Author Topic: Christmas is coming... arrrgh  (Read 28539 times)

sparqui

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« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2007, 07:48:21 PM »
As a kid, I loved Midnight Mass. I think I was the only one so it was a rare event. By Grade 7, I could go by myself.

I also enjoy the carols and other seasonal music. My dad forbade it in our house :-) He despised choral music in general and Christmas glurge in particular. His atheism manifested itself in strange ways.  :twisted:
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

Mandos

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« Reply #31 on: November 11, 2007, 11:46:08 PM »
I love Mass, especially watching it on TV.   Recently I was chatting with a colleague from a very Catholic country in South America, and I mentioned how entertaining I found Mass.  She was surprised, as she had only ever associated it with boredom.

fern hill

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« Reply #32 on: November 11, 2007, 11:55:15 PM »
Mass, especially old-style, is entertaining. And short. Compared to protestant bletherings.

Not that I'd seek either of them out. But when I were a sprout and coerced, I'd take the katlicks over the prods anytime.

Mandos

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« Reply #33 on: November 12, 2007, 01:08:13 AM »
The protestant stuff is great when it comes with a gospel choir.

Croghan27

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« Reply #34 on: November 12, 2007, 06:57:25 AM »
I feel like a commercial here: "Stop! Stop! You're both right."

I know of nothing outside of Catholicism that compares to a High Mass - three Priests, said in Latin, with almost recognized mysterious words, gorgeous and splendid robes, incense burning and a slight blurring of vision from the smoke in the enclosed church. The ceremony is awe inspiring.

On the other hand, dem proddies do have the best tunes ... "Oh Lord, my God, when I in constant wonder...."
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Boom Boom

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« Reply #35 on: November 12, 2007, 07:05:41 AM »
And High Church Anglicans do the High Mass in recognizable English.  And, if you're nice, you may get an invite to High Tea after. :wink:

skdadl

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« Reply #36 on: November 12, 2007, 07:13:34 AM »
Ahem. About so-called "high tea":

Quote
High tea

High Tea (also known as Meat Tea[1]) is an early evening meal, typically eaten between 5 and 6 o'clock in the evening. It would be eaten as a substitute for both afternoon tea and the evening meal. The term comes from the meal being eaten at the ‘high’ (main) table, instead of the smaller lounge table. It is now largely replaced by a later evening meal.

It would usually consist of cold meats, eggs and/or fish, cakes and sandwiches. In a family, it tends to be less formal and is an informal snack (featuring sandwiches, biscuits, pastry, fruit and the like) or else it is the main evening meal.

On farms or other working class environments, high tea would be the traditional, substantial meal eaten by the workers immediately after nightfall, and would combine afternoon tea with the main evening meal.

In recent years, High Tea has become a word for exquisite afternoon tea. However, this usage is incorrect and should be discouraged for reasons given below.

...

The term high tea is sometimes used in the United States to refer to afternoon tea or the tea party, a very formal, ritualised gathering (usually of ladies) in which tea, thin sandwiches and little cakes are served on the best china. This usage comes from misunderstanding the term high to mean formal. Most etiquette mavens advise that such usage is incorrect; (Judith Martin's tongue-in-cheek interpretation is, "It's high time we had something to eat.")Some drink it with cream or milk as well.

This form of tea is increasingly served in high-end U.S. hotels, often during the Christmas holidays and other tourist seasons, and a rising number of big-city teahouses, where it is usually correctly described as Afternoon Tea (see the history, above). An up and coming trend in hotels spas and high end restaurants is Tea Sommelier training[1].

Croghan27

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« Reply #37 on: November 12, 2007, 07:22:53 AM »
While visiting friends in Edmonton one time I took the kids (their's and ours) out to a bowling alley. When we got back my wife informed me that she and Brenda had gone to tea at the Mac .....

Unthinking me, mumbled that they should have waited and taken the kids - they always enjoy going to MacDonalds. They just looked at me strangely.  :patpat:

It took me a while to realize they had gone to High Tea at the MacDonald Hotel.  :tinfoil:
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Debra

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« Reply #38 on: November 12, 2007, 07:49:01 AM »
:lol:
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Boom Boom

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« Reply #39 on: November 12, 2007, 08:02:43 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
In recent years, High Tea has become a word for exquisite afternoon tea. However, this usage is incorrect and should be discouraged for reasons given below.


Yeah, but this is 2007, not 1007.

from: http://store.barrys-tea.com/articles/high_tea.html

There's the Queen, The Tower Bridge, Harrod's, Regent's Street, Polo and High Tea. All are very English but High Tea has become the epitome of all things Anglican.  :whis:

skdadl

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« Reply #40 on: November 12, 2007, 08:29:23 AM »
Boom Boom, no one in England was drinking tea in 1007.

Croghan27

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« Reply #41 on: November 12, 2007, 08:50:38 AM »
At one time most of the tea for North America came in through Saint John, N.B. It came in 'tea boxes' (what else  :shock:? ) that were very good if you were moving.

The ships docked at (get ready for it   :whis:   ) Dock Street (to the left of the picture.)
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Boom Boom

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« Reply #42 on: November 12, 2007, 08:58:48 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
Boom Boom, no one in England was drinking tea in 1007.


Well, my point was that High Tea has evolved  :age:

belva

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« Reply #43 on: November 12, 2007, 12:03:54 PM »
Quote from: Boom Boom
Well, my point was that High Tea has evolved  :age:



Darwin on high tea! I love it! :mrgreen:  :lol:  :rotfl:

Boom Boom

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« Reply #44 on: November 12, 2007, 01:18:44 PM »
Always happy to be of service. 8)

 

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