Author Topic: Expressions to say goodbye to  (Read 3778 times)

skdadl

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Expressions to say goodbye to
« on: January 01, 2008, 09:45:47 AM »
The annual list of terms and locutions that deserve to be banned, from Lake Superior State University at Sault Ste Marie (Michigan):

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Some words and phrases sagged under the weight of overuse, contributors said, citing the application of "organic" to everything from computer software to dog food.

In the same vein, decorators offering to add "pop" with a touch of color need new words, the list-makers said.

Such phrases as "post 9/11" and "surge" have also outlived their usefulness, they said. Surge emerged in reference to adding U.S. troops in Iraq but has come to explain the expansion of anything.


Heckuva still seems good to go, though.   :mrgreen:

RP.

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« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2008, 12:21:25 PM »
I'm quite of tired of "I'm in your X, Ying your Zs."

skdadl

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« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2008, 12:26:59 PM »
RP, go to the "Definitions" thread and tell me about "presume" and "assume." Plz.  :)

Croghan27

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« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2008, 01:24:20 PM »
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Surge emerged in reference to adding U.S. troops in Iraq but has come to explain the expansion of anything.


I have always taken the non-Iraqi and recent use of 'surge' as a small slap at the whole concept that the Iraq conflict will be 'solved' by more troops.

Like in this clip. (for another fairly new cliche')
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

RP.

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« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2008, 08:33:36 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
RP, go to the "Definitions" thread and tell me about "presume" and "assume." Plz.  :)


I wish I could oblige, but I don't know where that thread is and I don't think I could do it.

skdadl

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« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2008, 08:37:45 AM »
RP, here is the Definitions thread. Belva has offered a lawyerly answer; I am just wondering whether the distinction is generally important to lawyers.

belva

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« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2008, 11:04:15 AM »
Quote from: skdadl
RP, here is the Definitions thread. Belva has offered a lawyerly answer; I am just wondering whether the distinction is generally important to lawyers.



As one of my favorite profs in law school used to say, "Law is like poetry--it's about the meaning of words."

lagatta

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« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2008, 11:13:07 AM »
Belva, your prof was half right. Like poetry, law relies on the precise meaning of words, but there is a difference. Poetry tends to be polysemic - each word evokes multiple meanings, while in law, one strives to restrict each word's meaning as much as possible, ideally a single one.

This also from a course long ago, in which we were discussing technical translation - such as legal - vs literary translation.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

belva

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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2008, 11:30:26 AM »
Quote from: lagatta
Belva, your prof was half right. Like poetry, law relies on the precise meaning of words, but there is a difference. Poetry tends to be polysemic - each word evokes multiple meanings, while in law, one strives to restrict each word's meaning as much as possible, ideally a single one.


well, I think that depends upon the litigation or administrative process--sometimes, especially in work I do, the effort is to expand the inclusiveness of the language---that's the heart I think of all civil rights litigation---also, consider the current debate over "gay" marriage

lagatta

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« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2008, 11:51:15 AM »
Very interesting, belva. I guess it was because this course (given by a person who was strongly in favour of civil and social rights and who would certainly have supported marriage for persons of the same sex, but who alas died in 1996) addressed translators and interpreters, not law students (though some did have a legal background and many of us had worked in the field - in my case primarily in for trade unions, translating collective agreements and other  matters relating to labour law).

Of course one also finds the difference between legal systems based on Common Law and those based on a Civil Code.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

RP.

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« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2008, 02:50:54 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
while in law, one strives to restrict each word's meaning as much as possible, ideally a single one.


If I were drafting a statute, yes.  If I were making an argument, not necessarily.  If I wanted wiggle room in a contract, maybe not.

deBeauxOs

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Re: Expressions to say goodbye to
« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2008, 12:26:41 PM »
Eminently readable content by Russell Smith, How bean counters and mad men kill creativity.  ;)
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The idea of media as a vehicle for "content" is a virus. It's a subtle diminution of the importance of creative people and thinkers. To talk about your cultural artifact as a brand or a vehicle is to think of its creators as paid suppliers, as small cogs in a machine.

 

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