Author Topic: 06Dec07 Action Ideas  (Read 14762 times)

Berlynn

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« on: November 01, 2007, 06:57:17 PM »
It's November and given the speed with which October passed, I'm thinking December will be here tomorrow!  Has anyone had any ideas about online actions for this year's National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women?  I ask because I'm thinking we have a strong enough network and circles of networks intersecting with us that we could make a point or two...

One thing I've been wondering is how the federal cuts to SWC have impacted/are impacting the work on the issue of violence.
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

Croghan27

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2007, 07:09:03 PM »
Code: [Select]
One thing I've been wondering is how the federal cuts to SWC have impacted/are impacting the work on the issue of violence

Yes, I have no clue on where to look for some stats on violence toward women, either before or after the cuts.

It would have to be even more that just justice stats - some way would have to be found to quantify violent incidences that are not reported, before and after: as well as those identified as needing concilling and cannot get it because of the cuts.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Debra

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2007, 07:20:49 PM »
Well last year I did the 14 posts on women's issues.

Maybe that could happen again but with at least 14 people from the board choosing one day, and then we cross post every post on all our blogs.

That way a wide variety of subjects could be tackled.
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Berlynn

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2007, 08:11:28 PM »
Oh, yes, Debra, those were fantastic!  I'm wondering if we can call on all progressives to post at least one of those 14 days, too.

I remember one year everyone uploaded a specific candle image with a link to an essay by Lee Lakeman of VAWAV.  It was a powerful thing to coast the info highway and see all the candles lighting the way...
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

fern hill

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2007, 12:21:48 PM »
:bump

ETA: For those of us without blogs, maybe use The Front Page?

lagatta

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2007, 01:33:30 PM »
Here is something from Université de Montréal/Conseil du statut de la femme: a grant for any graduate student doing a project on the vast (alas) subject of violence against women:
 http://nouvelles.umontreal.ca/content/view/624/221/

I'm a UdM grad, so I get this stuff in dead-tree form.


I haven't seen anything on the sites and lists I take part in. About the closest is the World March of Women's Declaration against Violence against women:

http://www.marchemondialedesfemmes.org/ ... 5555251/en
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Berlynn

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2007, 02:06:56 PM »
YWCA button campaign seems to still be going.
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

lagatta

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2007, 02:25:41 PM »
Oh, I especially like that one as it remembers the original victims.

Was reading the thread on this at babble, and there are activities in Tranna that seem to make no mention of Polytechnique. That really bothers me, I suppose because I was writing an exam a couple of buildings from there that evening, and will never forget it.

Not that I am averse to extending the scope of the day, whether in terms of violence against women or gun control. Reading the windup of the Pickton trial is making me very queasy - especially since, while I think there is no reasonable doubt about Picton's guilt, I'm sure others were as guilty in that mass murder of marginalised women, many of them Aboriginal.  :cry:
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

fern hill

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2007, 02:37:21 PM »
I'd like to extend the focus. I've been reading about something called obstetric fistula, which is really really not funny, definitely not Birth Pangs material. It is a horrible injury resulting from extended labour that just does not happen in the developed world, and hasn't for over 100 years. (I'll save the gory details for whatever and wherever I post.)

It got me thinking about 'unthinking violence' done to women. Imjuries that would be easy to avoid and fairly easy to remedy if there was only the will.

lagatta

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« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2007, 02:44:11 PM »
Hmm, I'm not sure about that extension - not opposed - know very well what obstetric fistula is and the horror of what it does to women, in both medical and social terms (as you know, I particpate frequently in "North-South" seminars about such matters).

The difference is that 6 December was a wilful crime against supposed "feminists" - actually, the Engineering department was anything but a hotspot for feminist activity - and fistula is one of the wide range of indignities wrought against women through the intersection of sexism, poverty, shaming of victims and general social inequality.

It certainly belongs in the 25 November declaration I posted above.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

GDKitty

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2007, 02:50:52 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
Was reading the thread on this at babble, and there are activities in Tranna that seem to make no mention of Polytechnique. That really bothers me, I suppose because I was writing an exam a couple of buildings from there that evening, and will never forget it.

 :?: That's strange...I don't think I've ever attended a Dec 6th memorial where the Montreal Massacre wasn't foremost (Guelph, UWO or McMaster).  

The announcements regarding this year's UofToronto, McMasterU and UWO memorials each mention the Montreal Massacre.

That said, I think it's important to "use" these ceremonies to broaden understanding about VAW, so that people don't walk away with the impression that this was an isolated event.  When I was at UWO, we always included a 15th candle for Linda Shaw (a Western student who was brutally murdered in 1990).  

At last year's McMaster Engineering Dec 6 memorial, we began by laying roses for the 14 women at Polytechnique, and then someone laid a bundle of roses for the missing/murdered First Nations women, particularly Edmonton and Vancouver's downtown east-side.

lagatta

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2007, 03:07:27 PM »
Yes, I thought it was odd as well. But I guess some people and groups have their own agendas.

We have to broaden these issues - but the systemic violence against Aboriginal women also deserves its own focus and solemn commemoration, in the context of violence against women but also the destruction of Aboriginal communities throughout the Americas and elsewhere, and resistances to that.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

fern hill

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2007, 03:13:39 PM »
Well, lucky for the blogosphere, lefties don't have to agree.

GDKitty

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2007, 03:16:50 PM »
Quote from: fern hill
I'd like to extend the focus. I've been reading about something called obstetric fistula, which is really really not funny, definitely not Birth Pangs material. It is a horrible injury resulting from extended labour that just does not happen in the developed world, and hasn't for over 100 years. (I'll save the gory details for whatever and wherever I post.)

It got me thinking about 'unthinking violence' done to women. Imjuries that would be easy to avoid and fairly easy to remedy if there was only the will.
So awful :cry:  About a month ago, I almost had to turn off a documentary about this, I was so upset.  "Child Brides" focused on the medical and social consequences of girls getting married (and having babies) in India (Rajasthan and Jodhpur), Niger (Maradi) and Guatemala (Santiago Atitlan, a Mayan community).  From the transcript:
Quote
HINOJOSA (NOW correspondent): One of the most devastating consequences of early marriage is that young girls who aren't ready are forced into pregnancy.

Niger has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. If the girl survives, often her baby does not. And she is left with lasting injuries.

Habi's wedding day came when she was 13 years old.

HABI: My parents forced me to get married. People were dancing but I was crying. At the end of the day, they pronounced us husband and wife. I ran away and hid at a relative's house, but they found me and brought me back to my husband. He was very happy because he wanted the marriage. I was too small to understand what marriage is.

HINOJOSA: In the past, husbands of child brides waited until their wives were older before they consummated their marriage.

EMIR: In the times of our grandparents it wasn't such a problem. Girls were married early, but if I may say it wasn't as if there was cohabitation. When the young girl went to her husband's, she was young, but she didn't sleep with her husband right away.

HINOJOSA: Now husbands aren't waiting. They force their underage wives into sex and early pregnancy.

HABI: I was worried about myself. I was very young to be pregnant. I thought I might die.

HINOJOSA: In Niger, there are only around 20 obstetricians for a population of 14 million. 85% of expecting mothers give birth at home. Habi was no exception.

HABI: I don't have words to describe the pain that I was feeling... They were treating me with some traditional medicine and the pain was getting worse. When I couldn't take it, anymore my parents brought me to the heath center at the next village.

They told me to keep on pushing, "the baby is coming! The baby is coming!" Because when the baby came it would be the end of my pain, but this was false.

DR. ABDOULAYE: In Habi's case, because of her young age we think that the head of the baby was too big for the size of her hips.

HINOJOSA: After four long days of labor Habi was finally transferred to a hospital in Maradi, where doctors performed a cesarean. Her baby was dead. But Habi's nightmare was far from over.

HABI: After I start to be sick, the urine did not stop.

HINOJOSA: Prolonged labor had ruptured Habi's bladder, leaving a hole called a Fistula. She is now incontinent.

The trauma also caused nerve damage in her left leg.


HABI: I cannot even put my sandals on it without using my hands....it hurts!

I suffered a lot. It was hell, marriage is hell.

HINOJOSA: But if marriage was hell, Habi can only look forward to more of the same if she returns to her village still leaking urine. Women and girls in her condition are ostracized by their communities, and even their families, outcasts because of their smell.

But Abdou Bala Marafa, the Emir of Gobir, has decided no girl should suffer such a fate.

EMIR: As the father of the community of Gobir, when I see a girl married too early, who became fistulous? Who can't contain her urine, who cannot live in the society, who is really marginalized. I don't have the right to stay seated and let things continue this way.

[...] (***in Guatemala***)

HINOJOSA: Daniel Fausto is 24 years old.

Why do you think your son married at 13 year old?

FAUSTO'S DAD: In my opinion, it's a lot easier to control a young girl.

HINOJOSA: Were you at all worried that Brenda is only?

FAUSTO: I see her as a grown woman.

[...]BRENDA: A lot of people have told me that it is very dangerous to have a baby at 13.

HINOJOSA: Do you get scared?

BRENDA: He could lose his life, that's what they have told me. Perhaps I could die by giving birth.

HINOJOSA: What do you feel during those times?

BRENDA: I get really nervous and anxious about it but I leave it in God's hands.

HINOJOSA: Brenda has good cause to be worried. At 13, she is five times more likely to die giving birth to her child than a twenty year old woman.

If she survives, she stands a good chance of joining more than 2 million girls and women around the world who suffer the physical trauma and social isolation of fistula.


(***back in Niger***)

At Niger's National Hospital in the capital of Niamey, they come from all over the country, hoping to find a surgical cure for their incontinence.

Dr. Abdoulaye Idrissa is one of only three surgeons in Niger trained to handle these kinds of cases. He works just as hard to educate his patients as he does to cure them.

ABDOULAYE: Sahiya, what do we say about early marriage:

SAHIYA: We said that some people have fistulas because of early marriage.

ABDOULAYE: When they arrive, they are educated on how to understand their rights, for them to understand what it is happening to them, because for them God is the one that has made this happen. We tell them, No, it is not only God, it's especially the hand of man, the hands of society.

HINOJOSA: Habi has spent the last three months waiting for a cure, and a chance to rejoin life.

HABI: I am very happy because I am going to have the surgery. I am not afraid.

DR. ABDOULAYE: These are girls who will be old before their time. We are stealing their youth, and that is extremely sad.

fern hill

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06Dec07 Action Ideas
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2007, 05:25:23 PM »
If we were going to do 14 posts -- like one a day -- we should have started already, yes?

 

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