Author Topic: Autumnal foods  (Read 12975 times)

lagatta

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Autumnal foods
« on: October 31, 2007, 01:01:34 PM »
It is still rather warm here, but the trees are starting to get bare and we move on to winter squash, the tougher greens, cabbages, storage vegetables and provisions...

Lucy Waverman's chicken-thigh based take on Osso Buco Osso Beako is a variation of a dish i make quite often with chicken legs cut into four parts, on the bone. Have your butcher cut through the bones, unless you are very handy with a cleaver.

I didn't quite make her dish, but combined the technique she uses with a ginger claypot chicken recipe - though that recipe uses boneless chicken thighs and I much prefer bits on the bone, unless you are feeding to small children or others who might have a hard time with the little bony bits (and potential bone shards). In addition to fresh ginger cut into fine julienne, I added fine slices of a kind of small round sweet red pepper we get this time of year (it is red all the way through, and has more flavour than ordinary bell peppers), my last piment d'Espelette (semi-hot Basque pepper), some finely sliced onion and one garlic clove. Unlike Waverman, I do remove the skin, and all visible fat - simmering at a very low heat, the meat doesn't dry out, with all the veg. I brown everything slightly, in a wok as that way I can use very little oil.

Ginger is very good for the health, and tonic this time of year.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

steffie

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Re: Autumnal foods
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2007, 01:31:37 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
It is still rather warm here, but the trees are starting to get bare and we move on to winter squash, the tougher greens, cabbages, storage vegetables and provisions...


Cabbage rolls!!    :drool

I wonder if they would work with ground moose meat instead of beef.  Any wild game experts out here?
Let the beauty of what you love be what you do - Rumi

justme

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2007, 01:33:27 PM »
Oh yes, ground moose meat is good in cabbage rolls (I think so anyway!).  I like to make cabbage rolls with pickled cabbage - yum - but I haven't been able to find any for sale here . . .

lagatta

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« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2007, 01:46:51 PM »
justme, I forget where you live.

Pickled cabbage isn't as common here as in cities with a larger Slavic population, but Balkani, a shop at the Jean-Talon market run by a Romanian and a Russian-Romanian (hence they cater to quite a gamut of Eastern Europeans, from North to South) sells it.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

justme

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2007, 01:48:28 PM »
Lagatta, I live just outside Halifax/Dartmouth.  There seems to be very few ethnic food stores here, or else they are very well hidden!

k'in

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2007, 02:30:18 PM »
The tasty little organic apples (Macs & Spartans) from Quebec are once again available at the market.  They actually taste like apples and not sawdust.

The basil survived Sunday into Monday's cooold night, covered by the burlap.

Made a stick to your ribs style organic vegetarian risotto/stew creation.  Winged it but it contains short grain brown rice, navy beans, mushed up tomatoes, garlic, portobello mushrooms, zucchini and red pepper.  Also added chopped carrots, a bunch of garden herbs, and other stuff I can't remember.

deBeauxOs

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2007, 07:58:26 PM »
That sounds quite yummy.  I've found a place that sells Italian chestnuts, which I'm planning to roast in the oven.  There may be other things that are as simply and exquisitely tasty as freshly roasted chestnuts but I can't think of them at the moment.   :drool

lagatta

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2007, 08:08:33 PM »
Hmm, en hiver, sur les marchés en Italie et à Paris - dernièrement à Montréal, au marché Jean-Talon, mais trop cher...

Il faut faire une croix dans les marrons, comme ça, ils sont plus faciles à ouvrir et s'éclatent moins...

Où, à Ottawa, dans la petite Italie, ou au marché?
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2007, 09:17:35 PM »
Au marché.  By Ward Fruits and Vegetables, une petite entreprise de famille qui a toujours des provisions de qualité.  La proprio a aussi démarré une petite co-op de légumes bio, en saison.

kuri

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2007, 10:31:45 AM »
Making a curried pumpkin soup tonight in the slow cooker, with stock from a roast chicken carcass from night before last.

Finally finished up the beets with that chicken - L. was getting a little tired of beets. I still love 'em, tho.

skdadl

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2007, 10:34:07 AM »
Beets! Time for borscht! Wonderful with ham.

skdadl

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2007, 06:39:25 PM »
I don't know whether it's autumnal or not to crave creamy stuff -- maybe this should go in comfort food. But I was craving some seafood over linguine  yesterday, so I tossed some very nice shrimps, tail on, with little green onions and mousewombs in the wok, cheated with the Knorr Alfredo sauce, and did my linguine, which I fully intend to repeat tonight. Yum yum.

deBeauxOs

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2007, 08:42:52 PM »
Some of those Knorr sauces are good cheats.  I use the Hollandaise, but I make it lighter - no butter, use a tiny amount of olive oil, add lemon juice, water, stir it until it's done then throw a fistful of slivered basil leaves in before serving on poached eggs.  Yum.  That would be good with shrimps or scallops on pasta too, I think.

vickyinottawa

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2007, 09:29:31 PM »
we have a surplus of beets right now, leftover from the last couple of CSA shares.  and turnips.  we've got turnips.

I've been making stews - WeeG and webgeek love 'em.  Last one was caribou stew with potato, turnip, carrot and barley.  Very tasty but needed some red wine.  Next time.

kuri

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Autumnal foods
« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2007, 04:54:21 PM »
I'm not sure if this is specifically autumnal or not, but we made it in autumn and bottled it today after for first snow that's sticking for awhile. Today we bottled 9 wine bottles of apple cider vinegar. Was meant to be apple cider, but it didn't work out so well.  :oops:

I'd tried using some of it (prior to bottling) in this hot spiked cider recipe. So did not work. I managed to down a mug-full but it was not tasting so good. However, since it's vinegar and there's all sorts of lovely spices in there, I'm marinating some strips of pork in there for a stir-fry tomorrow. I think it should work well: spices, booze, apple vinegar and a bit of olive oil added in with the pork. I'm getting into a thing where I can't stand to throw stuff out - even my jack-o-lanterns have been roasted and pureed to put into pies and soups and baking.

 

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