Author Topic: New Canada seafood guide  (Read 1517 times)

lagatta

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New Canada seafood guide
« on: November 24, 2007, 08:37:01 AM »
This could go in consumption as well http://www.seachoice.org searchable in English or French - with warnings about contamination and sustainability concerning many species.
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kuri

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New Canada seafood guide
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2007, 01:26:43 PM »
Thanks for posting this, lagatta. I have the little wallet card (much more handy when in the market.

I was actually at a fish and shrimp farm in Mexico while travelling there this week and was surprised to see that it was considered an environmentally good choice - I always thought that fish farming was risky, though maybe it depends on the scale and what species is farmed. I don't see farmed shrimp as an option on the SeaChoice guide - only trawl-caught in warmwater, which would be bad. I'll have to look into that more.

arborman

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New Canada seafood guide
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2007, 06:26:35 PM »
Quote from: kuri
Thanks for posting this, lagatta. I have the little wallet card (much more handy when in the market.

I was actually at a fish and shrimp farm in Mexico while travelling there this week and was surprised to see that it was considered an environmentally good choice - I always thought that fish farming was risky, though maybe it depends on the scale and what species is farmed. I don't see farmed shrimp as an option on the SeaChoice guide - only trawl-caught in warmwater, which would be bad. I'll have to look into that more.


If farmed in contained locations on dry land it is fine.  It is the intensive farming in nets in the ocean that is having all kinds of problems.

And it does depend on the species.  Shellfish farming is relatively benign (scallops, oysters, mussels, shrimp).  Salmon not so much.

In central europe they've been growing carp in small ponds for 1500 years, so it probably qualifies as sustainable as well.
The pleasures of the table are for every man, of every land, and no matter what place in history or society; they can be a part of all his other pleasures, and they last the longest, to console him when he has outlived the rest.

 

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