Author Topic: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?  (Read 4848 times)

fern hill

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2008, 06:42:34 PM »

deBeauxOs

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2008, 07:03:05 PM »
Yeah, well I'd bet that Morgan Tsvangirai still checks his vehicles for bombs, and has body guards.

fern hill

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2008, 07:19:24 PM »
No doubt, dBO. But I'm (perhaps irrationally) pleased that international pressure has had some effect.

Berlynn

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2008, 12:00:05 AM »
Seems to me that South Africa's Mbeki is doing a fantastic job, too.  I mean, frick, it cannot be easy with effing Mugabe at the table...not that he should even *be* at the table in the first place!
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

skdadl

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #19 on: February 26, 2009, 07:51:30 AM »
The cholera epidemic in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe is a catastrophe, entirely man-made.

There are other distressed states where it is easy to see how post-colonial and continuing imperial trauma and politics are prolonging the distress, and in its distant past, that was true for Zimbabwe too. But Mugabe is a problem of a different order.

Audrey

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2009, 11:59:11 PM »
Mugabe is clingnin on because he likes the power, fears prosecution, and I think he may be a bit out of reality as well- he's still seen as a war hero by some. Zimbabwe is a police state and the ZANU-PF control the majority of the government offices.

On another note, check out some TOTALLY KICK ASS FEMINSTS in Zimbabwe who have been fighting Mugabe http://wozazimbabwe.org/
Make revolution- love your body

Mandos

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2009, 12:32:15 AM »
I get the impression that a lot of his supporters view opposition to Mugabe as yet another colonial Western plot to undermine African independence.  Which, of course, may be true, but it's a common reductive reaction in some postcolonial polities to view it as a matter of principle to keep the local despot in power because he is local.  Certainly in, eg, India, there's a willingness on the part of some to say "But they're OUR crooks/fascists/oppressors."

deBeauxOs

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2009, 10:59:35 AM »
There was an interesting NPR reportage broadcast on Thursday about white poverty in South Africa.  At the beginning of it, I was talking back to the radio but by the end the journalists had made a good case that the poverty-stricken whites were not victims but happenstance fall-out from more equalitarian hiring policies.  It seems that the whites (seemingly Afrikaners) who are unemployed or unemployable still hold on to their sense of past entitlements and blame the democratic, political regime for their uneducated and unskilled status.
 :roll:

skdadl

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2009, 12:40:15 PM »
Well, there were class divisions in white apartheid South Africa, as there are in all Western nations (all nations, actually, but the ones we know best are the class divisions produced by Western capitalism).

They've always had a white proletariat, a white rural population, some of whom were/are very rich but some of whom were/are very poor (and everything in between), and a white underclass below those. And then there are the cultural differences between British- and Dutch-descent white South Africans, which are complex and profound, for historical reasons no one can feel proud of.

The ANC revolution was glorious, but it was only a first step. Race never explains everything in capitalism; no one thing does, and South Africa is evidence. They are still a very dangerous, messed-up society.

Many proletarians and most of the utterly deprived in any society are going to turn first to witch-hunting unless they have intelligent political leadership (yay, unions). That underclasses have vile politics doesn't automatically mean that they aren't victims -- usually, they are, but they just don't have the political and intellectual skills to get themselves out of that hole.

brebis noire

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Re: Zimbabwe: Is this possible?
« Reply #24 on: May 10, 2009, 09:06:30 AM »
Jenni Williams, founder of Woza

Quote
At 47, Jenni Williams has experienced more brutality than most of us will face in a lifetime. She is the founder of the underground activist movement Women of Zimbabwe Arise (Woza), an organisation that, since 2003, has been mobilising Zimbabwean women to demonstrate in defence of their political, economic and social rights. In a fragmented country where women are marginalised by patriarchy, downtrodden by severe financial hardship (official inflation runs at 7,000%) and weakened by the acute lack of food or clothing for themselves and their children, Williams faces an almost insurmountable daily struggle simply to keep going.

Under Mugabe's dictatorship, the threat of state-sanctioned violence is ever-present. Despite being a movement dedicated to peaceful protest, Woza's 70,000 members are routinely arrested, beaten and intimidated.

As an outspoken critic of the current Zimbabwean regime, Williams is one of the most troublesome thorns in Mugabe's side. In a region where anti-government protesters have an uncomfortable habit of disappearing or turning up dead, her day-to-day existence is hazardous: although her main residence is in Bulawayo, south-west Zimbabwe, she moves in and out of safe houses and never stays more than six months in one place. She has been arrested 33 times.
Once she was abducted by police for 24 hours and driven 45km outside the city to an unknown destination. "They were telling me they were going to murder me and bury me and no one would ever know," says Williams. "Luckily for me, we ended up in a police station and some of the police officers were very sympathetic. There was no food there but one of those police officers came and whispered into the window of our cell: 'I'm bringing you food from your house. I know you are hungry.' So sometimes in life when you suspect the absolute worst thing, God sends you an angel."

She says, when I ask her if she ever loses hope in humanity, that this is her answer: finding goodness where you least expect it. Even at her lowest point in that prison yard, forced to sit for hours in the sunshine, her skin burning and her spirits shattered, something happened to salvage her hopes and keep her going. "My colleagues came and told me that Barack Obama had won and was going to be the next president of America and it was - " She breaks off, then emits a loud squeal of delight: "YES! And that made the pain not so bad."



A remarkable woman, a great organisation, and what a hellish country. Hard to imagine change, but I am assuming she does.

 

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