Author Topic: Rose of Sharon advice  (Read 4111 times)

Toedancer

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Rose of Sharon advice
« on: September 19, 2006, 10:55:14 AM »
I was given 3 root bundles with leaves from my B-I-L's Rose of Sharon.
He had pruned it to become a tree that grew right in front/middle of his Grand River trailor home. It reached quite a height, past the roof, and was especially beautiful this summer. With it's pure white flowers they became a beacon of light at night. They are a hibiscus, so quite hardy and they transplant fairly well.

I am not planting them in the ground, as I very much want to move before spring. So I planted them in a large house container to keep indoors until I can transplant them another time. I'm scared I'm gonna lose them. The leaves at the bottom are yellowing. I know this is because they were probably stressed being transported all over the place. Or it could be the beginning of them dying. Does anybody know how they will do being indoors for fall/winter?
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

chcmd

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Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2006, 11:09:20 AM »
I can't speak to your particular plant, but I lift my rosemary out of the garden every fall (I plant it in its pot in the garden) and keep it in the garage over the winter.  As long as it is a cool and sunny spot it winters over quite well - drops a few leaves, but bounces right back when I put it back in the garden in the spring.
Feel the fear and do it anyway

Toedancer

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Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2010, 09:08:21 PM »
Holy Crap, I didn't know I had asked for advise here. Not needed anymore, the thing is now past my back porch and going towards the upper peeps back porch. And it's not white anymore, it's pinky, has been for the past few summers, must be the soil.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Toedancer

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Re: Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2010, 05:59:31 PM »
So my upstairs nabe gave me a mini pink hibiscus at Easter and said 'here'. I planted it wondering. OMG, it has a huge pink cluster right now. The Easter lilies have multiplied beside it and I will have big ones by Sept. Another nabe who knows I adore nosecones/echinacea gave me a transplant which is ridic neon purple/pink (I can't actually describe the colour), which I had never seen. This horrid hot humid summer has brought it to life, so I'm hoping we have a long lasting summer/fall so it can show. Meantime some years we see lottsa monarchs, some not so much, this year milkweed is everywhere and so are the monarchs. How do each know that? Nature is grand. I love her so much.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

skdadl

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Re: Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2010, 06:13:26 PM »
I haven't seen any big colourful flutterbyes (but then there's not that much in my garden to attract them), but I do have a number of small white ones (or moths). I guess they're looking for cabbages, of which I have none, alas.

Next year, always next year.

k'in

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Re: Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2010, 06:25:10 PM »
I love the Monarch butterflies.  Nothing is more peaceful than watching them stop by on a sunny day to interact with the milkweed.

Quote
Nathan Miller, a University of Guelph student who is   the study's lead author, suggested the key was milkweed, a plant that   monarch larvae feed on exclusively.
"(The butterfly) picks up isotope signatures from the milkweed and it stores them in its wing tissue," Miller explained.
"It provides essentially a marker that allows us to estimate where it was born, regardless of where we capture it."

Boom Boom

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Re: Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2010, 08:39:20 PM »
Not very many bees or butterflies here, just a couple of each as far as I can tell. And trillions of !@#$%^!!!! blackflies. You need mosquito netting here in the mornings and evenings.   :annoyed
 
 
ps: flowers are doing well, main veggie garden is dead.

lagatta

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Re: Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2010, 08:57:06 PM »
Sorry to hear about yer vegetable patch. Suspect you are just on the edge of what can be cultivated...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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Re: Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2010, 09:28:43 PM »
Well, you've been a lot more ambitious than I have, Boom Boom, and I think you've still got tomatoes, at least, in a greenhouse/frame?

If I'm to grow any food at all, I have to keep digging sections out from the turfs, so the best I can do this year is prepare space for next.

Next year! Keep the faith, kiddo!

Boom Boom

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Re: Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2010, 09:56:51 PM »
As I think I've mentioned already, my big veggie garden is on the edge of a cliff, and below it is all weeds right to the beach. I suspect the weeds are coming from underneath. The only real solution is to place a plastic tarp on top of the garden, then stones, sand, and topsoil, and compost, and start from scratch. I can't afford to do all that.
 
I think I also mentioned an alternative, which is to build a second small greenhouse and use that for veggies along with the other greenhouse.
 
In my current greenhouse, the tomato plants are about three feet high, no tomatoes yet, so I will be using special feeding solution to speed up their growth. Brocolli are also doing well, but it's a strange variety - not what I'm used to. In the main veggie garden, along with the weeds, I do have radishes ready for picking, and leafy green Oriental vegetables suitable for stirfry.
 
The flowers are awesome. Lillies, daffodils, wildflowers, and sunflowers.

Toedancer

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Re: Rose of Sharon advice
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2010, 02:05:50 PM »
Boom-Boom my nabes laughed at me because I planted 4 tomato plants in one of the worst parts of garden. No special soil, no nuthing, just plunked them into the ground. I gots tomatoes!! I did the same with 3 indoor rose plants, which are now rose bushes!! Man, this is the summer to experiment with.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

 

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