Author Topic: Comfort food  (Read 46656 times)

skdadl

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Comfort food
« on: May 29, 2007, 03:22:58 PM »
You knew the English were crazy, didn't you?

I guess a comfort-food thread is not very summery. We tend to think of utter stodge like this more in the cold months. The English will eat it any time, though.   :wink:

deBeauxOs

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Comfort food
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2007, 03:49:17 PM »
Ahem.  A friend just left for 2 weeks in England and at the request of her hostesses, brought them some Canadian junk food not available in the UK.  Cheet-os anyone?  :shock:

skdadl

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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2007, 06:47:09 PM »
But of course. If they can find even worse junk than they produce nationally, they will go for it.   :wink:

lagatta

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« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2007, 06:59:20 PM »
I read through the original thread, and some surprisingly real food got through. Steelcut oats with buttermilk as junque? (I'm always looking for savoury, not sweet, things to do with porridge).

But one fellow was channelling Elvis with his every component fried in abundant butter. Obviously not a thrifty Celt, that one.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2007, 07:01:54 PM »
Oh, frying in butter is the conservative option. Real Brits fry bread in bacon or pork drippings.   :piratedance

Holly Stick

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« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2007, 07:36:39 PM »
I like the recommendation to turn the toaster on its side, presumably in lieu of a toaster oven.  Wouldn't your toasted cheese and beans be thrown out of the toaster when it popped?
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

lagatta

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« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2007, 09:06:22 PM »
I have one of those single-wide-slot toasters (paid $3 for it at the Japanese Cultural Centre bazaar - which alas I missed this year due to work) with metal braces that adjust to whatever is in there (toast, bagel, whatever) so using them for a cheese on toast would be a disaster...

I do that kind of stuff in a dry cast-iron skillet, just as tortillas etc are traditionally made.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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Comfort food
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2007, 07:38:58 PM »
I am savouring and eating red cabbage that I slow-cooked in water and apple juice.  Towards the end, when it was tender and all liquids had evavorated, I added a touch of sesame oil, a splash of balsamic vinegar and a teaspoonl of Patak's Madras curry, from a jar.

lagatta

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« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2007, 07:48:11 PM »
Oh yum.

South and East Asian touches to classic Mitteleuropäisch comfort food.

In Amsterdam, where I couldn't really cook, I found some jarred red cabbage that had indeed been cooked with apple juice, rather than adding sugar. Though like anything healthier, it was twice as much as at the supermarket. Made no great difference to me, but would be an obstacle in real life, or to a family.

It is also good with a more traditional prep, adding perhaps mild sweet onion, or fruit (apples, pears etc) and caraway seeds.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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Comfort food
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2007, 07:54:53 PM »
lagatta, I was thinking that this would be a delicious main or side dish, with toasted sliced or slivered almonds, as well as caramelized onions and chopped, tart (uncooked) apple added as a garnish.

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« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2007, 04:24:06 PM »
b4 i go offline, i want to share with u one of my favourite vegetarian meals as a child.

avial.

the vegetables used in it can vary. you might even be able 2 find simpler recipes if u google avial. i can't say i recall ever seeing ash gourd in canada although the mexican store at the farmer's market may carry it certain times in the year. it is the only place i know that sells snake gourd which i much prefer to the ash gourd.

a lot of foods i used to dislike as a child have become comfort foods for me only because they are rare here and biting into them when i find/cook thm brings back memories of the smells of india. the only exception is vegtable korma as my mum made that almost every day!

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2007, 10:33:38 AM »
Made up a nice pork roast yesterday to herald in the fall (it's not really fall until I've roasted something).  Dominion had a nice tenderloin/rib roast on sale ($4 for a pork roast!).  Mashed and mixed veg on the side, as well as some mushroom barley, and a savoury applesauce I made from a caramelized shallot, an apple, some juniper berries, and a splash of  lemon juice.  It was kind of fun to be back into fall cooking.  I always find I miss it.
ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,

lagatta

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« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2007, 10:51:45 AM »
On Saturday, it was so cold that I either had to turn on the oven or the heat, and I refuse to heat before November. Just roasted some grain-fed chicken legs (think the butcher does fancy stuff, also for restaurants, with the white meat), just simply with some lemon and herbs, but also did a lot of roasted veg; an organic acorn squash cut into eights and adorned with garlic butter, sweet potato, also organic, as were my potatoes, cut into wedges and roasted with olive oil and a bit of soya sauce and Vietnamese ground hot peppers - and of course the potatoes, little Yukon Golds, which I cooked whole and am eating with the skins. With some dark-green veg, pretty much have food for the week, and I don't get tired of those things.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

justme

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« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2007, 11:50:02 AM »
So friggin' cold out - had to go to the bank at lunch, so I popped into a little bakery near by and picked up a bowl of ginger-carrot soup.  Oh, so good, and warming me right up - the ginger really gets the blood moving again!

skdadl

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« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2007, 02:41:51 PM »
Plagiarizing from self (and before that, from self on babble), but this was on an old thread -- a wonderful fall spicy carrot soup, although no ginger:

Carrot Mulligatawny Soup


1 tbsp oil or clarified butter
1 large onion, chopped (oh, go ahead: add more)
1 clove garlic, minced (ditto)
2 tsp each: ground cumin, ground coriander
1 tsp turmeric
1/2 tsp cayenne (or more)
1 lb carrots, sliced
4 cups stock (beef, chicken, or veggie)
1/4 cup light cream (optional)
chopped fresh parsley or coriander


In large heavy saucepan, heat oil; saute onion and garlic until transparent. Push onion-garlic mixture to one side and add cumin, coriander, turmeric, and cayenne to other side. Increase heat slightly and stir-fry spices for 2 to 3 minutes or until fragrant.

Stir in carrots until coated with spice mixture. Pour in stock and mix well; simmer, covered, over low heat until carrots are tender, about 40 minutes. Transfer mixture to blender or food processor and puree.

Return puree to saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower heat and stir in cream: DO NOT BOIL.

Ladle into warm bowls and garnish. Serves 6.

*NB: If you are not thickening with cream at the end, you might want either to increase the number of carrots -- and maybe onions -- that you use or to cut back on the stock.

 

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