Author Topic: Folk music  (Read 8410 times)

skdadl

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« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2007, 12:56:55 PM »
If you have labour politics in your background, you're still always thinking of how we could organize.

It is unfortunately not so obvious these days how North Americans can organize, although many people in many other places obviously could.

Some labour thinking is now at least a century old, and some labour history is not all that progressive. It is possible that it will take a major economic crisis for most people to recognize what has been done to them.

Caissa

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« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2007, 01:06:16 PM »
My strangest picket line experience was when I began doctoral work at Western in 1987. I had just come from being the president of the TA union at Carleton (then CUPE 2323). When I arrvied at Western ( a very conservative place unbeknownst to me) the food services and maintenance staff were on strike. Coming from a union culture (my father had also been a president of a union local) I wanted to show solidarity. I did so by walking the line with them every morning from 7:30-9:00 a.m. (Even had my life threatened on the picket line by an irate motorist on the way to a hospital appointment. Of course, the police didn't care nor really investigate.) My picketline walking was considered abberant to say the least. Met some interesting people on the line many of them first generation Canadians from Southern Europe.

fern hill

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« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2007, 01:09:16 PM »
I read somewhere that Springsteen volunteered at a food bank and had for years, quietly. He was mightily pissed off when it was made public. I admired that.

I crossed a picket line once. At the Toronto Zoo. A friend with small child and I had cadged a ride from a car-owning friend and it had been planned for quite a while and we couldn't disappoint the kid. But we did stop and talk to the picketers and explained/apologized. It was cool with them. But we felt shitty.

Croghan27

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« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2007, 01:17:34 PM »
I did not mean to disparage Springsteen all that much - just that it took some of the sheen off his star.

His rational was that people had anticipated and paid for his concert and it would be ripping them to not show up - it does not cut it with me all that well - but it has some principled points.

The last walkout I was involved in had my immediate boss as the stewart. (Now the Chief Stewart of what is called 'the table'!). As boss they parted the lines (supervision is allowed in) for him, he would check on the plant and then come back and march on the line.  :shock:
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

arborman

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« Reply #19 on: July 17, 2007, 01:23:09 PM »
Quote from: Boom Boom
There's modern folk music, you just have to go looking for it.


I have, high and low.  Don't get me wrong, I love the classic stuff, and there are some new groups that have some really excellent stuff (The Fugitives, Mike Bearne, Truckers Memorial, Po' Girl, Bitch, Xavier Rudd, to name a few).  

I'm just looking for folk music that reflects the lived experience of the current folk. So much of it is either rural-oriented or ignores the class issue altogether and sings about love and all that good stuff.  That's fine, but there is a hole there, and I am hoping someone with musical talent finds a way to fill it.

What I want to see is Dilbert put to music, I guess.

If anyone has any suggestions by all means, bring it on.  I need an anthem I guess.
The pleasures of the table are for every man, of every land, and no matter what place in history or society; they can be a part of all his other pleasures, and they last the longest, to console him when he has outlived the rest.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2007, 01:24:13 PM »
Quote from: Croghan27
His rational was that people had anticipated and paid for his concert and it would be ripping them to not show up - it does not cut it with me all that well - but it has some principled points.


Actually, in that 1992 incident, Springsteen said he "did not want to get involved".  He was told afterwards that he got involved by crossing that picket line in the first place.

belva

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« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2007, 02:49:24 PM »
I very much like this perspective from Staughton Lynd, a Quaker historian & lawyer, whom I much admire.  This is from a speech he gave in Chicago two years (June of '05) ago at the 100th anniversary celebration for the IWW ("Wobblies").  


Quote
Perhaps I can end, as I began, with a story. About a dozen years ago my wife and I were in the Golan Heights, a part of Syria occupied by Israel in 1967. There are a few Arab villages left in the Golan Heights, and at one of them our group was invited to a barbecue in an apple orchard. There was a very formidable white lightning, called arak. It developed that each group was called on to sing for the other. I was nominated for our group. I decided to sing "Joe Hill" but I felt that, before doing so, I needed to make it clear that Joe Hill was not a typical parochial American. As I laboriously began to do so, our host, who had had more to drink than I, held up his hand. "You don't have to explain. We understand. Joe Hill was a Spartacist. Joe Hill was in Chile and in Mexico. But today," he finished, "Joe Hill is a Palestinian."
 
Joe Hill is a Palestinian. He is also an Israeli refusenik. He is imprisoned in Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo, where his Koran along with the rest of his belongings is subject to constant shakedowns and disrespect. He works for Walmart and also in South African diamond mines. He took part in the worldwide dock strike a few years ago and sees in that kind of international solidarity the hope of the future. Recently he has spent a lot of time in occupied factories in Argentina, where he shuttles back and forth between the workers in the plants and the neighborhoods that support them. In New York City, Joe Hill has taken note of the fact that a business like a grocery store (in working-class neighborhoods) or restaurants (in midtown Manhattan) are vulnerable to consumer boycotts, and if the pickets present themselves as a community group there is no violation of labor law. In Pennsylvania, he has the cell next to Mumia Abu Jamal at S.C.I. Greene in Waynesburg. In Ohio, he hangs out with the "Lucasville Five": the five men framed and condemned to death because they were leaders in a 1993 prison uprising. He was in Seattle, Quebec City, Genoa, and Cancun, and will be at the next demonstration against globalization wherever it takes place. In Bolivia he wears a black hat and is in the streets, protesting the privatization of water and natural gas, calling for the nationalization of these resources, and for government from below by a people's assembly. As the song says, "Where workingmen are out on strike, it's there you'll find Joe Hill."
 
Let's do our best to be there beside him.



Joe Hill lyrics

Artist - Joan Baez
Album - Carry It On

Quote
I dreamed I saw Joe Hill last night,
alive as you and me.
Says I But Joe, you're ten years dead
I never died said he,
I never died said he.

The Copper Bosses killed you Joe,
they shot you Joe says I.
Takes more than guns to kill a man
Says Joe I didn't die
Says Joe I didn't die

And standing there as big as life
and smiling with his eyes.
Says Joe What they can never kill
went on to organize,
went on to organize

From San Diego up to Maine,
in every mine and mill,
where working-men defend there rights,
it's there you find Joe Hill,
it's there you find Joe Hill!

I dreamed I saw Joe Hill last night,
alive as you and me.
Says I But Joe, you're ten years dead
I never died said he,
I never died said he.

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #22 on: July 18, 2007, 03:15:56 PM »
Wow!  Belva thank you so much for that excerpt of a speech by Staughton Lynd.  

There is rhetoric, sadly all too often empty these days, and then there is rhetoric in the form of truly inspiring & heartlfelt words, as those are.

jrootham

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« Reply #23 on: July 18, 2007, 04:35:58 PM »
Quote from: arborman
What I want to see is Dilbert put to music, I guess.

If anyone has any suggestions by all means, bring it on.  I need an anthem I guess.


White Collar Holler

White Collar Holler
(Nigel Russell)

Well, I rise up every morning at a quarter to eight
Some woman who's my wife tells me not to be late
I kiss the kids goodbye, I can't remember their names
And week after week, it's always the same

And it's Ho, boys, can't you code it, and program it right
Nothing ever happens in the life of mine
I'm hauling up the data on the Xerox line

Then it's code in the data, give the keyboard a punch
Then cross-correlate and break for some lunch
Correlate, tabulate, process and screen
Program, printout, regress to the mean

Then it's home again, eat again, watch some TV
Make love to my woman at ten-fifty-three
I dream the same dream when I'm sleeping at night
I'm soaring over hills like an eagle in flight

Someday I'm gonna give up all the buttons and things
I'll punch that time clock till it can't ring
Burn up my necktie and set myself free
Cause no one's gonna fold, bend or mutilate me.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright Nigel Russell and dedicated to the city of Bramalea,
Ontario, Canada.

Recorded by Stan Rogers on Between the Breaks - Live, Fogarty's
Cove Music, FCM-002
DC

First time I heard this I was doing a programming contract for Xerox.  There I was, in my suit and tie, at the Groaning Board on Bay, listening to Stan Rogers.

sparqui

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« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2007, 12:43:41 AM »
I miss Stan Rogers  :(
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

skdadl

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« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2007, 08:38:56 AM »
Damn fine, Lynd and Russell/Rogers both.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #26 on: July 19, 2007, 09:20:10 AM »
I miss Stan Rogers too, and Stringband and, especially, Perth County Conspiracy (does not exist). Cedric Smith was such a great member of PCC. I still have four of their albums on LP records. The members of Stringband are still recording individually, I think. Bob Bossin is in BC and having a great time - we email occasionally.

skdadl

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« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2007, 09:50:00 AM »
Ah -- Stringband. Do you know, Boom Boom -- for a time, Bob Bossin was turning up on babble? That was fun. He didn't post often, but he's nice.

Marie-Lynn Hammond was a neighbour of mine and the first person I got to know when I joined the Annex Cat Rescue. My two youngest ferals, Ollie and Phillie, came from her -- she was fostering them on top of having a houseful of her own, but then she was coping with loss in her family as well, and no one knew what to do with Ollie and Phillie (especially Phillie, who would have been put down by the Humane Soc -- adolescent feral male), so I took them ... temporarily, you understand. Back in '99.  :D

She took a bad fall from her horse last year and had a bit of a time getting better, but she's working again and doing well.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #28 on: July 19, 2007, 10:03:18 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
Ah -- Stringband. Do you know, Boom Boom -- for a time, Bob Bossin was turning up on babble? That was fun. He didn't post often, but he's nice.

yes, that's how I found out where he was - I pm'd him a few times.


Marie-Lynn Hammond was a neighbour of mine and the first person I got to know when I joined the Annex Cat Rescue.

She took a bad fall from her horse last year and had a bit of a time getting better, but she's working again and doing well.


Sorry to hear about her accident - I didn't know. She's a nice person.

I think I have four Stringband LPs. I'll have to see if they're on CD.

belva

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« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2007, 10:23:45 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
and no one knew what to do with Ollie and Phillie (especially Phillie, who would have been put down by the Humane Soc -- adolescent feral male), so I took them ... temporarily, you understand. Back in '99.  :D.


yeah, right, temporarily--yeah, sure thing! :whis:  :roll:

 :cat:  :doh:  :bigeyes:  :cat:  :whis:

 

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