Author Topic: Comfort food  (Read 45440 times)

skdadl

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Comfort food
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2007, 06:45:20 AM »
Oh. Gosh. That story could put me right off rum.  :shock:

Boom Boom

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« Reply #31 on: October 16, 2007, 02:33:06 PM »
I still have a quart basket of potatoes from the garden, and just pulled more carrots - in mid-October. Amazing. All week I'm having a roast of beef with veggies from my garden. The turips are finished, though.

Croghan27

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« Reply #32 on: October 16, 2007, 04:57:53 PM »
Quote from: skdadl
Oh. Gosh. That story could put me right off rum.  :shock:

GEEZE - what with no rum - and stay away from a butt of malmsy ; perhaps meed, extended sobriety is in your future.  :shock:

Quote
Second Murderer
Look behind you, my lord.

First Murderer
Take that, and that: if all this will not do,

Stabs him

I'll drown you in the malmsey-butt within.

Exit, with the body

snip

First Murderer
So do not I: go, coward as thou art.
Now must I hide his body in some hole,
Until the duke take order for his burial:
And when I have my meed, I must away;
For this will out, and here I must not stay.


From Richard III, scene IV: He was arguable the best King England had for 200 years and horribly diss'ed by Shakespear.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #33 on: October 16, 2007, 05:05:19 PM »
We tried some mead once, when we saw it for sale at the LCBO.  Honey wine!  Wine made from honey!  How could that not be amazing?

Well, it tasted like Chateau CellblockB.  Gah!
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Croghan27

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« Reply #34 on: October 16, 2007, 05:09:32 PM »
Quote from: Herr Magoo
We tried some mead once, when we saw it for sale at the LCBO.  Honey wine!  Wine made from honey!  How could that not be amazing?

Well, it tasted like Chateau CellblockB.  Gah!


Meed, of course, is drunk riding to the hounds .... first you get the large mug, then trot your horse up to the groom at the fire. He takes a hot poker and sticks it in the mug to heat the meed.

After that, you have to drink it quickly as the alcohol wll evaporate at a lower temperature than the water.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

lagatta

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« Reply #35 on: October 16, 2007, 05:21:22 PM »
There is some decent artisanal mead made in Québec - remember, growing grapes here is a not-very-rewarding labour of love, so cider has always been a tradition - (gosh, when it was legalised in the 1970s, did we ever get the headache-causing stuff). But I find even the drier meads too sweet - they are not balanced with pleasant acidity the way the somewhat-sweet Germanic wine cépages are.

One thing I love and regret being unable to find here is perry (poiré) - the pear equivalent of cider. It is a lovely, subtle drink.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #36 on: October 16, 2007, 10:19:08 PM »
For dinner I had turkey enchilada - 3 small ones, made with soft organic corn tortilla.  I had a bit of thick plain yogurt left; I mixed some chopped cilantro into that, and spooned it over the baked enchiladas.  I used some cooked turkey meat from two packages of turkey wing drumsticks that I simmered for soup.  After Thanksgiving, there are deals to be found on turkey thighs and other bits less favoured by people.  The turkey leg drumsticks are good for broth only, imho - too full of ligament and sharp, thin shards that are not bone but something else.

lagatta

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« Reply #37 on: October 17, 2007, 07:55:13 AM »
You can actually eat the turkey drumstick meat, but you have to braise it or poach it slowly (keeping it up for soup). One can retrieve the drumstick meat before it is overcooked, taking it apart and removing the ligaments and fine shin bones, or whatever they are. Resulting in a lot of little bits. Not really useful as such, but very tasty in pies, turkey pâté chinois, empanadas, enchiladas etc. Then throw the bones and ligaments back in the pot and keep the soup boiling.

This sounds like more work than it is.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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« Reply #38 on: October 17, 2007, 08:14:51 AM »
I bought a lovely Savoy cabbage yesterday. I hardly ever think to buy cabbage, but I love the stuff. Just made a lazy salad with it last night, but there is lots left, so I must find ideas.

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #39 on: October 17, 2007, 08:52:07 AM »
A savoy is the traditional choice for making cabbage rolls.  Got any rice?  Some tomato sauce?  Time?

My cabbage rolls are never going to put Eastern Europe out of business or anything, but I do have one great tip:  some saurkraut in the sauce.  In fact, a layer of it on the bottom of your saucepan or casserole dish is about right, and then put the first layer of rolls on that, so it doesn't get stuck to the bottom.
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brebis noire

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« Reply #40 on: October 17, 2007, 08:52:29 AM »
I just harvested the four last cabbages from the garden - first frost overnight, so I was a bit late, though only the first covering leaves had frozen, the rest is OK.

But now - what to do with four cabbages?  :? I'm not crazy about making cabbage dishes and don't really like coleslaw, so it'll have to be soup.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #41 on: October 17, 2007, 09:14:37 AM »
I love boiled cabbage with my roast beef. Really has to be drained quite well or you get water on the plate. It's delicious with a bit of gravy.

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #42 on: October 17, 2007, 09:39:03 AM »
If you have some surplus cabbages, look up a recipe for saurkraut... or its Korean cousin, kimchi.   I think you mostly need a crockery container and some salt.
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brebis noire

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deBeauxOs

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« Reply #44 on: October 17, 2007, 12:22:22 PM »
You could do a lazy person's version of cabbage rolls.  In an oiled lasagna baking dish, layer the following: cooked organic brown rice, raw ground meat - could be a mixture of turkey, beef, chicken or just one of them - mixed with an egg or two and your favourite seasonings, including minced garlic & thin onion slices, then coarsely shredded cabbage and top with a medium thick tomato sauce.  Cover and bake for an hour at 375F, uncover to check if cabbage is tender and dish not too wet; if so, cook a bit longer without a lid (or foil).

 

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