Author Topic: The Plame Thread  (Read 236760 times)

skdadl

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2006, 10:11:57 AM »
Reading. Registered. Valuable archive.

Debra

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #31 on: December 19, 2006, 05:34:53 PM »
http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2006/12/1 ... 61219.html
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A lawyer in the CIA leak case confirmed Tuesday that U.S. Vice-President Dick Cheney will testify as a defence witness at the trial.

"We're calling the vice-president," lawyer Ted Wells, representing defendant I. Lewis (Scooter) Libby, told a federal judge. Libby is Cheney's former chief of staff and faces charges of perjury and obstruction.

Speculation that Cheney would testify in the trial started early last week when Special Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald stated he did not expect the White House to oppose calls for Bush administration officials to testify.

While sitting presidents — including Bill Clinton, Gerald Ford and George Bush Sr. — have been known to testify in criminal cases, presidential historians know of no vice-president who has ever done so.
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

skdadl

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #32 on: December 19, 2006, 05:53:18 PM »
I wonder whether this will be televised. I'd like to watch the Snarl Incarnate trying to save both Libby and himself. For most people that would mean dealing with a contradiction, but the Snarl has never let that sort of thing stop him. O' course, if he has to, he will just throw Libby overboard.

Toedancer

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #33 on: January 03, 2007, 11:15:26 AM »
Quote
Plame's identity was first revealed by syndicated columnist Robert Novak. She believes she was outed as retribution for her husband's criticism of the Bush administration's prewar intelligence on Iraq.

    Jurors likely won't hear much about the leak itself because the original source, former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, has already confirmed his role and Libby is not charged with the leak. But the trial is certain to renew questions about whether the administration used reporters to drum up support for the war.

    Roy Peter Clark, a scholar at the Poynter Institute, a school and resource center for working journalists, said he worries about the fallout from the trial. If it's perceived that reporters grant anonymity to officials engaged in political gamesmanship, prosecutors might be more likely to subpoena them in cases where anonymity was granted in serious issues of public importance.

    "This case, it's magnified by the fact that it's in Washington and the status of the players," Clark said. "It's a bizarre and I'd say dangerous case."
*snip*
 President Bush did not include Libby on his list of pre-Christmas pardons, and the Justice Department said he does not have a pending pardon application on file.


http://www.truthout.org/docs_2006/010207E.shtml

Between this and Lt. Watada's prosecutors also using journalists/reporters, this is dangerous. People will rightly believe there is no anonymity with reporters anymore. Sickening and calculated.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Debra

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #34 on: January 12, 2007, 09:23:43 PM »
http://news.nationaljournal.com/articles/0112nj1.htm
Quote
Russert is expected to be a crucial prosecution witness against Libby. Miller and Cooper are also likely to testify that Libby never said that he was merely passing along rumors heard from Russert and other journalists when he told them that Plame was a CIA officer, if their trial testimony is consistent to what they have already testified to the federal grand jury.

Libby also testified that when he told reporters that Plame was a CIA officer he had totally forgotten by then that that he might have been originally told that information by Cheney. Investigators are still attempting to determine whether he made the claim to protect Cheney.

In a further possible attempt to protect Cheney, Libby also testified to the grand jury that he did not believe he had discussed that Plame worked for the CIA with Cheney during the critical period that Libby was leaking such information to the press -- and didn't discuss it with the vice president until after syndicated columnist Robert Novak first disclosed on July 14 that Plame was a CIA "operative."

It would be significant that Cheney and Libby only discussed Plame's CIA employment after the July 14 Novak column because instead of discussing a highly classified secret, the information would then have been considered public information, and not illegal, because Novak had disclosed it in his column.
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

Toedancer

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #35 on: January 12, 2007, 09:31:18 PM »
Drift - But may still get their pensions if convicted.

Quote
The National Taxpayers Union is pushing Congress to stop this by adding simple provision to the law: If you are convicted of a serious crime while in Congress, you lose the taxpayer-funded portion of your congressional pension.

I wanted to ask Congressman Rostenkowski what he thought about this, so I got his cell phone number from a friend and called him. That's when he answered, "Congressman Rostenkowski." But the senior statesman apparently picks and chooses his topics these days carefully.

"What benefit is it to me?" he asked, before denying my request for an interview. For an ex-con who's getting an estimated 126,000 benefits a year from taxpayers, keeping quiet makes a whole lot of cents!


http://tinyurl.com/yarz9j  cnn
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

pogge

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #36 on: January 16, 2007, 09:45:02 PM »
Scooter Libby's trial got under way today with the first day of jury selection. If you want to follow it closely you can keep an eye on Firedoglake. They have press passes and will be "live-blogging" the trial. Their first installment is here. The best line was probably this from a juror who was excused.
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"I am completely without objectivity. There is nothing you can say that would make me feel positively about President Bush."

skdadl

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #37 on: January 17, 2007, 09:04:10 AM »
That is a superb report, isn't it? Very good reading of the defence team, I'll bet, especially this:

Quote
What's more, Libby's lawyers regularly ask pro forma questions about the possibility of forgetting things, and about the possibility that different accounts of past events could be due to bad recollections held in good faith.  Their questions are so mundane, however, it seems to me as if they are just using the questions to presell their case, a foretaste of the closing  defense argument.

I'm hooked. Ok, I've been hooked for years, but now I'm even more so.

I ask again: does anyone know whether this is being televised?

I loved this, of course, of that nice Mr Fitzgerald and a woman who is clearly smarter than the average bear:

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He can also be slyly charming.  As one woman mentioned she has three children, Fitzgerald responded, "I take it these are young children?"  Instantly, and with a southern twang, the woman countered, "Oh, aren't you sweet!"


Ha!  :D

Debra

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #38 on: January 17, 2007, 09:50:14 AM »
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The trial will not be covered live on television because federal courts do not allow cameras in the courtroom, so in order to do detailed coverage, we need to be there in person.


from Firedoglake
“Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive.” —  Josephine Hart

skdadl

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #39 on: January 17, 2007, 09:51:08 AM »
Drat.

GDKitty

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #40 on: January 17, 2007, 10:35:11 AM »
There is a very-odd piece on Scooter in the NY Times today. (h/t Firedoglake, where else?): "As Trial Begins, Cheney’s Ex-Aide Is Still a Puzzle" By SCOTT SHANE (FDL thinks Shane is actually Judy Miller's ghost!)
Quote
Among Mr. Libby’s friends and former colleagues, the case brought by Patrick J. Fitzgerald, the special prosecutor, is considered not only unjust, but also a terrible irony.
“He’s going to be the poster boy for the criminalization of politics, and he’s not even political,” said Mary Matalin, Mr. Cheney’s former political adviser.
[...]Both fans and critics of Mr. Libby might be surprised by some anecdotes from Yale, where Mr. Libby graduated in 1972. Fellow students recall his helping silkscreen T-shirts proclaiming “solidarity” between Yalies and the Black Panthers and going with shoulder-length blond hair and in a leather jacket to help at an anti-Vietnam War demonstration.
A couple of years after graduation, a classmate, Donald Hindle, met Mr. Libby, then a student at the Columbia Law School, and noted a decidedly nonpolitical talent.
“He could remember not only all 79 ‘Star Trek’ episodes, as I could, but he knew all the titles, too,” Mr. Hindle said. “I think he always liked fantasy.”
:roll: Yeah. Tell me about it!
Here's something I definitely didn't know:
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Between government stints, Mr. Libby practiced law with the firm of Leonard Garment, counsel to President Richard M. Nixon. Mr. Garment remembers him as “reliable, immensely hard working and guarded.”
Presented with the seemingly intractable tax problems of a fugitive commodities trader, Marc Rich, Mr. Libby “went off for a year and worked on it, closeted with his own intellect,” Mr. Garment said.
He emerged with a creative analysis, Mr. Garment added, that would ultimately help persuade President Bill Clinton to pardon Mr. Rich, an act that Republicans criticized because Mr. Rich’s former wife, Denise, was a Democratic donor.
Yeah, didn't Clinton get whacked around by the media when he pardoned Rich?
Ok, back to the Scooter-love-letter:
Quote
“He puts up a tough front,” said Mr. Hogen, his school and ski buddy. “But there’s a kind human being in there who’s really gotten beat up in this affair.”
[...]Kenneth Adelman, a friend from the Reagan administration, invited the family for a week’s vacation in Colorado last summer and took Mr. Libby to lunch with a liberal, pacifist local columnist, Paul Andersen.
The two men had a long talk about wilderness and recited poetry from memory. Mr. Andersen learned later that he had been talking with a man whom he had considered a symbol for all that was wrong with an administration that he holds in contempt.
If Mr. Libby broke the law, Mr. Andersen said, he should be held accountable. But he said his views were more complicated after the lunch encounter.
“I got a feeling for him as a family man, a guy who likes the mountains,” Mr. Andersen said. “Later, it seemed like he was nursing some serious pain. It seemed a dreadful shame that circumstances can sometimes ruin lives.”

Ruin Scooter's life?! Don't get me started!!!  :rant2

skdadl

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #41 on: January 17, 2007, 11:02:04 AM »
Judith Miller's ghost -- no kidding!

That's what it takes, folks. Go out and get a lot of really meaty personal observations from people with famous names -- "'He was fascinated by Paul’s thinking,' recalled a friend, Francis Fukuyama" -- then take them home, put them in the blender or the food processor if you've got one, swirl briefly, and phone in to your editor at ... the bleeding so-called paper of record the  New York Times.   :roll:

You too could get paid for being an airhead.

Honestly, GDKitty, who does Mary Matalin think she is kidding?!? The guy she herself calls "Cheney's Cheney" is "not political"?!?

I suppose there is some sense in saying that. In a way, I don't think that Cheney is political. I think he is pure rapacious dominant male, and any kind of politics schmolitics that gets him where he wants to go will be good enough for him.

pogge

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #42 on: January 17, 2007, 12:55:36 PM »
Matt Stoller at MyDD has a post about Marcy Wheeler's new book Anatomy of Deceit. If you follow the coverage at Firedoglake you'll get to know Wheeler. She's the blogger known as emptywheel.

Quote
Dick Cheney's power in the White House, his network of hardliners, is as entrenched as ever.  Weakened and increasingly insecure, Bush may simply lash out to make a statement, an instinctive reaction among children but one that is dangerous when the person doing the lashing is the President of the United States.  We must and we are working to provide the debate that the press will not.  The book is out today, a timed release to prepare us for the trial of Scooter Libby.  This trial is at the heart of the debate over the coming war with Iran and Syria, because what Marcy shows is that the evidence strongly points to Cheney ordering the hit on Plame and the underming of American national security.  This trial is the closest proxy that we will be able to use to argue about Cheney's power and his intentions.  Even now, we are being sold a new war in Iran, a nuclear-tipped PR campaign.  Thankfully, we have Marcy's book to show us just how corroded the courtier class has become.

pogge

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GDKitty

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The Plame Thread
« Reply #44 on: January 23, 2007, 11:26:56 AM »
Ok, I can tell this isn't going to be a productive day for me at work...

Libby trial: Fitzgerald's opening statements

OMG, he's really layin'r out there. Powerpoint timelines, state-of-the-union "16 words" and the whole ball-o-wax!

 

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