Author Topic: Drought Tolerant Perennials  (Read 13137 times)

Toedancer

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Drought Tolerant Perennials
« on: May 30, 2006, 12:33:02 PM »
Yeah, well I just walked back from the village and was looking at people's gardens, wilted badly. I have been interested in drough tolerant perennials and annuals for awhile now. There is a perennial lady who sells hers for a buck each and now I am only buying those. So I started a list for those of you who, like me, just can't not have a garden to muck about in. I haven't done veggies yet, but will for next summer. Water is going to become an issue sooner than we think.

Perennials (that need 50% of the water that most others do)
Black Eyed Susan
Coneflowers (I got white this year, beside the White Obedience)
Perennial Bachelor buttons (groundrunners, so remove seedlings)
Daylily (there are around 20,000 hybrids, love em)
Candytuft (for borders, bloom in spring and bloom and bloom for weeks)
Tiger Lilies (well all ditch growers are resistant)

Annuals
Marigold
Zinnia
Geraniums
Spider Flowers
Cosmos (re-seed themselves)
Nasturtiums (yum for the wabbits)
Most herbs
Alyssum
Coleus
Lobelia

And of course lots of mulching to keep soil moist.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

skdadl

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« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2006, 02:30:04 PM »
In the running for my most favourite plant is the wee Arctic blue willow that the woman who did the major mucking-out of my place two years ago found for me.

In the Arctic, I think it stays very low, almost a ground cover. Down here, it becomes a small bush, and mine at the moment really needs radical pruning. That's easy and fun, though -- it's like cutting hair. You could almost do topiary on it, but I just keep mine a medium-sized ball.

I think it tolerates any conditions, being a toughie from the Arctic, and its leaves -- very fine, small groups -- really do look blue-ish in the right light. A most friendly plant.

vickyinottawa

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« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2006, 02:47:20 PM »
Russian Sage!  It's hardy!  It's beautiful!  It gets big and crazy!

Timebandit

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« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2006, 03:05:59 PM »
I have yet to figure out how to kill a tarragon plant.  Which is good, because it tastes nice on fish.

I'm trying out some shade perennials in my front yard.  I've planted an astilbe, some freckled violets, a creeping myrtle/primrose?, and a hardy orchid.  We'll see how they do this year.  Next year, I want to re-landscape the yard.
Whenever anyone has offended me, I try to raise my soul so high that the offense cannot reach it. -Rene Descartes, philosopher and mathematician (1596-1650)

brebis noire

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« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2006, 03:22:20 PM »
Mint. Grows like a weed, even among rocks.

Ajuga (bugle?) is nice ground cover and drought resistant. Flowers in spring, like right now.

Dianthus is very hardy, too. Nice perennial, flowers in June and has nice foliage the rest of the time.

lagatta

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« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2006, 03:45:29 PM »
brebis, be VERY careful with mint. It crowds out everything else.

We've been doing the digging and some of the landscaping in front of the co-op (four Montréal triplexes). Lots of work, but it will look purty. Some members bought perennials on sale 75% off at the end of last season, just before I moved here.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2006, 03:51:13 PM »
Myrtle, aka periwinkle or vinca, is one of my favouritest ground covers. If it's happy, it spreads like mad. In the spring, it is covered with the loveliest blue flowers, and then the rest of the time you have that cover of shiny dark green leaves to look at. It is a perfect plant.

That reminds me of flax. Flax flowers are very like myrtle flowers, maybe a little lighter in colour, but simply charming. The plant is higher, a discrete plant, not a ground cover, but when it is blossoming, the flowers come day after day for a while, in abundance. I suppose if you were talented you could harvest the stuff and make linen out of it.   :wink:

It is, unfortunately, a little sensitive. I never had a flax plant last more than two years -- dunno why.

brebis noire

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« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2006, 04:01:22 PM »
yup, lagatta, with the mint - I'm already on it. I have it in an enclosed rock space with some other herbs and I am merciless. I'm forcing it to grow among the rocks, which is better than dandelions and grass.

Timebandit

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« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2006, 04:21:27 PM »
Quote from: skdadl
Myrtle, aka periwinkle or vinca, is one of my favouritest ground covers. If it's happy, it spreads like mad. In the spring, it is covered with the loveliest blue flowers, and then the rest of the time you have that cover of shiny dark green leaves to look at. It is a perfect plant.


That's the stuff!  Blue periwinkle, shade loving and drought tolerant, or so the little propaganda tag reads.  We'll see how it does in the shade of my 90 yr old spruce tree!
Whenever anyone has offended me, I try to raise my soul so high that the offense cannot reach it. -Rene Descartes, philosopher and mathematician (1596-1650)

Toedancer

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« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2006, 04:22:11 PM »
Skdadl, not sure if your talking about everyday blue fax or not. Blue fax should re-seed and sow itself year after year. So I'm wondering perhaps if the soil is draining well, they can rot quite easily, which is the only sensitivity I am aware of.

OTT, you could try companion planting if you like them so much. Not sure but I think the linseed oil in flax offends some bugs; hopefully aphids the little bistards.

ETA: So where was I going with the companion planting? Oh yes, I like raw carrots and flax protects them.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

skdadl

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« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2006, 04:37:35 PM »
I'm sure that's the stuff, Toedancer, and it would reseed, moving about just a bit, the second year -- but after that, never again.

I've had parsley do the same, btw. I'm never sure whether I need new parsley so I always get some, just in case.

deBeauxOs

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« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2006, 10:53:23 PM »
Centaurae montana - a most gorgeous explosion of blue flowers, and if you keep on dead-heading the plants, they will produce blooms into September.  It self-seeds too.  A warning - it seems that this plant needs ants to help the buds open. Since it is beautiful as a cut flower, do as you would with peonies and leave the ants in the garden. Photo here.

lagatta

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« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2006, 03:17:38 AM »
Salut, deBeauxOs! Que c'est joli!

And I'm trying to visualise toedancer's everyday blue fax!  :shock:
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2006, 07:18:48 AM »
Ha! Greetings, deBeauxOs.   :)

"Will spread where happy" -- that sounds a lot like a condition I might have, although mine would be more "will spread from sitting at computer too much."

anne cameron

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« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2006, 08:46:29 AM »
Centauri Montana, huh?  So THAT'S what that is!!  It showed up in one of my re-cycled containers (it used to be the tub of an agitator-type washing machine!), and has taken hold there.  Twice I've dug it out and moved it, and it came back each time.  Now it's spreading along the fence around the dog yard...gorgeous but it's a good job I'm not an organized gardener or I'd go mad trying to "control" it.

Right now the brume is in full glory.  It's considered a "noxious weed" on the Island, but I like it.  It's another of those things which spread like wildfire, people are always cutting it down, digging it out , one of the neighbours went at his with a tiger torch (that was good for a half hour of excitment).

I have a "thing" I'm nurturing.  Years ago in the nursery in Powell River I saw this very tiny "thing" growing in one of those little two-inch starter pots with a hybrid primrose in it.  I wasn't all that interested in the primrose but the "thing" fascinated me.  It was obviously a "weed".  I took it to the cash and asked "what is this, please?" and the woman said Oh that's just a week, here I'll pluck it out for you. I said no thank you, and I bought the hybrid primrose, took the whole thing home, no idea which of the many primroses that particular one is at this point but the 'thing' is doing well.  It's some kind of clover but most of the leaf is almost black, just a thin strip of green around the edge of the leaves and most of the leaves are 4 or 5 leaf clover.  Haven't seen any hint of "flower" yet, it spreads by creeping out over the ground and has enlarged to about a foot and a half mass.  I'm trying to start babies from it this year, several friends want some of it.  And I haven't found anything in any plant book which even begins to look like the "thing".  Anyone have any ideas?  The leaves aren't big, it isn't one of those "shamrock" things, it's just four leaf clover, but black....I'm hoping it will spread out of that little strip in front of the sardine can and take over where the grass now grows.

 

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