of his own country.) He did send supplies to the Republican forces in Spain, even as the freedom loving governments in England and France prevented him from shipping them through the English Channel.
 
Canada contributed the famous Mac-Paps to the Republican side. (without government support) that, as always with Canadian in wars, distinguished themselves in several battles. As Wiki comments: Except for France, no other country gave a greater proportion of its population as volunteers in Spain than Canada.
 
Harper did not invent extra-curricular methods to support his favourite fascist, PM King had his external affairs refuse passports to anyone going to join and (as expected) the RCMP investigated them. Upon reading the entry I got a shiver of deja vu.
 
Occasionally I drop up to Parliament Hill and am amazed there is a memorial to these brave soldiers. (again) Wiki points out that:
Quote
The Canadian government continued its policy of ignoring or even persecuting the
veterans of Spain. Money had to be scratched together to get them home; some
were arrested in France. It was not until January 1939 that the government
agreed the fighters could return to Canada. Upon their return to Canada, many
were investigated by the RCMP and denied employment. Even though Canada went on
to contribute vastly to the Allied
side against fascism in World
War II
, the battalion’s contribution has never been formally recognized.
Standard histories of Canada rarely mention the Spanish Civil War. A good number
of the Mac-Pap veterans fought in the Second World War, but a number were
prohibited due to "political unreliability".
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Alison

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Re: This day in history
« Reply #113 on: July 18, 2011, 01:11:43 AM »
Some years ago a surviving Mac Pap was interviewed on CBC radio. She said even after eventual official Canadian recognition of their service, they still were not entitled to veterans benefits. Bethune was one, was he not? The problem, she said, was their being against fascism before it was fashionable to be against it

sparqui

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Re: This day in history
« Reply #114 on: July 18, 2011, 12:20:19 PM »
Bethune was definitely one of them. It took awhile for fascism to become unpopular. Lots of western nations were petrified of communism and the limited aid from the USSR was enough to make support for the Republican cause in Spain suspect. I believe Leon Blum of France tried to persuade the League of Nations to get involved in stopping Franco and spoke against the rising tide of fascism in Europe but that didn't amount to much.
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

 

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