Author Topic: What should I make for supper tonight?  (Read 76405 times)

Herr Magoo

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What should I make for supper tonight?
« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2006, 12:57:34 PM »
Hey!  Skdadl!  Good to see you!

Anyway, yes, tamari is a form of Japanese soy sauce.  It's sort of an "older" style recipe, a little stronger than shoyu.  There's also a "light" soy sauce from Japan (not the low-salt type of "light", but lighter in colour and — and this is an important consideration in Japanese cooking — less likely to "stain" foods).

I've recently discovered the Korean markets north of me.  They also feature two types of soy sauce: one for most cooking and one specifically to be added to soups.

Chinese cooking features at least two soy sauces, both readily available.  Light is used for everyday stuff, and dark is used mostly in sauces, where it imparts a red colour (!) to things.  If you see a Chinese recipe that involves "red braised" anything, it'll call for lots of dark soy (which is thicker, inkier and sweeter).

And Indonesian soy sauce — Ketjap Manis — is halfway to molasses.

And then of course there's "solid soy sauce" — miso!  Let's talk about miso some time.
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faith

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« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2006, 01:01:21 PM »
This thread will lure the epicures among us - hi Magoo.
just picture it

shaolin

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« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2006, 01:04:35 PM »
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And then of course there's "solid soy sauce" — miso! Let's talk about miso some time.


I love miso!!! *growling belly*

fern hill

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What should I make for supper tonight?
« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2006, 01:06:30 PM »
Magoo's German cousin appears. (Note to self: owe self one nickel for betting on Monsieur Magoo.) :D

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2006, 01:09:40 PM »
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I love miso!!!

Then you NEED to get yourself some Korean miso.  It's like regular "chunky" miso, but with zing.  Also, it comes in pails — with handles!

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Magoo's German cousin appears.


I'm aiming for an entire Magoo-based United Nations.  :)
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faith

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« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2006, 01:12:13 PM »
Thread drift-
this reminds me of the several Higgins incarnations on the Magnum tv series, is there a south Texan Magoo?
just picture it

shaolin

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« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2006, 01:15:22 PM »
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Then you NEED to get yourself some Korean miso. It's like regular "chunky" miso, but with zing. Also, it comes in pails — with handles!


Pails?  Like, for restaurants - right?  It takes me months to go through a wee chunk of miso in the house.

Does Korean miso go by any other name?  Edinburgh isn't really big enough, or diverse enough, to have specific Korean food shops.  There are several 'oriental' or Chinese grocers that sell a bit of everything, but nothing specifically Korean.

Any good recipes for the Korean miso?  Meatless for me, please!

lagatta

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« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2006, 01:42:40 PM »
I bought some lovely red miso in a tub at the Japanese cultural centre bazaar a few weeks ago. Also some big plastic bottles (like those litre spring-water bottles) of Mirin - although that is a bit sweet, I like just a bit in a hot wok, burning the alcohol off on the vegetables - wonder why that makes them taste so good - guess it sears them a bit more.

At the centre, they were explaining that there were several regional varieties of miso...

In Amsterdam, with so many Indonesian people from the former colony, it is hard to find anything but ketchap manis - far too sweet for my tastes!
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skdadl

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What should I make for supper tonight?
« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2006, 02:21:37 PM »
Gaaaah! There's a MAN here!   :lol:

Wilkommen, Herr Magoo. Oh, dear. I just snurfled my lime water.  :D

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #24 on: May 30, 2006, 04:11:38 PM »
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Pails? Like, for restaurants - right?

Nope.  But not quite as big, either.  About a half gallon, and it's for home use.  Korean cooks must like buying in bulk, because chili pepper flakes come in 5 pound sacks, soy sauce in what looks like a small jerry can, etc.

The miso just says "Fermented Bean Paste" on it (in addition to all kinds of things in Korean, of course :))

Recipes?  I've only had mine for two weeks, and all I've done is marinate a roast with it.  But in honour of the soupy heat, we're having Big Salad for dinner tonight, so I'll most certainly be adding about a quarter cup of it to a finely grated clove of garlic, some rice wine vinegar, a bit of oil, and maybe a pinch of sugar for the dressing.

Speaking of vinegar, I'm guessing everyone's got some rice wine vinegar in their pantry?  Sweet and mild, with a nice pleasant but subdued zing?  Well, Korean stores stock the opposite:  extra strength vinegar.  Whereas your white vinegar is about 5% acetic acid, and pickling vinegar is about 7-8%, this stuff is 20%.  It smells like a punch in the nose, but it's awesome for those times when you want something (eg: potato salad) to be vinegary, but not watery.

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Also some big plastic bottles (like those litre spring-water bottles) of Mirin - although that is a bit sweet, I like just a bit in a hot wok, burning the alcohol off on the vegetables - wonder why that makes them taste so good - guess it sears them a bit more.

Mirin is so incredibly "go-to".  I add it to all kinds of things (thanks, BTW, for reminding me to put a little in my salad dressing!).

For those unfamiliar, mirin is a sweetened rice wine (which, when added to shoyu and sake makes up teriyaki glaze).  As Lagatta says, it's very sweet, and is only drank as wine on one day of the year.  Other than that, it's cooking wine.  It's amazing any time you want to sweeten, or really just balance something just the tiniest bit (eg: a soup).

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At the centre, they were explaining that there were several regional varieties of miso


Indeed.  There's a guy and his wife at St. Lawrence Market that sell all kinds of soy products, including homemade miso.  I would suspect that in Japan there are all kinds of varieties to choose from, some of them probably somewhat "artisanal" (small batches, old-style production, premium ingredients, etc.)

The big differentiator with miso is what grain was added to the soybeans.  Shiro (yellow) miso has wheat or rice, Aka (red) usually has barley or millet, and Hatcha (black) is pure soybean and can be smoked or aged.

I prefer Aka to Shiro (the two you'll find at Dominion), and the Korean miso is most similar to Aka as well.  My first time buying miso was at Essence of Life Organics in Kensington Market, and I bought a little tub of bulk Aka and it sat in the bottom of my fridge for over a year before I finally decided what to do with it.  No worries; it keeps well.  I love to rub it on anything I'm going to grill, and of course I lovelovelove miso soup.  Didn't I do miso soup for a Sizzle?  I think I remember talking about miso.  :)
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Debra

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What should I make for supper tonight?
« Reply #25 on: May 30, 2006, 04:50:21 PM »
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Whereas your white vinegar is about 5% acetic acid, and pickling vinegar is about 7-8%, this stuff is 20%.


For chef's who are also gardeners that 20% strength vinegar is an ideal organic weed killer.
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fern hill

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What should I make for supper tonight?
« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2006, 04:53:37 PM »
Some may recall that my sweetie has had some heart health surprises recently. He really didn't want to go on Lipitor (a cholesterol-lowering drug, with some potentially nasty side-effects), so he changed his diet pretty radically.

When we're together, we eat healthy. But we don't live together. And there's nothing wrong (that I know of) with my heart.

So, I have private, guilty fat-fests. I make the second-best Buffalo wings on earth (second only to their inventor, Mrs. Bellissimo of the Anchor Bar in Buffalo), but sweetie can't eat them any more. I also do a terrific liver-bacon-and-onions. Nix on that too.

Tonight I'm having what I call the kid's nightmare dinner: liver and spinach. Yum.

fern hill

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What should I make for supper tonight?
« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2006, 03:25:58 PM »
Today seems to be my day for resuscitating old threads. As I said in that last post, sweetie has radically changed his diet. But he's getting sick of fish and chicken, he just said. Any ideas for tasty, low-fat meals?

deBeauxOs

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What should I make for supper tonight?
« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2006, 04:05:02 PM »
A wide assortment of seasonal veggies tossed in a bit of olive oil and slowly roasted in the oven, served over hot pasta or rice - if carbs are allowed.

Sprinkle with fresh herbs, crushed garlic, salt, pepper or hot sauce in the last 20 minutes or so.

Herr Magoo

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« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2006, 05:25:55 PM »
Consider some game, like venison or pheasant.  Or ostrich.  All are notoriously low fat, so much so that you usually need to baste or bard them, so you can "add back" as much fat as you wish, or none at all.  Just be sure to keep it moist.
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