Author Topic: This day in history  (Read 33414 times)

skdadl

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« Reply #30 on: April 26, 2007, 10:31:34 AM »
Och, there they are again! Kitty!  

I remember that shameful episode.

Quote
"There is a profound symbolism in pulling a shroud over this great work of art," she said.


Y'think?

This seems to be our day to remember the Powell family. *rrrr* Who have been getting off too easily lately. *rrrrr*

That's a further reminder to me that, whatever the USian msm were doing, many many of the rest of us were already in flames, already knew what the lies were and who was telling them.  :evil:

belva

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« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2007, 02:33:55 PM »
found these sad moments also for April 26th:

1986 - The world’s worst nuclear disaster to date occurred at Chernobyl, in the Ukraine. 31 died in the incident and thousands more were exposed to radioactive material.

1998 - Auxiliary Bishop Juan Gerardi Conedera was bludgeoned to death two days after a report he'd compiled on atrocities during Guatemala's 36-year civil war was made public.


 :cry:

belva

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« Reply #32 on: April 27, 2007, 10:57:23 AM »
interesting assortment of famous birthdays today:

April 27 Birthdays

Edward Gibbon 1737 - Historian

Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin 1759 - Author

Samuel F.B.  Morse 1791 - Inventor

Ulysses S. Grant 1822 - 18th U.S. President, Lt. General in command of all Union armies during the U.S. Civil War,

Jack Klugman 1922 - Actor

Coretta Scott King 1927 -civil rights activist

Sandy Dennis 1937 - Actor

belva

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« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2007, 05:43:01 PM »
interesting day!

May 7
1429 - The English siege of Orleans was broken by Joan of Arc.

1525 - The German peasants' revolt was crushed by the aristocracy and church.

1663 - The first Theatre Royal was opened in London.

1763 - First Nation chief Pontiac began all out war on the British in New York colony.
 
1915 - The Lusitania was sunk by a German submarine.

1937 - The German Condor Legion arrived in Spain to assist Franco’s forces.

1939 - Germany and Italy announced a military and political alliance known as the Rome-Berlin Axis.

1940 - Winston Churchill became British Prime Minister.

1945 - Baseball owner Branch Rickey announced the organization of the "United States Negro Baseball League". There were 6 teams.

1945 - Germany signed unconditional surrender ending World War II. It would take effect the next day.

1946 - Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering Corp. was founded. The company was later renamed Sony.

1954 - French forces surrendered to the Vietminh forces at Dien Bien Phu after 55 days of fighting.

1984 - A $180 million out-of-court settlement was announced in the Agent Orange class-action suit brought by Vietnam veterans who had suffered injury from exposure to the defoliant while serving in the armed forces.

'lance

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« Reply #34 on: May 07, 2007, 06:00:31 PM »
Quote from: belva
interesting day!

May 7
1429 - The English siege of Orleans was broken by Joan of Arc.


... and were her fellow-countrymen (and I do mean men, of course) grateful? Oy vey.

skdadl

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« Reply #35 on: May 07, 2007, 06:21:33 PM »
Amazing story, written so many times so well, and yet still to be written again.

lagatta

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« Reply #36 on: May 08, 2007, 12:14:31 PM »
VE Day is celebrated on the 8th of May in most places, though there is some dispute as to the actual surrender/cessation of hostilities:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/ve-day/
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

belva

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« Reply #37 on: May 08, 2007, 02:17:06 PM »
I found this lovely piece on a modern Joan of Arc:

 
Quote
'Joan of Arc' for St. Paul's working people
By Elizabeth Faue
28 March 2007 Editor's note: This article originally appeared in the Union Advocate newspaper as part of its centennial series in 1997.

In 1888, the Knights of Labor in Minneapolis and St. Paul turned their attention to the growing number of working women in the cities. Locally, they noted, working women were underpaid and overworked. They were the victims of economic conditions which forced them to work for low wages. The committee investigating the conditions reported that "It is an absolute certainty that no power will intervene between the employer and his female help to increase wages unless the working girls are able to make the demand for higher wages themselves and enforce it. This can only be done, and will be done, at the present time through organization. Organization, then, is the first duty of the hour, and this must be brought about by girls who are already organized."
 
The same month that the report was published, Eva McDonald, the daughter of a workingman and a member of the Knights, began to publish a series of stories on working women in the St. Paul Globe. Her first story, "Among Girls Who Toil," covered the horrible conditions of women working in a Minneapolis garment factory. Within two weeks, its women workers went on strike after the firm cut their wages. Eva McDonald was among those leading and reporting on the strike. The coming together of Knights and workingwomen gave support to the first women's strike in the Twin Cities. It also gave a tremendous start to the career of journalist and labor activist Eva McDonald Valesh.
Eva McDonald was born in Maine in 1866 of John and Elinor Lane McDonald, Canadian immigrants of Scotch-Irish descent. At the age of 12, McDonald moved with her parents to the Twin Cities. After high school, she took some teacher training courses. Turned down for a teaching position because she was "too young," McDonald trained as a typesetter. Soon after, she took the job as a journalist for the Globe. Her series on working women was followed by articles on organized labor. From 1891 to 1896, she worked as a political reporter and labor editor for the Minneapolis Tribune.

Throughout this period, Eva McDonald was mentored in public speaking and political economy by local labor radicals and populists, including John McGaughey, master workman of the Knights' district assembly; Timothy Brosnan, his successor; and Ignatius Donnelly, a politician turned populist. With their support, McDonald traveled across Minnesota and the country as a public speaker for labor and populist causes. She ran for the local school board in 1888. She became a state lecturer for the Minnesota Farmers' Alliance, and later served as a national delegate to labor conventions. McDonald also published work on labor and political economy in national journals, such as the Journal of United Labor, National Economist, Railway Times and the American Federationist, the monthly publication of the American Federation of Labor.

These writings gave her a national reputation. Annie Diggs, the populist writer, saw McDonald as a "comet" streaking across the skies of American reform politics. Kate Donnelly, who thought her husband was overshadowed by the younger woman, described her as "a vicious pest." Still others saw McDonald as a "Joan of Arc" for the laboring classes, a woman who would help lead workingmen and women to fight for a better life.

In 1891, Eva McDonald married another rising star in Minnesota labor politics, cigarmaker and trade unionist Frank Valesh. Frank Valesh was a Czech immigrant, who came to the states when he was 14. Well-read in labor thought, Frank Valesh had become in his twenties a protege of Samuel Gompers, the new head of the American Federation of Labor. He and Eva McDonald were among the co-founders of the Minnesota Federation of Labor in 1890.

Their marriage was a marriage of equals. And their collaboration in state labor politics led to the appointment of Frank as assistant commissioner of labor and an officer in the state federation; it also aided Eva's career in journalism. The two went on a tour of Europe in 1896. Their labor credentials, and the patronage of Samuel Gompers, opened doors to European trade union leaders. Eva McDonald's reports were published serially in the American Federationist. The couple seemed on their way to success.

Part of the reason for the European trip, however, was Frank Valesh's fragile health, as he began to show the first signs of tuberculosis, which led to his death in 1916. Frank's illness seemed to get better through the European trip. After his return, however, Frank retired from labor circles to the town of Graceville, Minn., where he opened a cigar factory. Frank and Eva separated and Eva assumed custody of their only child, Frank Morgan Valesh. They divorced in 1906.

After her separation from Frank, Eva McDonald Valesh pursued a career in journalism in New York (where she worked for William Randolph Hearst's New York American) and in Washington, D.C. She eventually accepted a position as assistant editor of the American Federationist. She served as Gompers' office assistant, handling journal business and writing articles on child labor, citizenship, and working women; she also worked as an organizer and public speaker. In 1910, Valesh left the AFL. The reasons aren't entirely clear, but in later years she told an interviewer that she felt unappreciated and that Gompers had refused to acknowledge the importance of her work. She went on to edit a magazine for a women's club involved in reform activities and later became a proofreader for the New York Times. She worked at the Times for 25 years, retiring shortly before her death in 1956 at age 90.

Over the course of her career, Eva McDonald Valesh was witness to many changes in the labor movement. She began as a labor radical in the Knights of Labor. She later adopted the values of "bread and butter unionism" when she worked with the Samuel Gompers in the American Federation of Labor. She was a woman pioneer in labor organizing and in the promotion of women's labor activism. Throughout her career, Eva Valesh wrote sensitively of the plight of women workers. She was a popular speaker on the subject. In her lectures, she sought first to convince working women to organize. Valesh wrote, "The American Federation of Labor is the body best fitted to investigate women's work and apply the proper remedy for existing abuses."

During much of her career, Eva McDonald Valesh celebrated the potential of the labor movement for "ethical influence" and the strength of its "bonds of brotherhood," even as she understood labor did not always live up to its promise of equality for women workers. In these sentiments and others, Eva McDonald Valesh was representative of the labor values of her age.

Elizabeth Faue is an associate professor of labor history at Wayne State University in Detroit. She is the author of "Community of Suffering and Struggle: Women, Men and the Labor Movement in Minneapolis, 1915-1945" and a biography of Eva McDonald Valesh, “Writing the Wrongs: Eva Valesh and the Rise of Labor Journalism.”
 

belva

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« Reply #38 on: May 16, 2007, 09:30:54 PM »
I know that this is a bit early but it's important to me. Saturday, May 19th, marks the 90th anniversary of the death of Belva Ann Bennet McNall Lockwood, whose first name I dare to use as my nom d'plume here.  The following gives you some idea as to why I honor her & feel privileged to use her name & to follow in her footsteps in my chosen profession.



Quote
Name: Belva Lockwood
Birth Date: October 24, 1830
Death Date: May 19, 1917
Place of Birth: Royalton, New York, United States of America
Place of Death: Washington, DC, United States of America
Nationality: United States
Gender: Female
Occupations: attorney, activist, reformer



Encyclopedia of World Biography on Belva Lockwood

Belva Lockwood (1830-1917) was the first American female attorney to be admitted to practice in the U. S. Supreme Court and the first woman to run for president of the United States. She refused to accept discriminatory laws and asserted her right as a woman to plead cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. Lockwood waged a lifelong battle to attain equal rights for women, Native Americans, African Americans, and immigrants.

Belva Lockwood was born Belva Ann Bennet on October 24, 1830 in Royalton, New York. She was the daughter of farmers, Lewis and Hannah Bennet, and was raised in the hills of western New York. As a child, she loved history and dreamed of becoming a teacher. At the age of 14, Lockwood graduated from the local public school and spent the summer teaching for $7 a week. She saved her money and used it to pay tuition at the Girls Academy in Royalton, New York. She graduated at 18 and married Uriah McNall. The couple had one child, a daughter named Lura.

Lockwood was 22 when McNall died. In order to support herself and her young daughter, she applied for a teaching position. When Lockwood discovered that she could earn only $8 a week while male teachers earned $16 to $20 a week for the same work, she refused to accept the discriminatory wage. She sold some of her late husband's property and used the proceeds to pay her tuition at Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, later called Syracuse University. Lura McNall went to live with her grandparents while Lockwood pursued a higher education. She studied science, mathematics, political economy, and the U.S. Constitution. She learned about the social causes of the day, including abolitionism, temperance, and equal rights for women. Lockwood graduated from the two-year program in 1857 and became head of the Lockport Union School District, where her progressive ideas shocked the other teachers and parents. She insisted, for example, that girls be allowed to enroll in public speaking and physical education classes. After two years at the school district, she became head mistress at the Gainesville Female Seminary.

Resolute in her conviction to change the course of women's lives, Lockwood moved herself, her daughter, and her sister, Inverno, to Washington, D.C. in 1865. They established a school for young ladies as a means of support, and McNall involved herself in the administration of the school. Lockwood spent a portion of her time speaking out for women's rights and contacting legislators. She wrote letters to congressmen, observed the workings of the Congress, and attended meetings for social activism. Yet she felt increasingly abandoned by the elected officials in the federal government. It seemed to her that many had forgotten the words of the U.S. Constitution. She became outraged by the fact that female civil service employees made two to three times less than their male counterparts and drafted a bill to equalize the salaries of all civil service employees. The bill passed and became law. In order to further test the power of the courts, Lockwood decided to become a lawyer. She was refused admission at two law schools because off her sex. Finally she met William Wedgewood, vice chancellor of the National University Law School, who agreed to give her private instruction in law.

Legal Career

In May 1873, at the age of 43, Lockwood completed her law studies, but was refused a diploma. She wrote to President Ulysses S. Grant, the titular head of the law school, and demanded her diploma. It arrived within a week. In September of that same year, she was admitted to the bar of the District of Columbia. She opened a law practice in her home and quickly established a clientele. Lura McNall assisted her mother by performing secretarial duties.

Lockwood discovered while working on a case of patent infringement, that women were not allowed to plead cases before the U.S. Court of Claims, without special permission. She requested permission, but was refused. She then petitioned Congress to grant women permission to practice before the Supreme Court. Congress passed the appropriate legislation five years later, in 1879.

On March 3 of that year, Lockwood was granted permission to argue cases before the highest court in the United States. Three days later she was granted access to the U.S. Court of Claims, where she won some of her more memorable cases.
Among the significant litigation that Lockwood presented before the Court of Claims was a suit brought by Jim Taylor, a Native American from the Cherokee tribe. Taylor requested help to collect money owed to the Cherokee people by the U.S. government since the Treaty of New Echota of 1835. Lockwood fought for many years to help them collect the interest on that money. She pleaded the case before the U.S. Supreme Court and won an award of $5 million. At the time, It was considered to be the most important case, in terms of monetary compensation, ever brought before the U.S. Court of Claims and the Supreme Court.

Lockwood worked with the Universal Peace Union, in a struggle to attain equal rights for minorities. She contributed her talents to the cause of southerner, Samuel Lowery, who became the first African American to be admitted before the bar of the Supreme Court.

Presidential Candidate and Diplomat

Lockwood was continually frustrated by the Republican Party and its apparent lack of interest in protecting the rights of women. She wrote to Marietta Stow, the editor of the Women's Herald of Industry in California. Lockwood stated, "Even if women in the United States are not permitted to vote, there is no law against their being voted for and, if elected, filling the highest office...Why not nominate women for important places"...The Republican Party ... has little but insult for women when they appear before its conventions. It is time we had our own party, our own platform and our own nominees." Stow replied to Lockwood's letter with a startling proposition, "We have the honor to congratulate you [Lockwood] as the first woman ever nominated for the office of president of the United States." The Equal Rights Party had selected her as a presidential nominee to run in the election of 1884. The party awaited her reply.

Lockwood accepted the nomination and formulated her platform. She would seek to place women in public offices including the Supreme Court. Lockwood resolved to protect and foster American industries, to promote temperance laws, and to fight for full citizenship rights for Native Americans. Reporters and cartoonists poked fun at her while the most ardent of feminists, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Stanton, disapproved of Lockwood's presidential campaign, fearing that such a hapless endeavor might only serve to dilute the cause of women's rights. Lockwood herself took the campaign seriously; she visited many cities and states on a grueling campaign schedule. Her ideas reached many citizens through the newspapers.

Lockwood received at least 6,161 votes. There were more votes in her favor that the election judges refused to tabulate. In 1888, the Equal Rights Party of Iowa nominated her for the presidency once more, and again she campaigned in earnest.

During the 1880s and 1890s Lockwood realized a lifelong dream of traveling abroad. In 1885, the State Department appointed her as a delegate to the Congress of Charities, the first world pacifist gathering, in Geneva, Switzerland. At the Congress Lockwood read a proposal for the formation of a world court, a suggestion that met with great approval. The following year, she became the official representative to the Second International Peace Conference in Budapest, Hungary. In 1889, Lockwood attended the Universal Peace Congress in Paris, and the following year she read a paper on disarmament at the International Peace Conference in London. In 1892, Lockwood was a member of the International Peace Bureau, which met in Bern, Switzerland.

Personal Glimpse

Shortly after arriving in Washington, a toothache led to an acquaintance with Dr. Ezekiel Lockwood. She married the dentist in 1868 and gave birth to a daughter the following year. The couple named the little girl Jessie. Sadly, the child died of typhoid fever at a young age. When Lockwood opened her private law practice in the couple's home, her husband retired from dentistry to become a notary public and claims agent. He died in 1877. Lockwood's oldest daughter, Lura McNall, died during the years when Lockwood's life was absorbed by the North Carolina Cherokee claim recovery case. McNall left behind a young son, Forest, whom Lockwood continued to raise.

Lockwood assisted in the establishment of the Universal Franchise Association, and served as president to that organization. In 1869, she helped found the Equal Rights Association of Washington, an organization whose mission was to secure equal rights for all Americans regardless of race, color, or sex. Lockwood was often frustrated when hecklers disrupted the association meetings. Her words at one meeting were quoted in the Washington Star: "We cannot stop fighting until such legislation is passed, no matter what ridicule and humiliation we suffer doing so."

In 1912, at the age of 81, Lockwood retired from the practice of law, to devote her time to social causes. Three years later she made her last trip to Europe, to send a message of peace to the women of the world. Lockwood died on May 19, 1917 in Washington, D.C.--three years before American women received the right to vote. In the 1980s, the U.S. Postal Service issued stamps to honor Lockwood.


at happy hour this week, I'll be buying a round in her honor!

Thank you, Ms Lockwood, for your inspiration!

Croghan27

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« Reply #39 on: May 17, 2007, 02:45:29 PM »
Just reading back on threats/posts I may have missed.

About Gurnica
Quote
turned a corner, and walked right into it. Reproductions cannot convey the raw power of that raw original


In the National Gallery of Canada you walk into a room, just like many other rooms with paintings hanging, then, at the far end is van Gogh's Iris. I feel sorry for some of the other very good artists hung in that room -  it is impossibe to divert your attention away from it.

As with Dali's Santiago El Grande in the Beaverbrook in Fredericton. Both are breath taking.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Holly Stick

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« Reply #40 on: May 30, 2007, 10:30:01 PM »
More on Guernica; Brett Holman, a PhD student studying airpower and Britain has made four posts about the bombing of Guernica.  

Guernica  I: http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/38115.html


Guernica  II: http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/38414.html


Guernica  III: http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/38884.html


Guernica  IV: http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/39394.html

Some BnR people might be especially interested in the fourth one, where he asks why the painting affects many people more powerfully than photos of Guernica after the bombing. The comment there is worth reading, too.

These are from "Revise and Dissent", another good group blog at HNN.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Croghan27

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« Reply #41 on: May 31, 2007, 03:36:12 PM »
Belva:

On rereading this thread, I see I may have hopped in with the painting reference and it seemed I ignored your two excellents posts, one on your name sake, Belva , and the other about Eva McDonald -  they both were read closely and appreciated them.    :oops:
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

belva

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« Reply #42 on: June 01, 2007, 03:59:46 PM »
Quote from: Croghan27
seemed I ignored your two excellents posts, one on your name sake, Belva , and the other about Eva McDonald -  they both were read closely and appreciated them.    :oops:


no need to blush, dear! glad you liked 'em! :D   you see now why I love to use that wonderful woman's name!

Croghan27

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« Reply #43 on: June 03, 2007, 10:54:17 AM »
Hey    Today is Buddha's birthday  :D  Serious parade action happ'in out side my window. All sorts of banners saying: "Happy Birthday, Buddha."

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Drummers drumming
And the archer split the tree.
There was a fanfare blowing
To the sun
That was floating on the breeze.


No archers apparent, but great drumming and lotsa happy people ....   :weddingcake:  :congrats:  :flowers  :party3
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

skdadl

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« Reply #44 on: June 03, 2007, 12:11:58 PM »
Happy Birthday, Buddha.  

I can get into that.  :toast

(Is alcohol cool for Buddhists? I should know that, but I don't.)

 

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