Author Topic: Deaf and hard of hearing in Canada *still* screwed  (Read 5957 times)

Boom Boom

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Deaf and hard of hearing in Canada *still* screwed
« on: August 13, 2007, 10:22:19 PM »
Ruling on Closed Captioning in Movie Theatres Advances Social Justice in Ontario Say Elementary Teachers

http://tinyurl.com/2gg2yh

excerpt:

"Once this settlement is implemented, theatres equipped with closed captioning systems will be widespread in our province. Hopefully, we will all see the day when closed captioning capacity is the norm in theatres across Canada."

Just Ontario??? WTH?  :rant2:

ETA: Mods - if there is a disability forum, could you move this thread there? Thankee. :age:

lagatta

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« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2007, 03:48:13 AM »
Hi Boom Boom - I had started up a (dis)ability thread in Health - health of course also refers to general well-being - but it is fine in this forum as well. All the other threads pertaining to disability matters were too specific in dealing with other conditions or issues (arthritis, chronic pain, injured workers etc).

Well, one could say it is a first step, though it should also be federal, I believe (not sure about the jurisdiction issues). I am unfamiliar with the technology required - could you explain?

I'm going to Amsterdam - there traffic lights start to flash before a change between green and red for hearing-impaired people and there is also a change in sound signal for visually-impaired people. Every tramline in the city now has trams accessible to people in wheelchairs or with limited mobility (also useful for parents with strollers) and tram stops are announced both by voice and by a visual signalisation, for visually and hearing-impaired people (and for everyone).
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Boom Boom

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Deaf and hard of hearing in Canada *still* screwed
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2007, 09:24:02 AM »
According to Human Rights Commission settles claim with respect to the exhibition of closed captioned movies the technology is still being developed.

excerpt:

The settlement includes the installation of new closed captioning systems
in multiple Ontario theatres. These installations will occur on a phased-in
basis following a comprehensive selection and testing period of new
commercially available closed captioning systems by the exhibitors. Most of the exhibitors have also agreed to add a closed captioning system to all new theatres opened in the province of Ontario. The agreement also includes the appointment of a monitor to oversee settlement obligations.

Boom Boom

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« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2007, 09:28:19 AM »
Quote from: lagatta

I'm going to Amsterdam - there traffic lights start to flash before a change between green and red for hearing-impaired people and there is also a change in sound signal for visually-impaired people. Every tramline in the city now has trams accessible to people in wheelchairs or with limited mobility (also useful for parents with strollers) and tram stops are announced both by voice and by a visual signalisation, for visually and hearing-impaired people (and for everyone).


That sounds like a place I could live. I remember living in Toronto, when I took the subway, the stops were announced over a loudspeaker, but, being deaf, I could not understand what they were saying until I looked at the subway map (posted on the wall) and tried to connect what I was hearing to the list of subway stops posted on the wall. Those loudspeakers distorted the sound of the human voice just enough to make them difficult for me to understand. I relied on the subway map, not the loudspeakers, to anticipate the next stop. :(

Boom Boom

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« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2007, 09:32:24 AM »
Caption Movies Now Coalition

MANDATE

To ensure 100% quality captioning on all movies at movie theatres everywhere in Canada.

Guiding Principles:

This movie captioning shall be in a format enjoyed and easily read by deaf, deafened and hard of hearing movie-goers. The movie captioning shall evolve over time as technology changes and the best technology, in terms of user-friendly format, should be deployed where possible. Moreover, this movie captioning shall be widely published and easily accessed by deaf and hard of hearing movie-goers. The cycle of effectively publicizing movie captioning begins when a movie becomes promoted to the public before official release, and ends when the movie is released in the form of tapes or disks for home entertainment.

In terms of responsibility, the distributors or studios that supply the movies shall ensure that the most optimal captioning, as described above, are part and package of all the movies themselves, before release. The exhibitors, such as the movie theatres, shall retrofit their theatres as necessary to enable all the movies to display the captions to deaf, deafened and hard of hearing movie-goers, all times of the day, all year long, for all movies, regardless if any movies do not have captioning. Both suppliers and exhibitors will upgrade their technology over time as discussed above, and regularly consult with the deaf and hard of hearing community.

(it looks to me that anyone can join this coalition)

lagatta

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« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2007, 10:14:58 AM »
Yes, I'm sure current technology would make such captioning feasable.

Well, Amsterdam is a lot smaller than Toronto, though you might find it too close and urban. I haven't travelled much to other Dutch cities and certainly haven't "lived" in them enough to observe every-day life technology in relation to disabilities and inevitable restrictions that come with age.

I wouldn't be happy living there as it is built on staves in the sea (like Venice) and as a result the weather is very damp; it is not a happy place for people who tend to suffer arthritic pain. Though being able to ride one's bicycle almost every day of the year would be an aid in staying in shape... It never gets very hot or very, very cold. The closest Canadian equivalent would be some parts of BC, but Amsterdam is also flat as a football pitch and even the "natural" parts of the country are pretty flat.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Croghan27

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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2007, 11:11:19 AM »
Quote
I remember living in Toronto, when I took the subway, the stops were announced over a loudspeaker, but, being deaf, I could not understand what they were saying until I looked at the subway map (posted on the wall) and tried to connect what I was hearing to the list of subway stops posted on the wall. Those loudspeakers distorted the sound of the human voice just enough to make them difficult for me to understand. I relied on the subway map, not the loudspeakers, to anticipate the next stop.


Boom Boom - I used to giggle at that while riding the subway - it was not your hearing, I firmly believe that as part of the test for subway drivers they have to speak a language that is related to English, but has different pronounciation.

I could not understand them without the map either.  :annoyed:
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

lagatta

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« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2007, 01:17:56 PM »
Once I was in Florence, where I had to change trains for Venice, and there was an announcement in Italian, French, English and German about the train to Venice leaving from a different track than foreseen.

In theory, I understand all those languages.

I didn't catch a single word of the announcement and had to take a later train. The ticket seller said that it had been announced ... I was lucky my ticket was still valid.

Now there are far more visual, electronic announcements....

Though I guess now it is the visually-impaired who could be screwed...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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Deaf and hard of hearing in Canada *still* screwed
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2007, 01:31:49 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
... I didn't catch a single word of the announcement and had to take a later train. The ticket seller said that it had been announced ... I was lucky my ticket was still valid.

Now there are far more visual, electronic announcements.... Though I guess now it is the visually-impaired who could be screwed...
eheh ... Italian trains ....

lagatta

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« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2007, 01:37:04 PM »
Italy is the only place we have ever seen a train leaving EARLY.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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Deaf and hard of hearing in Canada *still* screwed
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2007, 02:12:46 PM »
That must have been a surprise for travellers who arrived at the scheduled time to discover the train had LEFT.  :lol:

skdadl

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« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2007, 02:21:43 PM »
Way back in '69 or '70, maybe, Mel Watkins came to Edmonton to give a talk at the uni, and of course his local contact was my then-boss, Mel Hurtig.

So there was the predictable party at Uncle Mel's (Mel H) later, whereat the manager of Uncle Mel's bookstore and I were put in charge of herding cats and the guest and watching the time, since the guest had to make a plane back to Toronto that night, and the Edmonton airport is 'way to hell and gone at Leduc.

So of course we started getting nervous fairly early on and doing a kind of tag-team nagging routine with Watkins -- "Maybe time to go now?" I still remember him laughing at us and repeating several times, "No plane in history ever left early."

deBeauxOs

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Deaf and hard of hearing in Canada *still* screwed
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2007, 02:38:50 PM »
Seems like it was quite the fun melee.   :P

peppermint

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« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2007, 10:00:50 PM »
RE the subway announcements.  The only place I've ever been in where they were understandable was in Seoul.  They have the same stop announcement on buses too, which can be convenient

 The Korean transportation system is oddly disability friendly in relation to the rest of the country.  The newer trains have signs that flash the name of upcoming stops in Korean, Chinese, Japanese and English; and every station has special patterned tiles in the floor that are like a tactile trail for the visually impaired.  long grooves indicate a path. Lumps indicate stairs or a point where the doors for the train will open.  

Compare that with the fact that the public elementary school that I worked at didn't have an elevator until late 2006.  Before that, students in wheel chairs had to be carried up all 5 floors sometimes.

skdadl

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« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2007, 06:50:50 AM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Seems like it was quite the fun melee.   :P


At times it was quite mellow.  :D

See, it takes me two days to come up with a pun, and deBeauxOs can snap 'em out right away. It's not fair!

 

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